PipeChat Digest #5074 - Tuesday, January 11, 2005
 
Re: Skinner/Aeolian-Skinner at St. John the Divine
  by "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com>
Christ Church New Haven Hutchings
  by "Nathan Smith" <erzahler@sbcglobal.net>
Re: Oceans of Strings
  by "Margo Dillard" <dillardm@airmail.net>
Re: Oceans of Strings
  by "Bob Elms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au>
RE: Oceans of Strings
  by "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
Re: Hutchings organs
  by "mack02445" <mack02445@comcast.net>
Oceans of Strings
  by "F. Richard Burt" <effarbee@verizon.net>
RE: Oceans of Strings
  by "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
16' open wood available
  by "John Vanderlee" <jovanderlee@vassar.edu>
Oceans of Strings
  by "F. Richard Burt" <effarbee@verizon.net>
Re: Oceans of Strings
  by "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
St John the Divine Skinner/A-S
  by "Ned Benson" <nbenson@stjohnschurch.org>
Re: Hymn Introductions
  by "littlebayus@yahoo.com" <littlebayus@yahoo.com>
Hymn playing, particularly registration
  by "Russ Parker" <rparker@heightscpc.org>
Re: Hymn playing, particularly registration
  by "Charles Peery" <cepeery@earthlink.net>
Re: Hymn playing, particularly registration
  by "Jan Nijhuis" <nijhuis@email.com>
RE: Hymn playing, particularly registration
  by "Dominic Scullion" <dominicscullion@email.com>
RE: Hymn playing, particularly registration
  by "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
"pristine"
  by "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
Scudamore organs and others
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Skinner/Aeolian-Skinner at St. John the Divine From: "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com> Date: Tue, 11 Jan 2005 06:14:19 -0600   >In a message dated 1/10/05 11:22:42 PM Central Standard Time, >nbenson@stjohnschurch.org writes: > >>Michael Quimby's crew is removing the Skinner/Aeolian-Skinner instrument >>from St. John the Divine this month for shipment to Missouri for >>cleaning and fixup. >> > > >Are we talking the grand organ from the Cathedral of St. John the >Divine in New York City??? That's excellent news! But when did >that happen? I have heard nothing of it...   If you check the Quimby "Works In Progress" web page there is a little info about it http://www.quimbypipeorgans.com/wkprog.htm   David  
(back) Subject: Christ Church New Haven Hutchings From: "Nathan Smith" <erzahler@sbcglobal.net> Date: Tue, 11 Jan 2005 07:49:55 -0500 (Eastern Standard Time)   Dear List,=0D =0D I suppose I see organs from the chest up, rather than the pipes down.=20 (C: Those old slider chests are top-of-the-line, and would make a fine chassis for a Church. 108 years isn't too bad, eh?=0D =0D I often wonder if the builders like Mr. Hutchings contemplated the distant future of their organs, going past one hundred years. They were certainly built to last. Wouldn't it be funny to talk to Mr. Hutchings o= nly to hear him say: "What? I would have switched to those direct-electric valves a long time ago".=0D =0D - Nathan
(back) Subject: Re: Oceans of Strings From: "Margo Dillard" <dillardm@airmail.net> Date: Tue, 11 Jan 2005 07:07:45 -0600   You know - from what all the Anglicans say, I thought Methodists invented it. And from what all the Methodists say, I thought Baptists invented it. I guess the only people we can't blame are the Church of Christ...   Margo   F. Richard Burt wrote: > Hello, PipeChatters: > > Ross wrote: > > Yes, yes, yes, I do, ad infinitum, ad nauseam. Anglicans did not > invent this > slush, I'm certain of that.         -- Dr. Margo Dillard Organist, FUMC, Lewisville, TX Musical Feast Choral Society Dillard Piano & Organ Studio    
(back) Subject: Re: Oceans of Strings From: "Bob Elms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au> Date: Tue, 11 Jan 2005 21:42:23 +0800   Hey! Go easy on the Methodists (well we are called Uniting Church here in OZ). Our hymns for Sunday: Praise my soul, the King of Heaven (Praise, my soul) Praise to the Holiest in the Height (Gerontius). Praise the Lord ye heaven adore Him (Austria) Oh praise ye the Lord, praise him in the height. (Laudate Dominum) Glkory be to God the Father (Regent Square) No slush there and free harmony for the last verse where appropriate. Bob Elms.   ----- Original Message ----- From: "Margo Dillard" <dillardm@airmail.net> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Tuesday, January 11, 2005 9:07 PM Subject: Re: Oceans of Strings     > You know - from what all the Anglicans say, I thought Methodists = invented > it. And from what all the Methodists say, I thought Baptists invented = it. > I guess the only people we can't blame are the Church of Christ... > > Margo         -- No virus found in this outgoing message. Checked by AVG Anti-Virus. Version: 7.0.300 / Virus Database: 265.6.10 - Release Date: 10/01/2005    
