PipeChat Digest #5072 - Monday, January 10, 2005
 
Re: Lord Organ Music in Cars
  by <Gfc234@aol.com>
Hymn introductions
  by "Daniel Hancock" <dhancock@brpae.com>
Re: Lord Organ Music in Cars
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: PipeChat Digest #5071 - 01/10/05
  by "David Baker" <dgb137@mac.com>
Re: Johannus 8000 series Opus 20
  by "Jan Nijhuis" <nijhuis@email.com>
Baptism of our Lord -- Music
  by "Charlie Lester" <crl@137.com>
Re: Hymn introductions
  by <ProOrgo53@aol.com>
Re: Hutchings Organ in Knoxville
  by "Roy Kersey" <rkersey@tds.net>
Closing of St. Ann Armenian Cathedral in NYC
  by <OrganNYC@aol.com>
Email Contact for St. Ann Armenian Cathedral in NYC
  by <OrganNYC@aol.com>
Re: Baptism of our Lord -- Music
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: Hutchings organs
  by <DERREINETOR@aol.com>
Hymn Intros
  by <RVScara@aol.com>
Re: Hymn Introductions
  by <Tspiggle@aol.com>
Re: Hymn Introductions
  by "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
Re: Hymn Introductions
  by <Tspiggle@aol.com>
Hutchings Organs
  by "Nathan Smith" <erzahler@sbcglobal.net>
Re: Johannus 8000 series Opus 20
  by "F. Richard Burt" <effarbee@verizon.net>
Re: Lord Organ Music in Cars
  by "Karl Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Lord Organ Music in Cars From: <Gfc234@aol.com> Date: Mon, 10 Jan 2005 16:08:11 EST     In a message dated 1/10/05 2:21:31 PM, crl@137.com writes:     > awking from fellow motorists! I guess I was the original > "Boom-Car" owner in Annapolis but rather than playing disco > or rock music, I was playing Bach, Widor, Vierne...!! > > [I did at the time also like disco for dancing, and also > very much liked the so-called "symphonic" rock - Ric >   great story-speaking of disco and bach-i think that the a minor (great) prelude has a few disco sections-where the pedal is playing the 8ths. = haha-yes. im nuts. cheers gfc     Gregory Ceurvorst 1921 Sherman Ave. #GS Evanston, IL 60201 847.332.2788 home/fax 708.243.2549 mobile gfc234@aol.com gfc234@nextel.blackberry.net  
(back) Subject: Hymn introductions From: "Daniel Hancock" <dhancock@brpae.com> Date: Mon, 10 Jan 2005 15:14:29 -0600   I've heard organists play the beginnings of hymns as intros as Chuck=20 reported. To my ear this just doesn't work.   Emily A.   To hear this work successfully (and I think it takes a trained choir and a congregation used to it) listen to hymn introductions on the BBC online broadcast of "Choral Evensong: Every week since 1926." I wouldn't have thought it worked so well, but it usually does here beautifully--especially when the last chord of the first line ends on the dominant, third inversion.   Daniel Hancock Springfield, Missouri  
(back) Subject: Re: Lord Organ Music in Cars From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Mon, 10 Jan 2005 16:16:15 +0000   On 1/10/05 8:20 PM, "Charlie Lester" <crl@137.com> wrote:   > Ah, this "takes me back" as well. In 1975, a year out of high school, I = bought > my first car -- a "new to me" beautiful, dark green 1972 Mercury Cougar = XR7 > with more chrome on the front of it than you could shake a stick at!   Ah, wealth! I got my first one just after high school graduation too. I was 17, and the car was 14. Cost me $50 cash, and my dad wouldn't let me drive it until I spend another $100 or so on mechanical improvements for greater safety.   Radio? No money left for that. Tape decks not invented yet.   Oh, it was a "cloth-top," all right. But that doesn't mean "convertible"; it means only that the center part of the roof was made of some sort of fabric.   Alan Freed, in his 1936 Plymouth two-door sedan      
(back) Subject: Re: PipeChat Digest #5071 - 01/10/05 From: "David Baker" <dgb137@mac.com> Date: Mon, 10 Jan 2005 16:28:01 -0500   I agree that the King John "Crux Fidelis" is beautiful, but every choir I've given it to has had trouble with the way the voice parts cross, especially the women. The harmonic progression is unusual for the time period, IMHO, so I would not call it easy by any means. David Baker   On Jan 10, 2005, at 4:08 PM, PipeChat wrote:   > During the Veneration of the Cross, we have been using the "Crux > Fidelis" of > John IV of Portugal, which is not terribly difficult.
