PipeChat Digest #5076 - Wednesday, January 12, 2005
 
Re: Organ repertoire question
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: Hymn playing, particularly registration
  by "F. Richard Burt" <effarbee@verizon.net>
Re: Organ repertoire question
  by "Robert Lind" <lindr@core.com>
Re: Oceans of Strings
  by "Margo Dillard" <dillardm@airmail.net>
Re: Organ Repertoire Question/Unitarians
  by "Emily Adams" <eadams@cinci.rr.com>
more info on available on 16ft open wood
  by "John Vanderlee" <jovanderlee@vassar.edu>
In Memoriam Frank A. McConnell
  by "Karl Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu>
What's missing Competition
  by "Harry Grove" <musicman@cottagemusic.co.uk>
OK OK
  by "Harry Grove" <musicman@cottagemusic.co.uk>
Re: What's missing Competition
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
RFH and Ralph Downes
  by "alantaylor1" <alantaylor1@members.v21.co.uk>
Re: Hymn playing, particularly registration
  by "Jan Nijhuis" <nijhuis@email.com>
Psalm 90 ...
  by "Jan Nijhuis" <nijhuis@email.com>
RE: What's missing Competition
  by "Will Light" <will.light@btinternet.com>
Re: Organ repertoire question
  by "Robert Ehrhardt" <r_ehrh@bellsouth.net>
Re: Hymn playing, particularly registration
  by "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com>
RE: Organ repertoire question
  by "Emmons, Paul" <PEMMONS@wcupa.edu>
Re: OK OK
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
Re: OK OK
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Organ repertoire question From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Wed, 12 Jan 2005 03:18:46 -0800 (PST)   Hello,   The organ is certainly known in India and the harmonium especially.   I don't know of any essentially Indian organ music, but there are Indian connections.   The most obvious is the music of Messaien, where use is made of Eastern modes and Hindu rhythms; the latter requiring about 10 years of study!! The other problem is that Indian music often relies upon quarter-tones or less.   Unfortunately, the other alternative is even less attractive, unless you friend happens to be the most brilliant sight-reader in the history of music with a truly incredible technique.   In the unlikely event that this indeed be the case, then the obvious choice of music would be that composed by the mixed-race Englishmen, Sorabji, who died in 1988. Sorabji lived in the UK, had an Indian father who was an engineer in Bombay and, I believe, a Spanish mother.....all very confusing.   Other than this, I can only recommend Elgar, which would be heard throughout India when it was part of the British Empire. If one wants to be really controversial, there are a set of Lemare variations on "Rule Brittania".....that would go down like a lead balloon.   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK     --- Stephen Best <stevebest@usadatanet.net> wrote:   > Hi everyone, > > A friend of mine who plays at a Unitarian church has > asked for > suggestions for organ music she might play the week > a Hindu swami leads > a worship service at her church     __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Mail - Find what you need with new enhanced search. http://info.mail.yahoo.com/mail_250  
(back) Subject: Re: Hymn playing, particularly registration From: "F. Richard Burt" <effarbee@verizon.net> Date: Wed, 12 Jan 2005 07:33:03 -0600   Good Morning, Jan, et al: > Unless the purpose is to have the congregation participate > and sing; not to be entertained. This topic can be argued > both ways. After an few hours in church with a lot of music > and only one stop, I'd agree that things would get boring. We discussed this during Church Music class while I was in college. Among us, we agreed, we need to be sure we vary the music enough that it does not become boring. In a parallel discussion, we also challenged the idea of keeping the key centers changed. One Sunday, several years later, I worked out a service wiith my accompanist to test this idea. Every piece of music that Sunday was in the key of A-flat. At the end of the service, my accompanist said, "Yukk!!!" Point was proven. Even in staid styles, we still need some variety to keep the minds of the congregants engaged. F. Richard Burt ..    