(back) Subject: RE: Oceans of Strings From: "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Wed, 12 Jan 2005 02:52:20 +1300   >Praise my soul, the King of Heaven (Praise, my soul) >Praise to the Holiest in the Height (Gerontius). >Praise the Lord ye heaven adore Him (Austria) >Oh praise ye the Lord, praise him in the height. (Laudate Dominum) >Glory be to God the Father (Regent Square)   All noble old hymns, Bob, very singable, bass parts for deep voices like mine, these all need to be kept in the congregation's repertoire.   Ross    
(back) Subject: Re: Hutchings organs From: "mack02445" <mack02445@comcast.net> Date: Tue, 11 Jan 2005 09:11:20 -0500   Bill,   Its going to Reno(?) Nevada to another church not Anglican ;-) .   Mack     DERREINETOR@aol.com wrote:   > > > Sound the memorial bell for the 1896 Hutchings at Christ Church, New > >Haven, which should be in the beginnings of removal today. > > *What a shame. Where's it going?* > >  
(back) Subject: Oceans of Strings From: "F. Richard Burt" <effarbee@verizon.net> Date: Tue, 11 Jan 2005 08:31:02 -0600   Good Morning, Margo:   > You know - from what all the Anglicans say, I thought Methodists > invented it. And from what all the Methodists say, I thought Baptists > invented it. I guess the only people we can't blame are the Church of > Christ...   .. . . and there is something "pristine" about the collective sound of th congregation singing "a capella."   Dick Burt     ..      
(back) Subject: RE: Oceans of Strings From: "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Wed, 12 Jan 2005 03:42:17 +1300       >. . . and there is something "pristine" about the collective sound of th congregation singing "a capella."   What is the American meaning of "pristine"??? According to the OED and = UK/NZ useage, "pristine" merely means "former". So, for example, an organ being restored to pristine condition means it is restored to how it was originally.   Ross    
(back) Subject: 16' open wood available From: "John Vanderlee" <jovanderlee@vassar.edu> Date: Tue, 11 Jan 2005 09:35:05 -0800   I have just been informed that some one in northern NJ is trying to unload a 45? note (classical) set of 16' open pipes. I should have more details on Thursday nite. It supposedly includes the chest as well. This will be a "no reasonable offer refused " deal, that is if you come and get it.   Let me know if you have an interest, by private email.   John V  
(back) Subject: Oceans of Strings From: "F. Richard Burt" <effarbee@verizon.net> Date: Tue, 11 Jan 2005 09:08:14 -0600   Good Morning, Ross:   I wrote:   > >. . . and there is something "pristine" about the collective sound > of th congregation singing "a capella."   You inquired:   > What is the American meaning of "pristine"??? According to the OED and UK/NZ > useage, "pristine" merely means "former". So, for example, an organ being > restored to pristine condition means it is restored to how it was > originally.   How about "pure?"   In the traditions established here in the colonies, the congregations of Christians, known locally as "The Church of Christ," the music is all sung without accompaniment of musical instruments. It is all sung "a capella." Among evangelicals in the southwest, these people build worship spaces that favor the music, and it usually decently reverberant. These are not the reverberant spaces of European traditions, with stone walls, floors, etc., but usually good for the sustained sounds of the human voice in praise.   The Church of Christ is close kin with The Christian Church, Disciples of Christ, who accepted the organ as a viable worship instrument. BUT, among the individual congregations, there is strong sentiment that the style (accompanied/unaccompanied) be kept where it belongs. <grins>   I became a Christian at the age of 12, and was properly baptised by emersion in the First Christian Church, North Little Rock, Arkansas. At age 14, I became a Baptist. My larger family were mostly Methodist, Church of Christ, Christian (Disciples of Christ), and Baptist. We make an interesting collection when we visit together. <grins>   So, my definition of the singing in the Church of Christ as being "pure," is based on how I view the sound of the music they express it. Perhaps being "pure" is a proper definition of the "former" beauty of the way the congregations praised collectively, . . . before organs were allowed in the church building at all.   .. . . which was a long, long time ago for most of us.   F. Richard Burt     ..      