(back) Subject: Re: Johannus 8000 series Opus 20 From: "Jan Nijhuis" <nijhuis@email.com> Date: Tue, 11 Jan 2005 05:34:17 +0800   Not to get on anyone's bad side, but ...   A U.S. parts distributor isn't going to help much in Australia ... I think = FedEx or an other courier can get parts from Ede, Holland to just about any= where globally in short order.   I'm pretty sure that "If your local dealer leaves ... " holds for any brand= .. (We'd all be in real trouble if Lowery would just disappear.)   The quality in casework, components, and sound are there. Go for the organ = sound that works best for your situation.     ----- Original Message ----- From: Keys4bach@aol.com To: pipechat@pipechat.org Subject: Re: Johannus 8000 series Opus 20 Date: Mon, 10 Jan 2005 15:20:50 EST   >=20 >=20 > In a message dated 1/10/2005 1:54:29 P.M. Eastern Standard Time, > robian@esc.net.au writes: >=20 > Anyone know what the samples sound like? >=20 > Quality of console construction? >=20 > Comments in general?   Dale Said...   > samples are pretty darn good more american than ever. > construction is not so pretty good but getting better > no warehouse of parts in US---if your local dealer leaves...............= ... > avoid is my recommendation....yes, the same advice i gave my parents chu= rch. > dale in florida       -- Jan Nijhuis nijhuis@email.com   --=20 ___________________________________________________________ Sign-up for Ads Free at Mail.com http://promo.mail.com/adsfreejump.htm    
(back) Subject: Baptism of our Lord -- Music From: "Charlie Lester" <crl@137.com> Date: Mon, 10 Jan 2005 14:27:10 -0800   Alan Freed wrote, in pertinent part,   =3D->I think I've told you before how Cantor Pedro d'Aquino "paints" a picture of the text at the keyboards.... "The voice of the Lord is upon the waters.... The God of glory thunders; the Lord is upon the mighty waters.... The Lord sits enthroned above the flood...." So Pedro's registrations and harmonizations were DARK, DENSE, THICK, threateningly complex. Almost spooky. Until the line, In the temple of the Lord all are crying "Glory!" On JUST the two quick-short syllables of "Glory," his registration and harmonization changed shockingly into a splendid splash of joy! Just awesome! <-=3D     When appropriate, I too do "planned-improvised scene paintings" at the organ with scriptures. And I did with the psalm yesterday very much as Cantor d'Aquino did. I wove the melodies of three "Christ's Baptism" hymns into the following thematic elements:     -- PSALM 29 --   -- 1 -- A Psalm of David. Ascribe unto the Lord, O ye sons of might, ascribe unto the Lord glory and strength.   ORGAN: The melody line of "Lord, When You Came to Jordan" on Swell Oboe, played jubilantly and in melodic minor ...     -- 2 -- Ascribe unto the Lord the glory due unto His name; worship the Lord in the beauty of holiness.   ... Detached, fanfare-like melodic minor chords still based on "Lord, When You Came to Jordan" ...     -- 3 -- The voice of the Lord is upon the waters; the God of glory thundereth, even the Lord upon many waters.   ... I started out very softly on the swell strings, playing low thick cords based on "When Jesus Came to Jordan" that undulated up and down to suggest the sound of the waters, that motif building in color, volume and intensity from the word "thundereth" ...     -- 4 -- The voice of the Lord is powerful; the voice of the Lord is full of majesty.   ... Full Swell and Pedal - low, thick, minor chords ...     -- 5 -- The voice of the Lord breaketh the cedars; yea, the Lord breaketh in pieces the cedars of Lebanon.   ... Quick chromatic run down the Swell manual as I opened the box ...     -- 6 -- He maketh them also to skip like a calf; Lebanon and Sirion like a young wild-ox.   ... Short, abrupt big chords (still based on "When Jesus Came to Jordan") on Swell ...     -- 7 -- The voice of the Lord heweth out flames of fire.   ... Coupled Swell to Great 16,8,4, drawing Great foundations - same chordal motif as before except played higher on the manuals ...     -- 8 -- The voice of the Lord shaketh the wilderness; the Lord shaketh the wilderness of Kadesh.   ... Of course ... undulating Full-Pedal clusters, then flourishes on the manual on "When Jesus Came to Jordan" ...     -- 9 -- The voice of the Lord maketh the hinds to calve, and strippeth the forests bare; and in His temple all say: 'Glory.'   ... As d'Aquino, on the two syllables of GLORY, I mashed the SFZ and then the organ pealed forth...     -- 10 - the Lord sat enthroned at the flood; yea, the Lord sitteth as King for ever.   ... Modulated to major key -- triumphant, majestic chords on Full Organ, on the hymn "Christ, When for Us You Were Baptised" - yes, the liturgist sailed right along with me, reading magnificently!...     -- 11 - the Lord will give strength unto His people; the Lord will bless his people with peace.   ... Quick decrescendo - retired SFZ, withdrew crescendo pedal, moved back to Swell, ended on the same String registration I started with except now in the major key and melody of "Christ, When for Us You Were Baptised."     =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D     "Lord, When You Came to Jordan" tune: "Genevan"   "When Jesus Came to Jordan" tune: "De Eersten zin de Laatsten"   "Christ, When for Us You Were Baptised" tune: "Caithness"      
(back) Subject: Re: Hymn introductions From: <ProOrgo53@aol.com> Date: Mon, 10 Jan 2005 18:17:28 EST   Greetings hymnists and organists alike - I'm not "sporting" one particular method of hymn introductions, just reporting what I've experienced (in the UK while attending the Southern = Cathedrals Festival '99 and mass at St. Paul's/London, same summer) - as well as a host of CD recordings of hymns (I'm a Life Member of The Hymn Society and aim to collect, listen to = and study every LP/CD I can manage to obtain (while life shall last . . .). The trend at all the above-named venues is - organist plays the first phrase, pauses, begins the hymn in the same tempo and mood of the = introduction. One aside/disclaimer (perhaps): all were semi or professional choirs. = Perhaps that makes some difference; non-the-less, it was the practice that I witnessed, with large, well-attended services and concerts in which the audience/congregation participated in singing with the choir(s). I did not, ever, hear a single instance of the old, long-standing "tradition" of the organist playing a "gathering/waiting" (first) chord of = the hymn (presumably to give everyone a chance to begin singing (again) each new = stanza, including the first stanza. Rumor has it that the Brits heard that such a =   routine is not practiced in the US and decided to make a change. (?) Dale G. Rider Independence, MO  
(back) Subject: Re: Hutchings Organ in Knoxville From: "Roy Kersey" <rkersey@tds.net> Date: Mon, 10 Jan 2005 18:46:15 -0500   Hello Nathan and Musical Friends, The Hutchings at the Knoxville, Tennessee First Church of Christ, = Scientist is profiled at organbuilder Bradley Rule's website:   http://www.esper.com/organbuilder/   The organ, according to the website, was originally elsewhere, in = Dorchester Lower Mills, MA and was acquired by the Knoxville church = through the OCH. It was originally a tracker that had been electrified in = its former location. Mr. Rule worked his usual magic by way of combining = pipes from the church's old organ, a Pilcher, with the Hutchings to = produce a 19th Century inspired rebuild. Other old pipe ranks and some = newly made by Paul Byron of Maine, who I believe is an Andover alumnus (as = is Mr. Rule), were also used. Nathan, perhaps Mr. Rule could tell you = more about Hutchings organs if you emailed him, he is very knowledgeable = on organs of this period. One hears so much about historically correct restoration and about = rebuilds that distort and destroy, but little about historically informed = and sensitive rebuilding and replicating such as Brad Rule does so = superbly. I've often heard him call them American Romantic (romantically = voiced)Trackers. As some have mentioned here lately, organs ideally = suited to the church traditions and acoustic environments in whcih they = were found. Best Wishes, Roy Kersey Organ Enthusaist and Amateur Trumpeter      
(back) Subject: Closing of St. Ann Armenian Cathedral in NYC From: <OrganNYC@aol.com> Date: Mon, 10 Jan 2005 18:57:17 EST   Dear List Members, My first attempt to post this was rejected due to the forwarded = attachment, so I'll try again. I am passing along the following email regarding the closing of St. Ann Armenian Catholic Cathedral in NYC. Perhaps someone would be interested in = salvaging the organ. Photos and spec can be seen on the NYC AGO website = at http://nycago.org/Organs/html/StAnnArmenianRiteCathedral.html Steve Lawson Webmaster - NYC AGO _www.nycago.org_ (http://www.nycago.org) =3D=3D=3D=3D Sorrowfully, I advise you that the Cathedral of St. Ann, located at 110 = East 12th St., New York City will be closed following the last mass on Sunday, =   January 16. The Cathedral and its adjacent property has been sold to developers by the Archdiocese of New York (Cardinal Egan), and will be = demolished in the spring, if not before.   I call this to your attention in the hopes that your organization, or another, may be able to salvage the organ in her midst. Please contact = me for further information.   Respectfully, Nancy Cosie    