(back) Subject: Re: Organ repertoire question From: "Robert Lind" <lindr@core.com> Date: Wed, 12 Jan 2005 07:46:03 -0600   There is a little-known, never-played, now-lost Introduction, 57 = Variations and Quadruple Fugue on the nonliturgical Chorale "Wohin, du Hindu?" for 8-manual organ with double pedal-board by Max Reger. It was the longest = work ever composed for organ until John Cage's centuries-long Orgelwerk was uncaged not too long ago, and might have been perfect for the = occasion--were it not for its unavailability and reputed unplayability.   As they say: Hope this helps.   Bob Lind   ----- Original Message -----     > Hi everyone, > > A friend of mine who plays at a Unitarian church has asked for > suggestions for organ music she might play the week a Hindu swami leads > a worship service at her church. Any ideas as to what might work with > such an occasion? > > Steve Best in Utica, NY    
(back) Subject: Re: Oceans of Strings From: "Margo Dillard" <dillardm@airmail.net> Date: Wed, 12 Jan 2005 07:51:55 -0600   I'm allowed to pick on Methodists.....I am one. Besides, as I said, according to us, it's the Baptists who are slushy, not us. I wonder who they consider slushy? Guess I shouldn't ask. Might start something... = ;-)   Bob Elms wrote: > Hey! Go easy on the Methodists (well we are called Uniting Church here > in OZ). > Our hymns for Sunday: > Praise my soul, the King of Heaven (Praise, my soul) > Praise to the Holiest in the Height (Gerontius). > Praise the Lord ye heaven adore Him (Austria) > Oh praise ye the Lord, praise him in the height. (Laudate Dominum) > Glkory be to God the Father (Regent Square) > No slush there and free harmony for the last verse where appropriate. > Bob Elms. > > ----- Original Message ----- From: "Margo Dillard" = <dillardm@airmail.net> > To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> > Sent: Tuesday, January 11, 2005 9:07 PM > Subject: Re: Oceans of Strings > > >> You know - from what all the Anglicans say, I thought Methodists >> invented it. And from what all the Methodists say, I thought Baptists >> invented it. I guess the only people we can't blame are the Church of >> Christ... >> >> Margo > > > > >     -- Dr. Margo Dillard Organist, FUMC, Lewisville, TX Musical Feast Choral Society Dillard Piano & Organ Studio    
(back) Subject: Re: Organ Repertoire Question/Unitarians From: "Emily Adams" <eadams@cinci.rr.com> Date: Wed, 12 Jan 2005 08:53:03 -0500   Steve asked for service music suggestions for a Unitarian service led by a =   Hindu, and Ron responded:   "A Hindu Swami is leading the service in a Unitarian Church? How.....about...Song of India, followed by Moon light on the Ganges and an improvised Toccata and double fugue using both tunes. Have a tubla and zitar join in for a trio sonata. :))))) You've got to be kidding."   Ron, if you go to www.uua.org and have a look around you'll probably = quickly come to understand the extent to which today's Unitarians incorporate discussion of religious faiths and traditions other than Christianity in their services. The basic notion is that there is value in all the major religions, and because of the non-creedal nature of Unitarianism its = members are actively encouraged to explore a broad range of faiths and traditions.   Steve, I have no concrete advice for your friend but would point him to = the hymnal and its many texts on the theme of ecumenicism (is that a word??) = and world unity for ideas. (The Unitarian hymnal incorporates many tunes found =   elsewhere in the Protestant tradition, but often with different texts = which reflect Unitarian philosophy.) Perhaps he could ask to select the hymns = for this particular Sunday even if he doesn't usually do so, and then play service music based on those tunes.      
(back) Subject: more info on available on 16ft open wood From: "John Vanderlee" <jovanderlee@vassar.edu> Date: Wed, 12 Jan 2005 09:51:04 -0800     the corrected # of pipes is 32, not 44 as originally thought, but then the value is in the big ones   ...............Probably about 20 years old, built by Organ Supply with chests. 32 notes. Original cost - $9000. Now, OSI wants about $20,000 to build one = new........   we'll happily consider any offer!   John V    