(back) Subject: Re: Oceans of Strings From: "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> Date: Tue, 11 Jan 2005 10:10:20 -0500   Hi, Ross. You are quite right. The OED only gives the pristine meaning, = as it=20 were, of "pristine." However, American usage does indeed differ=20 apparently, though I would like to know what definition a 20th- or=20 21st-century British dictionary would give.   According to the Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary,   Etymology: L pristinus; akin to Latin prior 1 : belonging to the earliest period or state : ORIGINAL <the=20 hypothetical pristine lunar atmosphere> 2 a : not spoiled, corrupted, or polluted (as by civilization) : PURE=20 <a pristine forest> b : fresh and clean as or as if new <pristine=20 hard-backs in uniform editions to fill our built-in bookcases --=20 Michiko Kakutani>   According to the American Heritage Dictionary:   =A0 1a. Remaining in a pure state; uncorrupted by civilization. b.=20 Remaining free from dirt or decay; clean: pristine mountain snow. 2.=20 Of, relating to, or typical of the earliest time or condition;=20 primitive or original.   It's interesting that the American Heritage actually gives preference=20 to the newer meaning by giving it first.     Randy Runyon     On Jan 11, 2005, at 9:42 AM, TheShieling wrote:   > > >> . . . and there is something "pristine" about the collective sound > of th congregation singing "a capella." > > What is the American meaning of "pristine"??? According to the OED and=20=   > UK/NZ > useage, "pristine" merely means "former". So, for example, an organ=20 > being > restored to pristine condition means it is restored to how it was > originally. > > Ross > > > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> >  
(back) Subject: St John the Divine Skinner/A-S From: "Ned Benson" <nbenson@stjohnschurch.org> Date: Tue, 11 Jan 2005 07:28:08 -0800   Yes, the big Kahuna. It's listed on Quimby's website now: http://www.quimbypipeorgans.com/wkprog.htm   Michael put on a suit and tie last summer to meet with the Curator; then again in the fall. The Curator is doing the State Trumpt - Quimby's doing all the rest. The deal was done sometime in Oct or Nov.It was hush-hush, I think, until it was a done deal. He listed the job on the website in Dec.   Had I not been working with Michael on our own job, I'd not have know. He doesn't seem to be one for tooting his own trumpet. He's also going to be doing the Skinner and A-S at the Cathedral of St. Paul in St. Paul, Minn, but that's not posted on his website yet so the contract is probably not yet signed. The same for our job.   Nice to have a little work in the pipeline.   =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D >Michael Quimby's crew is removing the Skinner/Aeolian-Skinner instrument >> from St. John the Divine this month for shipment to Missouri for cleaning >> and fixup.   Are we talking the grand organ from the Cathedral of St. John the Divine = in New York City??? That's excellent news! But when did that happen? I have heard nothing of it...   -- Dr. Ned H. Benson St. John's Presbyterian Church 1070 West Plumb Lane Reno, Nevada 89509 http://www.stjohnschurch.org    
(back) Subject: Re: Hymn Introductions From: "littlebayus@yahoo.com" <littlebayus@yahoo.com> Date: Tue, 11 Jan 2005 07:35:05 -0800 (PST)     --- David Evangelides <davide@theatreorgans.com> wrote:   > I agree with Dominic, Jan, Daniel and others. Also, > if the hymn is a > majestic opening anthem such as Crown Him With Many > Crowns, take the time > to play through the entire verse. First line play > single-note solo > melody with reed or trumpet; second line, remove > the reed + add alto > notes; third line add left hand; fourth line add > base pedals. >   [snip]   Can you hear my applause in the background? I'm so glad to learn that *I* am not the only one who, as one of my hymn-introducing techniques, uses this method....   For *very* familiar hymns (in the old days when we sang it, for Onward Christian Soldiers) I often just play the first and last lines...   Best wishes to all...     Morton Belcher fellow list member...         __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Mail - 250MB free storage. Do more. Manage less. http://info.mail.yahoo.com/mail_250  