(back) Subject: Email Contact for St. Ann Armenian Cathedral in NYC From: <OrganNYC@aol.com> Date: Mon, 10 Jan 2005 19:01:29 EST   Sorry -- I forgot to include the email address for Nancy Cosie. It is _NFC613@aol.com_ (mailto:NFC613@aol.com) . Steve Lawson - NYC =3D=3D=3D=3D Sorrowfully, I advise you that the Cathedral of St. Ann, located at 110 = East 12th St., New York City will be closed following the last mass on Sunday, =   January 16. The Cathedral and its adjacent property has been sold to developers by the Archdiocese of New York (Cardinal Egan), and will be = demolished in the spring, if not before.   I call this to your attention in the hopes that your organization, or another, may be able to salvage the organ in her midst. Please contact = me for further information.   Respectfully, Nancy Cosie    
(back) Subject: Re: Baptism of our Lord -- Music From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Mon, 10 Jan 2005 19:20:23 +0000   Charlie: I am gaspingly out of BREATH! I LOVE it! I think few congregations are so fortunate as yours and mine. (I'm forwarding this whole thing to Cantor Pedro, and to our pastor, as you can well imagine.) Thanks for a MOST inspiring account!   Alan   On 1/10/05 10:27 PM, "Charlie Lester" <crl@137.com> wrote:   > Alan Freed wrote, in pertinent part, > > =3D->I think I've told you before how Cantor Pedro d'Aquino "paints" a = picture > of the text at the keyboards.... "The voice of the Lord is upon the = waters.... > The God of glory thunders; the Lord is upon the mighty waters.... The = Lord > sits enthroned above the flood...." So Pedro's registrations and > harmonizations were DARK, DENSE, THICK, threateningly complex. Almost = spooky. > Until the line, In the temple of the Lord all are crying "Glory!" On = JUST the > two quick-short syllables of "Glory," his registration and harmonization > changed shockingly into a splendid splash of joy! Just awesome! <-=3D > > When appropriate, I too do "planned-improvised scene paintings" at the = organ > with scriptures. And I did with the psalm yesterday very much as Cantor > d'Aquino did. I wove the melodies of three "Christ's Baptism" hymns into = the > following thematic elements: > > > -- PSALM 29 -- > > -- 1 -- A Psalm of David. Ascribe unto the Lord, O ye sons of might, = ascribe > unto the Lord glory and strength. > > ORGAN: The melody line of "Lord, When You Came to Jordan" on Swell Oboe, > played jubilantly and in melodic minor ... > > > -- 2 -- Ascribe unto the Lord the glory due unto His name; worship the = Lord in > the beauty of holiness. > > ... Detached, fanfare-like melodic minor chords still based on "Lord, = When You > Came to Jordan" ... > > > -- 3 -- The voice of the Lord is upon the waters; the God of glory = thundereth, > even the Lord upon many waters. > > ... I started out very softly on the swell strings, playing low thick = cords > based on "When Jesus Came to Jordan" that undulated up and down to = suggest the > sound of the waters, that motif building in color, volume and intensity = from > the word "thundereth" ... > > > -- 4 -- The voice of the Lord is powerful; the voice of the Lord is full = of > majesty. > > ... Full Swell and Pedal - low, thick, minor chords ... > > > -- 5 -- The voice of the Lord breaketh the cedars; yea, the Lord = breaketh in > pieces the cedars of Lebanon. > > ... Quick chromatic run down the Swell manual as I opened the box ... > > > -- 6 -- He maketh them also to skip like a calf; Lebanon and Sirion like = a > young wild-ox. > > ... Short, abrupt big chords (still based on "When Jesus Came to = Jordan") on > Swell ... > > > -- 7 -- The voice of the Lord heweth out flames of fire. > > ... Coupled Swell to Great 16,8,4, drawing Great foundations - same = chordal > motif as before except played higher on the manuals ... > > > -- 8 -- The voice of the Lord shaketh the wilderness; the