PipeChat Digest #5071 - Monday, January 10, 2005
 
Re: REPROACHES AND OTHER MUSIC FOR GOOD FRIDAY
  by <DERREINETOR@aol.com>
Hymn Introductions
  by "Emily Adams" <eadams@cinci.rr.com>
PipeChat IRC this evening,
  by "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca>
Hymn Introductions
  by "Daniel Hancock" <dhancock@brpae.com>
Hutchings organs
  by "Daniel Hancock" <dhancock@brpae.com>
Re: Hutchings out
  by "OUSCDB" <ouscdb@earthlink.net>
RE: Hymn introductions
  by "Dominic Scullion" <dominicscullion@email.com>
Johannus 8000 series Opus 20
  by <robian@esc.net.au>
Re: REPROACHES AND OTHER MUSIC FOR GOOD FRIDAY
  by "Noel Stoutenburg" <mjolnir@ticnet.com>
Re: Replacing Alleluias
  by "Alicia Zeilenga" <azeilenga@theatreorgans.com>
Felix Hell. Concert announcement
  by "Hell-Concerts@t-online.de" <Hell-Concerts@t-online.de>
Lord Organ Music in Cars
  by "Charlie Lester" <crl@137.com>
Re: Johannus 8000 series Opus 20
  by <Keys4bach@aol.com>
Re: Hymn Introductions
  by "Jan Nijhuis" <nijhuis@email.com>
Re: Hymn Introductions
  by "David Evangelides" <davide@theatreorgans.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: REPROACHES AND OTHER MUSIC FOR GOOD FRIDAY From: <DERREINETOR@aol.com> Date: Mon, 10 Jan 2005 06:44:31 EST   Scott,   There are settings of the Reproaches by (I'm almost positive) both = Palestrina and Vittoria. If you can't find them, we have them at St. John's, in = English. They are not difficult, and there is a lot of repetition. Quite beautiful, =   though. We have not used them in the past few years but will be using them = this year.   Traditionally, we have used plainchant or hymns that can be sung unaccompanied. We do not use the organ at all on Good Friday at St. = John's, though it could be used to support congregational singing, of course.   As for choir music:   During the Veneration of the Cross, we have been using the "Crux Fidelis" = of John IV of Portugal, which is not terribly difficult. Other motets which = fit this service well are the Palestrina "Adoramus te, Christe" (I believe = this is actually for the Feast of the Holy Cross) which is not difficult; also, Gibbons' "Drop, drop slow tears" as well which is in 5 parts (alto I and = II) and more difficult. Conveniently, these motets can be found in the Oxford New = Church Anthem Book and are easily had as separate octavos in a variety of = editions (esp. the John of Portugal--we use a manuscript edition edited by Sally = Slade Warner which I believe is unpublished).   So, some suggestions off the top of my head; though it will be = interesting to see what others on the list with "broader" music programs than ours = come up with.   Pax, Bill H. Boston        
(back) Subject: Hymn Introductions From: "Emily Adams" <eadams@cinci.rr.com> Date: Mon, 10 Jan 2005 08:48:04 -0500   Chuck asked: "So, how do you introduce hymns? Do you try to inspire? to set mood? or simply say "Here's the key we're in, now go, people". I guess I don't have a philosophy in place on this, which is why I'm asking. I tend to mix it up depending the day, on how inspiring I find the hymn, whether it's unfamiliar and needs a complete play-through, do I have a choir to lead? have I done too much today already?... that sort of thing."   I try to mix it up, too, in the interest of not adding yet more routine to =   the liturgical service. Everyone seems to agree our services are longer = than ideal, so I'm always mindful of saving time and have yet to play any four-line hymn all the way through. My standard intro is the last two = lines, or the entirety of a two-line hymn, or the refrain of hymns that have one. =   Once in a great while I'll do a first line and skip to the last line, but only if that's a smooth shift harmonically. I think it takes the congregation at least two lines to shift gears from whatever was happening =   before the hymn, to locate it in the hymnal, and to get to their feet. = Hymns are not verbally introduced by the pastor in our church.   I don't play varied intros on unfamiliar hymns but on familiar ones I try = to have at least one such intro per week. I usually cobble, customize or chop =   them out of a longer piece based on the tune. Repeating a previous recommendation, June Nixon's Organ Miniatures and Malcolm Archer's After = the Last Verse are fertile material. Congregants tell me they enjoy the = variety, which certainly makes it worth the effort.   I've heard organists play the beginnings of hymns as intros as Chuck reported. To my ear this just doesn't work.   Emily A.        