(back) Subject: Hymn playing, particularly registration From: "Russ Parker" <rparker@heightscpc.org> Date: Tue, 11 Jan 2005 09:47:40 -0700   Since we're talking about hymn introductions, I'd like to raise a = related issue. =20 Having no service to play for at my own church on Christmas Day, I = decided to attend the service at a large church in my city. The regular = organist was absent, but I thought the sub was someone I recognized and = knew to be a trained organist. The service was sparsely attended and = the "choir" for the day was a quartet that struggled a bit with Darke's = setting of "In the Bleak Mid-winter." All of this surprised me, as I = had rather grand expectations. But what surprised me most was the = uninspiring hymn playing. The registration was the same from the = introduction through the final stanza (never utilizing a mixture or a = reed); and it was the same for every hymn. I should also mention that = for "O Come, All Ye Faithful," the organist played David Willcocks's = harmonizations for "Sing, choirs of angels" and "Yea, Lord we greet = thee," but even this glorious music was played with the same stops. =20 I was taught to vary registration from one stanza to the next, being = especially sensitive to the text. Is there a "school" of hymn playing = that advocates this idea of everything sounding the same? Just curious. =20 Russ Parker  
(back) Subject: Re: Hymn playing, particularly registration From: "Charles Peery" <cepeery@earthlink.net> Date: Tue, 11 Jan 2005 11:13:35 -0600 (GMT-06:00)   Could not copy the message to the digest, there was no plain text part
(back) Subject: Re: Hymn playing, particularly registration From: "Jan Nijhuis" <nijhuis@email.com> Date: Wed, 12 Jan 2005 02:01:40 +0800   A previous post had piqued my interest...   From Julian Rhodes' "The Rise and Fall of the Octopod". (http://www.ondamar= ..demon.co.uk/essays/octopod.htm)   Baron had rebelled against "the present epidemin tendency to multitudinous = and agglomerative extravagance in organs". He considered that "the office o= f the organ, in ordinary parish churches, is to direct and support the sing= ing; and that fulness, variety, and beauty, must mainly be supplied by the = well-trained voices of the choir and congregation"; therefore "one stop of = forty-nine pipes may be made sufficient to direct and support the singing o= f a large village congregation".   I should like to try that one 8' open diapason some day.   ----- Original Message ----- From: "Charles Peery"   Interesting you should bring this up. Because this discussion was sparked = by my attendance at an Anglican evensong service, and in addition to the te= rse hymn intros, the organist played every verse of every single hymn with = the exact same registration! In this particular building, though, the bulk= of the organ is a bit buried up in the Chancel, (including an en chamade h= igh up over the altar firing directly down the Nave) and there is a gallery= division at the back of the Nave. So, the introduction was played on the = Chancel organ only, and the Nave organ kicked in for the congregational sin= ging. I rationalized the sameness of registration by telling myself that p= erhaps there just weren't many choices to make on that Gallery division. B= ut you'd think there'd be some. I think it stems from a philosophical choi= ce of the organist not to insert a musical personality into the hymn singin= g. That is why I asked the question about hymn intros to begin with! Fas= cinating...   From: Russ Parker   Having no service to play for at my own church on Christmas Day, I decided = to attend the service at a large church in my city. The regular organist w= as absent, but I thought the sub was someone I recognized and knew to be a = trained organist. The service was sparsely attended and the "choir" for th= e day was a quartet that struggled a bit with Darke's setting of "In the Bl= eak Mid-winter." All of this surprised me, as I had rather grand expectati= ons. But what surprised me most was the uninspiring hymn playing. The reg= istration was the same from the introduction through the final stanza (neve= r utilizing a mixture or a reed); and it was the same for every hymn. I sh= ould also mention that for "O Come, All Ye Faithful," the organist played D= avid Willcocks's harmonizations for "Sing, choirs of angels" and "Yea, Lord= we greet thee," but even this glorious music was played with the same stop= s.   I was taught to vary registration from one stanza to the next, being especi= ally sensitive to the text.=20=20   Is there a "school" of hymn playing that advocates this idea of everything = sounding the same? Just curious.   Russ Parker   -- Jan Nijhuis nijhuis@email.com   --=20 ___________________________________________________________ Sign-up for Ads Free at Mail.com http://promo.mail.com/adsfreejump.htm    