Lord shaketh = the > wilderness of Kadesh. > > ... Of course ... undulating Full-Pedal clusters, then flourishes on the > manual on "When Jesus Came to Jordan" ... > > > -- 9 -- The voice of the Lord maketh the hinds to calve, and strippeth = the > forests bare; and in His temple all say: 'Glory.' > > ... As d'Aquino, on the two syllables of GLORY, I mashed the SFZ and = then the > organ pealed forth... > > > -- 10 - the Lord sat enthroned at the flood; yea, the Lord sitteth as = King for > ever. > > ... Modulated to major key -- triumphant, majestic chords on Full Organ, = on > the hymn "Christ, When for Us You Were Baptised" - yes, the liturgist = sailed > right along with me, reading magnificently!... > > > -- 11 - the Lord will give strength unto His people; the Lord will bless = his > people with peace. > > ... Quick decrescendo - retired SFZ, withdrew crescendo pedal, moved = back to > Swell, ended on the same String registration I started with except now = in the > major key and melody of "Christ, When for Us You Were Baptised." > > > =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D > > > "Lord, When You Came to Jordan" tune: "Genevan" > > "When Jesus Came to Jordan" tune: "De Eersten zin de Laatsten" > > "Christ, When for Us You Were Baptised" tune: "Caithness" >    
(back) Subject: Re: Hutchings organs From: <DERREINETOR@aol.com> Date: Mon, 10 Jan 2005 19:35:26 EST     > Sound the memorial bell for the 1896 Hutchings at Christ Church, New >Haven, which should be in the beginnings of removal today.   What a shame. Where's it going?   )? It seems that time has not been good to Hutchings organs, probably >because most builders were too chicken to deal with the side-valve chests, >and of course, the undeniable appetite of certain builders to nuke every >organ they come in contact with, not to even mention making so-called >"tonal >improvements".   Indeed.   Bill H. Boston Hutchings, op. 210 (Tracker, 1889/90; moved from chancel to gallery and electrified by Hook & =   Hastings, 1930; retrackerized and tonal modifications, Beaudry, = 1967-1972.)  
(back) Subject: Hymn Intros From: <RVScara@aol.com> Date: Mon, 10 Jan 2005 20:40:29 EST   Time is the element (for me) in deciding how much, or little, a hymn = Intro to play. ( Years ago, I played for several clergy who told me how much of = an Intro to play.) Now, I usually use the first and last few measures. If = I can't "blend those in" it's time for me to quit. I time the music to end when the Celebrant (RC Masses) is ready to = begin the next part of the service. Not nice for a Celebrant to be kept waiting = to continue as we just started another long hymn verse. So, no long Intros = and we may get to sing another verse of the hymn. Intros for the Service Responses are a different story. For the Acclamations, Holy/Holy, etc, I play the printed Intro (if any) or just = the first measure and then the congregation starts right in. I give them those first notes since we use 6 different settings and I change them weekly. Music is, IMHO, a more significant part of the Services of other denominations. It is given more emphasis and quality time. A decent Intro = will "set up" the congregation for proper singing of the hymn. Bob Scara St Paul RC Burlington, NJ  
(back) Subject: Re: Hymn Introductions From: <Tspiggle@aol.com> Date: Mon, 10 Jan 2005 20:41:02 EST   Emily, you say your standard intro is the last two lines. I was trained = that you never use the last of a song as the introduction. Instead, you should always start at the first of the hymn as the intro so the people will know = how to start. The congregation needs to know how the song begins, not how it = ends. If you get them started, they'll make it to the end. Of course, if it's a = very familiar hymn, the people will know how to start, but if it's not too = familiar, they won't. Because of the way I was trained, I always start my intros at = the first about 95% of the time.   Tom  