(back) Subject: In Memoriam Frank A. McConnell From: "Karl Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu> Date: Wed, 12 Jan 2005 11:22:37 -0500   Dear friends,   A giant among us in Lancaster PA has died at age 91. Frank A. = McConnell served 52 1/2 years as organist-choirmaster of St. James Episcopal Church here, having been a student at St. Thomas, NYC, with T. Tertius Noble and having served parishes in Middletown CT and Neward NJ. The respect in = which he was held by his famous teacher at St. Thomas is evident in Noble's dedication to Frank of his organ work "Legend" (Galaxy Music Corp, NYC, 1944), of which I cherish a copy.   Frank upheld high standards of Anglican music and practice at St. = James, including for many years a choir of boys and men until the realities of = that within Lancaster society simply mitigated against him. He often joined forces with the late Reginald Lunt of nearby First Presbyterian Church in the performance of large choral works at either church, with their joint performances of Bach's _Passion According to St. Matthew_ among them -- a rare undertaking in a small rural-area city like Lancaster. The two were honored some years ago when the Lancaster AGO chapter created the Lunt-McConnell scholarship fund for the support of organ students from the Lancaster area.   McConnell taught Church music courses for about 40 years at Lancaster theological Seminary and conducted the seminary choir. My first time ever to see him was in a concert by that group in a (then) Evangelical and Reformed church in Lebanon Co., PA. He also edited the hymnal _Sing To = the Lord_ for the E&R denomination. He composed numerous choral works.   He was a Fellow of the AGO, founding dean of the Lancaster AGO = chapter, and its dean 1948 - 1951 and again 1962 - 1964. He planned, led and = played the music for the opening festival service of the 1967 AGO regional convention in Lancaster.   Frank married The Rev. Beatrice Weaver in 1958, and upon retirement = the two became members of Hamilton Park U.C.C. Church, Lancaster, where his funeral will be held on Saturday at 11 a.m., with a viewing both Friday night 6:30 p 8:30 at Groff Funeral Home and at the church an hour before = the funeral. Memorial gifts are invited to the   Frank A. McConnell Endowment Fund for the Study of Church Music Office of Development Lancaster Theological Seminary 555 West James Street Lancaster PA 17603   Frank was the last of the great "old-timers" in Lancaster's Church = music and organ music scene within the memory of persons still living: Harry Sykes, Reginald Lunt, Harold Schaar and Marie Gast, Helen Nuss, Prof. Bankert, Dale Hershey, etc. Now they are all gone.   May he rest in peace.   Cordially,   Karl E. Moyer Lancaster    
(back) Subject: What's missing Competition From: "Harry Grove" <musicman@cottagemusic.co.uk> Date: Wed, 12 Jan 2005 16:53:03 -0000   Further to the "Good News" of the new organ to be built in Birmingham = (GB) for the Royal College of Organists new Headquarters building (Curzon = Street) in what is now called the 'Eastside'......   You really should read the description of the new building (or re-building =   of the historic (listed) railway terminus) and the surrounding area......   "International focal point" ....... "better than anywhere else in the = world" ......."superb technical precision" ...... "impeccable tonal finishing" ....... "outstanding case-work" ...... "exquisite case" ..... "in harmony with the building's interior design" ..... "interfacing with the superbly landscaped public spaces surrounding the hall"   MUST HAVE BEEN WRITTEN BY A REAL-ESTATE AGENT !   (and the previous attempt to 'landscape Curzon Street' was by the = Luftwaffe who were attacking the goods and shunting yards).   SPECIFICATION   GREAT C-c4 POSITIVE C-c4 SWELL C-c4 PEDAL C-g1 (Concave, radiating)   Praestant 16' Principal 8' Bourdon 16' Principalbass 16' Principal 8' Koppelflote 8' Cor de Nuit 8' Violonbass 16' Gamba 8' Flauto dolce 8' Flute harmonique 8' = Subbass 16' Gedackt 8' Octavo 4; Gambe 8' Octavbass 8' Doppelflote 8' Rohrflute 4' Viox celeste 8' Violoncello 8' Octave 4' Sesquialtera II Fugara 4' Bourdon 8' Spitaflote 4' Doublette 2' Flute octaviante 4' Octave 4' Quinte 2 2/3 Larigot 1 1/3' Nasard 2 2/3' Mixtur 2 2/3 IV Octave 2' Scharf 1' IV Octavin 2' Pousane 16' Cornett 8' V Cromome 8' Tierce 1 3/5' Trompete 8' Trompete 8' Voix humaine 8' Plein jeu 2' V Basson 16' Trem. Trem. Trompete harmonique = 8' Hautbois 8' Clarion 4'   Trem. PLUS COUPLERS   Pos > Gt Sw>Gt Sw 16'>Gt Sw>Pos Gt>Ped Pos>Ped Sw>Ped   NOW THE QUESTION IS THIS = .................................................. !   One stop is missing from this Spec. (as published) and, before I ring them =   up and ask what it might be, I ask you all, .... "WHAT (stop) IS MISSING ?"   Yours, quiuzically,   Harry Grove [a.k.a. a musicman, too poor to put up a prize]    
(back) Subject: OK OK From: "Harry Grove" <musicman@cottagemusic.co.uk> Date: Wed, 12 Jan 2005 16:59:13 -0000   OK, OK   Before all you clever folks start saying - "Well, the Pedal division's missing !" well it isn't.   So there; it's just the conversion to "Plain text" - which some keep = carping on about - does wicked things to the formating of my list.   Those with time, skill, patience and understanding will make the effort to =   work it out for themselves.   Harry Grove [a.k.a. a musicman who even reads his own postings]    
(back) Subject: Re: What's missing Competition From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Wed, 12 Jan 2005 12:02:58 EST   The stoplist is not readable as presented.  