(back) Subject: RE: Hymn playing, particularly registration From: "Dominic Scullion" <dominicscullion@email.com> Date: Tue, 11 Jan 2005 18:28:15 -0000   I can only hope that if there is such a 'school' it will be closed down quickly.   DS     _____   From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of = Russ Parker Sent: 11 January 2005 16:48 To: pipechat@pipechat.org Subject: Hymn playing, particularly registration     Since we're talking about hymn introductions, I'd like to raise a related issue.     Having no service to play for at my own church on Christmas Day, I decided to attend the service at a large church in my city. The regular organist was absent, but I thought the sub was someone I recognized and knew to be = a trained organist. The service was sparsely attended and the "choir" for = the day was a quartet that struggled a bit with Darke's setting of "In the = Bleak Mid-winter." All of this surprised me, as I had rather grand = expectations. But what surprised me most was the uninspiring hymn playing. The registration was the same from the introduction through the final stanza (never utilizing a mixture or a reed); and it was the same for every hymn. I should also mention that for "O Come, All Ye Faithful," the organist played David Willcocks's harmonizations for "Sing, choirs of angels" and "Yea, Lord we greet thee," but even this glorious music was played with = the same stops.     I was taught to vary registration from one stanza to the next, being especially sensitive to the text. Is there a "school" of hymn playing = that advocates this idea of everything sounding the same? Just curious.     Russ Parker    
(back) Subject: RE: Hymn playing, particularly registration From: "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Wed, 12 Jan 2005 08:17:28 +1300   >....therefore "one stop of forty-nine pipes may be made sufficient to direct and >support the singing of a large village congregation". >I should like to try that one 8' open diapason some day.   OK, here goes.   In the parish church on Lindisfarne, Holy Island, near Berwick-upon-Tweed, off the extreme north-east coast of England, a building seating perhaps = 300 people, there is a 3-stop Harrison & Harrison tracker of, I'm guessing, = 100 years of age. On the unenclosed manual there are just an 8ft Open Diapason and an 8ft Dulciana. The Pedal has a solitary 16ft Bourdon. The Open Diapason goes down to CC.   While not ideal, obviously, that wee organ is quite adequate to lead the singing and is at present being restored. It is well-placed, at the head = of the south aisle with its back to the stone wall, so it faces west down the nave.   Not quite what you referred, being 2 1/2 times the size (!!!), but it is a good little instrument all the same.   Ross    
(back) Subject: "pristine" From: "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Wed, 12 Jan 2005 08:22:41 +1300   Dear List,   I seems that there is a gradual shift in the meaning of "pristine" and indeed that has begun here in NZ, too.   That is a shame, as the original meaning is unambiguous and useful. There was originally no sense of pure or clear at all, and so one could say, without any misunderstanding, of a grassed-over civic rubbish dump now = used as a sports field, that if it was restored to its pristine condition, that would mean roughing up the surface and restoring it to its original = foetid, stinking, mucky, garbage-filled state, full of old cars, household waste, rotting organic matter, methane gas, perhaps some dead animals, broken bricks and concrete - you name it.   :-)   Ross    