(back) Subject: PipeChat IRC this evening, From: "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca> Date: Mon, 10 Jan 2005 09:47:18 -0500   All members of PipeChat are invited to join us in the PipeChat IRC any Friday and Monday evening - beginning at 9.00 PM Eastern Time.   To find out more about the Chat room, or how to get into it, go to PipeChat-L web page at http://www.pipechat.org/   You will find out all you need to know to join us.   Tonight at 9.00 PM, - I hope that we will see you there.   Cheers,   Bob Conway     ****************************************************************** "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org>    
(back) Subject: Hymn Introductions From: "Daniel Hancock" <dhancock@brpae.com> Date: Mon, 10 Jan 2005 10:00:49 -0600     >So, how do you introduce hymns? Do you try to inspire? to set mood? or   >simply say "Here's the key we're in, now go, people". I guess I don't=20 >have a philosophy in place on this, which is why I'm asking. I tend=20 >to mix it up depending the day, on how inspiring I find the hymn,=20 >whether it's unfamiliar and needs a complete play-through, do I have a=20 >choir to lead? have I done too much today already?... that sort of=20 >thing.   >Chuck Peery >St. Louis   It depends on the hymn--if it's unfamiliar, I'll introduce the entire thing, sometimes with the melody line soloed out on the cornet, or trumpet.   If it's sure to be known, I'll introduce the opening and closing phrases, IF they can be successfully combined in succession.   For very familiar hymns on important occasions, I'll use one of a few favorite introductions from various publications. If you have time, there are a few nice ones in "The Parish Organist" and other similar sources. I've also been known to extract things from Partitas on hymn-tunes, or hymn arrangements, or arrange my own. But only if the congregation knows the hymn well.   Daniel Hancock Springfield, Missouri  
(back) Subject: Hutchings organs From: "Daniel Hancock" <dhancock@brpae.com> Date: Mon, 10 Jan 2005 10:12:30 -0600   > Does anyone know of any original tube-pneumatic or later Hutchings >organs >still in existence besides the one at my Church (Christ Church, Ansonia, >CT)? It seems that time has not been good to Hutchings organs, probably >because most builders were too chicken to deal with the side-valve chests, >and of course, the undeniable appetite of certain builders to nuke every >organ they come in contact with, not to even mention making so-called >"tonal >improvements".   > - Nathan   > Sound the memorial bell for the 1896 Hutchings at Christ Church, New >Haven, which should be in the beginnings of removal today.   A good, growing source for finding particular instruments is the International Organ Foundation (IOF), online at http://www.blackiris.com/organs/iof/.   Once there, you can select "Pipe organ and other Catalogues." In the "Pipe organs Catalogue," you can search for listed organs by period, maker, location, action type, or number of manuals.   A simple search for "Hutchings" turns up the following listings:   =20 USA, Maine, Brunswick First Parish Hutchings Plaisted 1883 2 P 23 =20 USA, Maine, Newcastle St Andrew's Hutchings 1888 2 P 15 =20 USA, Massachusetts, Boston Basilica of Our Lady Hutchings 1897 3 P 55 =20 USA, Massachusetts, Newburyport Immaculate Conception Hutchings Plaisted 1875 2 P 20 =20 USA, Massachusetts, South Hadley Mount Holyoke College: Chapel Hutchings 1898 4 P 64 =20 USA, Massachusetts, Worcester Pilgrim Hutchings 1889 3 P =20 USA, New York, Schenectady St John the Evangelist Hutchings-Votey 1904 3 P 51 =20 USA, Tennessee, Knoxville First Church Of Christ, Scientist Hutchings c1898 2 P 16 *=20 =20 =20 From here, you can select any of the entries to find information about the organs listed--most often a stoplist, history, sometimes information about mechanics and scaling, and occasionally a photo. =20   The goal of this foundation is to catalogue all pipe organs worldwide, so if you know of an organ that isn't listed, do take the time to contribute the information. =20   If you can, you should take care to document (and send to the catalogue!) what you can of the Hutchings organ you mentioned before it's completely gone. Such information can be invaluable to researchers, especially as more and more of these instruments disappear.   It may sound like I'm trying to "sell" the foundation, but I'm not affiliated with them in any way other than the fact that I'm completely fascinated with the catalogue, and wish to encourage both its use, and contributions to it.   Daniel Hancock, Springfield, Missouri  
(back) Subject: Re: Hutchings out From: "OUSCDB" <ouscdb@earthlink.net> Date: Mon, 10 Jan 2005 10:27:49 -0800   Nathan   Do you have more on the removal & replacement of HUtchings #486. While I believe it was electrified by Hall c1926, i believe it's original voicing was still intact. I know A Thompson-Allen did some repair work in the = early 1990s but funds did not exist for restoration.   I remember it sounded quite grand at OHS in 1994 (or was it 93). And the setting was delightfully Victorian Anglican   Is the parish still active & the Hutchings being replaced? (and of course with what?), or has the parish disbanded?   thanks for the info provided   George Nelson   < ouscdb@earthlink.net >   internet - <http://www.geocities.com/Vienna/Opera/2397/ouscdb.html>   ----- Original Message ----- From: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Monday, January 10, 2005 2:01 AM Subject: PipeChat Digest #5070 - 01/10/05     PipeChat Digest #5070 - Monday, January 10, 2005   Hutchings organs by "Nathan Smith" <erzahler@sbcglobal.net>    
(back) Subject: Hutchings organs From: "Nathan Smith" <erzahler@sbcglobal.net> Date: Mon, 10 Jan 2005 04:13:39 -0500 (Eastern Standard Time)   Hi List,   Does anyone know of any original tube-pneumatic or later Hutchings = organs still in existence besides the one at my Church (Christ Church, Ansonia, CT)? It seems that time has not been good to Hutchings organs, probably because most builders were too chicken to deal with the side-valve chests, and of course, the undeniable appetite of certain builders to nuke every organ they come in contact with, not to even mention making so-called = "tonal improvements".   - Nathan   Sound the memorial bell for the 1896 Hutchings at Christ Church, New Haven, which should be in the beginnings of removal today. ..