(back) Subject: Re: Hymn Introductions From: "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> Date: Mon, 10 Jan 2005 20:50:16 -0500   I hadn't thought of this before--probably because I never had much of a=20=   formal musical education. But I'm very glad to learn it. I'll try it=20=   out next Sunday. I, too, had been using the last line or two as the=20 introduction, all these years.   By the way, though, your last line is unintentionally pretty funny: =20 "always... about 95% of the time." Sounds a bit like something Yoga=20 Berra or Samuel Goldwin would say. ; - )   Randy R.     On Jan 10, 2005, at 8:41 PM, Tspiggle@aol.com wrote:   > Emily, you say your standard intro is the last two lines. I was=20 > trained that you=A0never use the last of a song as the introduction.=20=   > Instead, you should always start at the first of the hymn as the intro=20=   > so the people will know how to start. The congregation needs to know=20=   > how the song begins, not how it ends. If you get them started, they'll=20=   > make it to the end. Of course, if it's a very familiar hymn, the=20 > people will know how to start, but if it's not too familiar, they=20 > won't. Because of the way I was trained, I always start my intros at=20=   > the first about 95% of the time. > =A0 > Tom=A0=A0=A0=A0  
(back) Subject: Re: Hymn Introductions From: <Tspiggle@aol.com> Date: Mon, 10 Jan 2005 21:08:10 EST   Good point, Randy. I started typing the sentence saying I "always" used = the first of the song as intro, and then changed my mind half way through. I = forgot to take out the "always". Anyway, the 5% of the time I don't is for = something very familiar, like maybe the Doxology.   Tom  
(back) Subject: Hutchings Organs From: "Nathan Smith" <erzahler@sbcglobal.net> Date: Mon, 10 Jan 2005 21:35:17 -0500 (Eastern Standard Time)   Hello list,=0D =0D Thank you for the replies to my inquiry - I will have to check the database!=0D =0D The Hutchings at my Church (Christ Church, Ansonia) is alive and well, and not a single original pipe is missing from it. The only two modifications being the removal of one of the sets of Swell shades, and o= f course, the electrification. The electrification was very minimal, with magnets being installed where the tubes would be, and a new console - the chest actions have not been changed at all, and the Great has never been re-leathered (scary!) The Choir was re-leathered a long time ago, probab= ly by the Goecklers, and the Swell, some regulators, facade chest, and a tremolo or two were re-leathered by ATA. The organ still gets it done, although the leather is pretty tired, but as always, money is a factor.=0D =0D The Hutchings that is being removed is Opus 384 from Christ Church, Ne= w Haven. It has a console and tonal re-do from Aeolian Skinner, 1006A is t= he opus I believe, but the beautiful Hutchings chassis didn't change much. = The organ is on slider chests, the Swell chest being one of the largest slide= r chests I've seen, they are mounted on massive clear wood building frames.= =0D =0D The new organ will be a Lively-Fulcher, which I look forward to meetin= g soon, but I will miss the old Hutchings very much, I've grown quite fond = of it. One of my favorite things to do was to watch the massive stop action machines as all of the stops were canceled at once - the machines were so powerful that the side of the machine (solid wood) would literally suck i= n under the force!=0D =0D They don't make them like that anymore! (C:=0D =0D Best,=0D =0D - Nathan=0D =20
(back) Subject: Re: Johannus 8000 series Opus 20 From: "F. Richard Burt" <effarbee@verizon.net> Date: Mon, 10 Jan 2005 21:29:50 -0600   Hello, Robian: Subject: Johannus 8000 series Opus 20     > Anyone know what the samples sound like? Yes. These are the more advanced samples, with quite decent imitation of the wind blown pipes. > Quality of console construction? Slab-sided, modern type sans molded ends pieces. Sturdy and functional. > Comments in general? I have mostly installed the three-manual Opus 30, but would regard the Opus 20 and being better sounding because there are fewer voices to spread across the four active audio channels of the sound system. I have an older (9500 technologies) customized Opus 20, and it can be nicely voiced, but the samples are older and will match up with the higher quality samples in the 8000 technologies. Even so, I often rent it out to churches looking for replacement digital organs while they work on their pipe organs. F. Richard Burt Dorian Organs ..    
(back) Subject: Re: Lord Organ Music in Cars From: "Karl Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu> Date: Mon, 10 Jan 2005 22:35:02 -0500   Reminds of a pastor who liked Christmas carols and played them LOUD all year long, windows open and all. He once tried to describe the looks he'd get while driving through town.   Karl E. Moyer Lancaster PA