(back) Subject: Scudamore organs and others From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Tue, 11 Jan 2005 13:03:58 -0800 (PST)   Hello,   The web site of the late Julian Rhodes is always a fascinating and rather wonderfully eleoquent place.   I can do no better than quote directly from it:-   "The Octopod first saw the light of day in the 1850s. Its creator was an English vicar, John Baron, who in 1858 published a book entitled "Scudamore organs, or practical hints respecting organs for village churches and small chancels on improved principles". This was the era when, inspired by the high-church ideals of the Oxford movement, surpliced choirs were being introduced in chancels up and down the country, and village bands were replaced by organs. New ideals of dignity and reverence began to pervade the liturgy of the church, and how better to express them than in the creation of the Octopod? The first of the species, the Adam of the Octopod race, was built to John Baron's design in his church at Upton Scudamore, Wiltshire, by Nelson Hall in 1856." To this I would add, that a number of organ builders jumped on the band-wagon, or rather, the chancel wall, and built any number of instruments of the Octopod variety. Some were rather larger, with a hint of baroque at 4ft and 2ft pitches, but all were designed for one purpose, and purpose alone, and that was to accompany the hymns in small churches; often in remote parishes.   Henry Willis built a number of "Scudamore" organs, whilst Harrison & Harrison, in the 1890's, were happy to supply a basic 8ft octopod with a single Open Diapason for as little as 25 guineas....about (US)$60 or so.   There must have been quite a ready market, and an abundance of willing patrons, happy to have their name set in stone (or at least wood and brass) for all posterity. A LOT of these small octopods and other small organs survive to this day.   Ross is absolutely right about a single Harrison "Open Diapason" filling a building and accompanying a congregation, and for good reason. Around that time, Harrison & Harrison had not come under the ghastly influence of Lt Col George Dixon, and their usual way of obtaining strong diapason tone was to use quite big scales, moderately blown and only moderately nicked.   As most country churches were not terribly well furnished and had wide rather than resonant acoustics (some WERE resonant of course), there was little to kill the noble sound of those Harrison diapasons. After all, it was the diapasons on which Harrison based their reputation, unlike Willis and his reeds.   As a boy, I often went to a village where the incumbent lady organist of some 20 years was a relative. Thus, I spent many happy hours playing a very simple, one manual Harrison organ with the following specification:-   Pedal   1 Bourdon 16     Gt - Ped Manual   2 Open Diapason 8 unenclosed   3 Lieblich Gedackt 8 enclosed 4 Dulciana 8 enclosed 5 Harmonic Flute 4 enclosed 6 Piccolo 2 enclosed   Those 6 stops were just perfect for accompaniment, the organ required tuning once a year, and being a Harrison, maintenance was restricted to oiling the blower....tracker action of course.     Blowing: Electric or hand   Of course, by the 1920/30's, Harrison & Harrison had taken a very different course, with perhaps the most extraordinary attention to regulation detail of any builders in the world. Interestingly, an Arthur Harrison organ of this era needs to be at least TWICE the size of that 6 stop organ just to be HALF as effective....and why?   Because, in the typical Anglican PC in the UK, the larger and later instruments had to be crammed under the low roofs of chancel aisles, whereas the small organs of a previous generation were usually either free standing or hung on a wall.   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK     --- TheShieling <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> wrote:   > > In the parish church on Lindisfarne, Holy Island, > near Berwick-upon-Tweed, > off the extreme north-east coast of England, a > building seating perhaps 300 > people, there is a 3-stop Harrison & Harrison > tracker of, I'm guessing, 100 > years of age     __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Read only the mail you want - Yahoo! Mail SpamGuard. http://promotions.yahoo.com/new_mail