(back) Subject: RFH and Ralph Downes From: "alantaylor1" <alantaylor1@members.v21.co.uk> Date: Wed, 12 Jan 2005 17:11:57 -0000   I would like to draw the attention of members of this forum, to the very interesting and informative article, by William McVicker, in BIOS Journal Volume 28 published in 2004. This article explains, in great detail, why I dislike the RFH organ so much. It also gives me hope, that when the organ returns after the hall is rebuilt, it might well sound like a musical instrument. This article also plots the changes in thinking of Ralph = Downes as the years passed by. I am very grateful to William McVicker for his = well thought out and researched article.     The BIOS journal can be obtained from Positif Press of Oxford.     Alan Taylor       -- No virus found in this outgoing message. Checked by AVG Anti-Virus. Version: 7.0.300 / Virus Database: 265.6.10 - Release Date: 10/01/2005  
(back) Subject: Re: Hymn playing, particularly registration From: "Jan Nijhuis" <nijhuis@email.com> Date: Thu, 13 Jan 2005 01:18:54 +0800   Even in an equally tempered world, changing your tonal center from a flat k= ey, to a sharp one (G, D, A, E, B, or (God Forbid) F#) will change the perc= eption of the music as being brighter.   Why that is? ...   ----- Original Message ----- From: "F. Richard Burt" <effarbee@verizon.net> > One Sunday, several years later, I worked out a service wiith > my accompanist to test this idea. Every piece of music that > Sunday was in the key of A-flat. At the end of the service, > my accompanist said, "Yukk!!!" Point was proven.   -- Jan Nijhuis nijhuis@email.com   --=20 ___________________________________________________________ Sign-up for Ads Free at Mail.com http://promo.mail.com/adsfreejump.htm    
(back) Subject: Psalm 90 ... From: "Jan Nijhuis" <nijhuis@email.com> Date: Thu, 13 Jan 2005 01:24:55 +0800   Does anyone have a suggestion for a "learnable in short order" setting of P= salm 90? Looking for an offertory for this coming Sunday, Sermon title: "Wh= en Disaster Strikes."   -- Jan Nijhuis nijhuis@email.com   --=20 ___________________________________________________________ Sign-up for Ads Free at Mail.com http://promo.mail.com/adsfreejump.htm    
(back) Subject: RE: What's missing Competition From: "Will Light" <will.light@btinternet.com> Date: Wed, 12 Jan 2005 17:50:51 -0000   How's this? Not sure about the Basson 16' Is it on the Swell or on the Pedal? The rest looks more or less in the right place to me... But what = stop is Harry on about? A Dulciana on the great maybe? Or a Cornopean on the Swell? Or a 4' reed on the pedal???? Who knows?   Will Light Coventry UK   -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of Harry Grove SNIP     SPECIFICATION   GREAT C-c4 POSITIVE C-c4 SWELL C-c4 PEDAL C-g1=20 (Concave, radiating)   Praestant 16' Principal 8' Bourdon 16' Principalbass 16' Principal 8' Koppelflote 8' Cor de Nuit 8' Violonbass 16' Gamba 8' Flauto dolce 8' Flute harmonique 8' Subbass 16' Gedackt 8' Octavo 4' Gambe 8' Octavbass 8' Doppelflote 8' Rohrflute 4' Voix celeste 8' Violoncello 8' Octave 4' Sesquialtera II Fugara 4' Bourdon 8' Spitaflote 4' Doublette 2' Flute octaviante 4' Octave 4' Quinte 2 2/3 Larigot 1 1/3' Nasard 2 2/3' Mixtur 2 2/3 IV Octave 2' Scharf 1' IV Octavin 2' Pousane 16' Cornett 8' V Cromome 8' Tierce 1 3/5' Trompete 8' Trompete 8' Voix humaine 8' Plein jeu 2' V =20 Trem. Trem. Basson 16' Trompete harmonique 8' Hautbois 8' Clairon 4' Trem. PLUS COUPLERS   Pos > Gt Sw>Gt Sw 16'>Gt Sw>Pos Gt>Ped Pos>Ped Sw>Ped   NOW THE QUESTION IS THIS = ...................................................=20 !   One stop is missing from this Spec. (as published) and, before I ring = them=20 up and ask what it might be, I ask you all, .... "WHAT (stop) IS MISSING ?"   Yours, quiuzically,   Harry Grove [a.k.a. a musicman, too poor to put up a prize]=20      
(back) Subject: Re: Organ repertoire question From: "Robert Ehrhardt" <r_ehrh@bellsouth.net> Date: Wed, 12 Jan 2005 12:53:26 -0500   Perhaps Jehan Alain: Deux Danses a Agni Vavishta? > > From: Stephen Best <stevebest@usadatanet.net> > Date: 2005/01/11 Tue PM 11:25:13 EST > To: Pipe organ list <PIPORG-L@LISTSERV.ALBANY.EDU>, PipeChat > <pipechat@pipechat.org> > Subject: Organ repertoire question > > Hi everyone, > > A friend of mine who plays at a Unitarian church has asked for > suggestions for organ music she might play the week a Hindu swami leads > a worship service at her church. Any ideas as to what might work with > such an occasion? > > Steve Best in Utica, NY     Robert Ehrhardt Noel Memorial UMC Shreveport, LA USA http://www.zimbel.com/ehrhardt.html    
(back) Subject: Re: Hymn playing, particularly registration From: "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com> Date: Wed, 12 Jan 2005 11:53:17 -0800 (PST)     Written by a lister:   > Unless the purpose is to have the congregation participate > and sing; not to be entertained. This topic can be argued > both ways. After an few hours in church with a lot of music > and only one stop, I'd agree that things would get boring.     Of course, the object of exciting hymn playing is not to put the focus on = the organist, but to enhance worship. I enjoy hymn playing just as much as = I enjoy playing literature, and practice it just as much. Who else = practives hymn playing just as they do their repertoire?   Registrations need not be dull, as that's what makes them bring in the = drumsets, IMHO. Even with contemplative tunes (ie Dear Lord and Father of = Mankind, Come Risen Lord and Deign to be Our Guest) we can be colorful = with registrations. Some organists play last verses of contemplative texts = with "caged rage" to good results (when a more full sound is needed for = support)   Registering 3-verse hymns is a nice way to practice registration, = particularly when the hymn is a hymn of praise. Of course, one might not = start this out with a FF register, but may use an F for verse one, Caged = Rage for verse 2 while pulling/tapping stops on, and then FF for verse 3.   5 verse hymns also offer chances for creativity for one to do something = different. FF V-1, F Verse 2, some hand registration and creativity for 3, = caged rage verse 4, FF verse 5.   Does anyone here change manuals during the singing more festive hymn tunes = in the midde of verses? That can also add some variety...switching to the = Sw or Ch/Pos with SW to Pos/ch on, and relieving the pedal.   TDH     --------------------------------- Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Mail - now with 250MB free storage. Learn more.
(back) Subject: RE: Organ repertoire question From: "Emmons, Paul" <PEMMONS@wcupa.edu> Date: Wed, 12 Jan 2005 16:51:31 -0500   > A friend of mine who plays at a Unitarian church has asked for=20 > suggestions for organ music she might play the week a Hindu swami = leads=20 > a worship service at her church. Any ideas as to what might work = with=20 > such an occasion?   > Perhaps Jehan Alain: Deux Danses a Agni Vavishta?   A very good suggestion, and practical.   For what it's worth, less practically:   "Hyperion, or the rhetoric of fire" by Guillou, especially the final = movement "Agni-Ignis".   Some of the organ works of Sorabji (three huge organ symphonies) might = also be fitting-- is anyone familiar enough with him or them to be more = specific?   New Grove describes Sorabji as "the son of a Spanish-Sicilian mother and = a Parsi father." (Parsi =3D Indian but of Persian background, and = typically Zoroastrian religion.) So where does that put this composer = vis-=E0-vis Hinduism? I'm not sure specifically although in general = he's worth investigating for such a situation as the inquirer describes. =     The article goes on to say that he "had no patience" with many = 20th-century musical innovations such as electronics, serialism, and = indeterminacy, as well as with "vernacular music of any kind." His own = music and that which he admired showed "deep mystical qualities... he = considered the acts of composition and performance intensely sacred, and = the best music to be suitable only for initiates, not the uncultured = masses." Of independent means, exacting, and reclusive, he had neither = any need nor often any desire for his own music to be performed at all, = preferring silence to "travesty."   His fellow English (as he was officially, although he didn't like to be = considered such) must have been found him outrageously exotic in every = respect. I for one have not heard any of his music but am interested, = especially as per the New Grove article we're kindred spirits in some = ways. It's pleasantly surprising that it runs to about two pages, longer = than one would expect for a little-unknown composer. With the ongoing = meltdown of interest in serialism and a few other disastrous _sine quae = non_ of respectability that held forth in mid-20th-century music = criticism and teaching, various composers that had marched to a = different drummer and suffered the consequent disdain are now up for = reconsideration. Sorabji appears to be among these, along with Busoni, = whom he championed. He also loved Mahler's music, whose popularity = today was barely imaginable fifty years ago.   There remain, of course, the enormous technical difficulties of his = music. But so it was found of Beethoven's works, Liszt's, Busoni's, = Medtner's, etc. in their respective times. Marcel Dupre's feat of = memorizing all the organ works of Bach was a stupendous innovation. = While it certainly remains well beyond the abilities of most of us day = laborers in the vineyard, after Dupre had done it quite a few other = organists found that they could do it, too. His student Jeanne = Demessieux memorized far more, and confidently enough that when she = toured America she left all her scores at home. For a decade or two = after Albert Einstein published his theory of special relativity, it is = said that you could count on your hands the number of scientists in the = world who understood it; but now it's standard equipment for anyone = getting a degree in physics. In sports there is the five and = four-minute mile, etc.   Why am I going into all this? Well, because there seems to be a = roundabout Hindu connexion in the rather neo-LaMarckian British = biologist Rupert Sheldrake, who has developed a hypothesis that explains = these phenomena. These ideas began to occur to him while he was working = in India and had met the syncretistic mystic monastic Bede Griffith. = This influence resulted in Sheldrake's conversion from atheism to a = more-than-perfunctory Anglicanism, and spiritual matters are important = both in his life and his work. He lived in Griffith's ashram for two = years, wrote his first book there (_A New Science of Life_) and = dedicated it to Griffith.   Griffith's spirituality combined Christian and Hindu elements, and he is = well respected in both religions. Such a synthesis and its influence = might interest a Unitarian congregation hosting a Hindu guest.  
(back) Subject: Re: OK OK From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Wed, 12 Jan 2005 16:57:13 EST   Dear Harry:   There are a couple of things missing that I can see. One of them may be by preference Doppel Flute 8' instead of a Flute Harmonic, but in the jumble I'd say the Mixtures on the Great. Because of auto wrapping the pedal mixture shows in that column instead. It's also strange to see a Spitz Fl. 4' instead of an open Fl. 4' . This is essentially more French than British stop list wise, so why the half measures which make little sense. I'd say the great needs work. Just reading between the lines, literally.   Ron Severin    
(back) Subject: Re: OK OK From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net> Date: Wed, 12 Jan 2005 16:54:18 -0600   I'm tired of waiting for someone else to do it, so here is the stoplist of the new Goll organ to be built for the Royal College of Organists printed = in a way that I hope everyone will be able to understand:   GREAT:   16' Praestant 8' Principal 8' Gamba 8' Gedackt 8' Doppelflote 4' Octave 4' Spitzflote 2.2/3' Quinte 2' Octave 1.1/3' Mixture IV 8' Cornet V 8' Trompete   SWELL (enclosed):   16' Bourdon 8' Gambe 8' Voix Celeste 8' Flute Harmonique 8' Cor de Nuit 4' Fugara 4' Flute Octaviante 2.2/3' Nazard 2' Octavin 1.3/5' Tierce 2' Plein Jeu V 16' Basson 8' Trompette Harmonique 8' Hautbois 4' Clairon   POSITIVE (enclosed):   8' Principal 8' Koppelflote 8' Flauto Dolce 4' Octave 4' Rohrflote 2' Doublette 1.1.3/ Larigot 2.2/3' + 1.3/5' Sesquialtera II 1' Scharf IV 8' Cromorne 8' Voix Humaine   PEDAL:   16' Principalbass 16' Violonbass 16' Subbass 8' Octavbass 8' Violoncello 8' Bourdon 4' Octave 2.2/3' Mixture IV 16' Posaune 8' Trompete   John Speller