PipeChat Digest #5084 - Friday, January 14, 2005
 
Re: Etymology of "Swan Song" Was: "Praise Songs" as heard ...
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
RE: Tonal Styles
  by "Will Light" <will.light@btinternet.com>
Re: Sorabji
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
RE: Richer Content In Praise Songs
  by "Will Light" <will.light@btinternet.com>
RE: harmonic flutes
  by "Will Light" <will.light@btinternet.com>
RE: "Praise Songs" as heard by those who don't like them
  by "Will Light" <will.light@btinternet.com>
Re: Richer Content In Praise Songs
  by "John Vanderlee" <jovanderlee@vassar.edu>
Re: harmonic flutes
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net>
Re: harmonic flutes
  by <Steskinner@aol.com>
RE: Richer Content In Praise Songs
  by "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
more on 16' open wood and a Quint available
  by "John Vanderlee" <jovanderlee@vassar.edu>
Re: "Praise Songs" as heard by an outside observer
  by "Richard Schneider" <arpschneider@starband.net>
"so much good renewal music"
  by "Robert Lind" <lindr@core.com>
Re: "so much good renewal music"
  by "Jonathan Orwig" <giwro@adelphia.net>
Re: Sorabji
  by "Jonathan Orwig" <giwro@adelphia.net>
Re: Silliness: (Re: "Praise Songs" as heard ... )
  by "Margo Dillard" <dillardm@airmail.net>
Johannus Opus 1405
  by <robian@esc.net.au>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Etymology of "Swan Song" Was: "Praise Songs" as heard ... From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Fri, 14 Jan 2005 02:12:48 -0800 (PST)   Glenda,   The silver swan, which living made no note, as death approached, unlocked her tiny throat leaning her breast against the reedy shore, thus spake her first, and last, and spake no more. Farewell all joys,O death, come close mine eyes, More geese than swans now live, more fools than wise.     Some minor English writer or other, set to music by Orlando Gibbons.   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK     --- Jan Nijhuis <nijhuis@email.com> wrote:     > > Swan Song > > There is a legend that swans sing an exquisitely > beautiful song just before dying     __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Mail - now with 250MB free storage. Learn more. http://info.mail.yahoo.com/mail_250  
(back) Subject: RE: Tonal Styles From: "Will Light" <will.light@btinternet.com> Date: Fri, 14 Jan 2005 10:15:17 -0000   What about Theatre Organs? They have a totally different style, and = between different builders there are discernable differences too; e.g. = Wurlitzer; Barton; Compton; Christie...   Will Light Coventry UK   -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of = Alex Hendrickson Sent: 13 January 2005 17:44 To: PipeChat Subject: Re: Tonal Styles   I don't normally reply to people who just start making non-sense of my worthwhile questions, but here goes....   If you believe Richard is right, that's fine, but you must not have read my post close enough, he is severely mistaken in thinking that I was speaking on the subject of the different musical compositional styles, like as to whether the song (no matter what instrument it was played on) sounded more French, German or this or that...... It was not that, he's wrong, I was speaking on the tonal designs that are present in organs these days, the different designs that make the organs sound different from others.   FYI, you're wrong, there are not that many general styles, each style can be summarized easily... If you wish to concur, I'd appreciate YOUR list of all current tonal styles, if you have a theory, whether it be correct or not, you must have the legitimate info to back it up....   BTW, Nobody appreciates a smartallic or a know-it-all,   ~Alex     On Thu, 13 Jan 2005 09:37:10 -0800 (PST), Colin Mitchell <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> wrote: > Hello, >=20 > Richard Burt is quite right. >=20 > Like all "styles" they are but a rough guide to the > universe. >=20 > Baroque? >=20 > What baroque? >=20 > North German Baroque perhaps? Schnitger etc >=20 > South German Baroque? Silbermann (who put pedals to > French Baroque organs) >=20 > Dutch Baroque? Broadly voiced, generous scales very > full flutes >=20 > French Baroque? The coloured tones of Cliquot >=20 > Spanish Baroque? Very flute-like Principals and > barking reeds >=20 > Italian Baroque? Bright and chirpy, but of no great > power >=20 > English Baroque? Schmidt, Harris or Snetzler....the > choice is yours. (Think German, Italian & Dutch) >=20 > Late Southern German Baroque - Holzey etc >=20 > Early romantic baroque? Bit of a misnomer, but as > late as 1850, the Dutch and Germans were still > building essentially baroque instruments, but with > more power. >=20 > The list goes on...and on....and on..... >=20 > "Styles" are what organ historians love so much, but > in reality, there are as many "styles" as there are > organ builders. >=20 > Regards, >=20 > Colin Mitchell UK (Playing neo-baroque in Dutch > baroque style, but made in the UK using UK/Dutch > pipework). >=20 > --- "F. Richard Burt" <effarbee@verizon.net> wrote: >=20 > > Hello, Alex: > > > > When you allow only these "styles," you imply that > > musical > > style resides exclusively within the liturgical > > church traditions. >=20 > =20 > __________________________________ > Do you Yahoo!? > Yahoo! Mail - now with 250MB free storage. Learn more. > http://info.mail.yahoo.com/mail_250 >=20 > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> >=20 >=20     --=20 Alex Hendrickson   St. Paul's RC Church, Johnston City, Illinois St. Joseph's RC Church, Benton, Illinois   ****************************************************************** "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org>    
(back) Subject: Re: Sorabji From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Fri, 14 Jan 2005 02:21:19 -0800 (PST)   Hello,   Phew!   That's a long concert Jonathan!   Your stamina impresses me.   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK   --- Jonathan Orwig <giwro@adelphia.net> wrote:     > HOWever.... I _did_ find recently that some of his > less formal piano > pieces were enjoyable to me.... > Bear in mind, that is 17 years later after hearing > Sorabji for the first > time.       __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? The all-new My Yahoo! - What will yours do? http://my.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: RE: Richer Content In Praise Songs From: "Will Light" <will.light@btinternet.com> Date: Fri, 14 Jan 2005 11:04:15 -0000   Jonathan has a good point here. The rot set in here in the UK, at our = church at any rate, with the adoption of "Songs of Fellowship" around 1994. (It = was originally published in 1991). On close examination I found that it contained a mass of what I call "pap" - you all understand what I mean = by that. But amongst the pap were a few, just a very few, not much more = than a handful of quite good singable new songs with some claim to have some theological relevance in the text. I am thinking of such gems as = "Alleluia, Alleluia, give thanks to the risen Lord", "Be Still", "Brother, let me = be your servant", "Lord Jesus Christ", even "Shine, Jesus Shine". However = many of the hymns included are old favourite standards, such as "Holy, Holy, Holy, Lord God Almighty" or "How Great Thou Art" which equal in number = the pap items at least. So we paid out good money for a load of what we = already had in existing hymnals, plus a handful of new songs and a load of = unusable pap. As if this were not bad enough, in 1998 along came Volume II of = "Songs of Fellowship". I refused to buy myself a copy until in 2003 I saw one = in the "bargain bin" at the Christian Bookshop, reduced from about =A335 to =A38.50. I jokingly said to someone at church, they must be remaindering = them because nobody wants any more of this stuff. I was stunned when they replied, "Oh no- it's because Volume III has come out". Sure enough - a = week or two later, Volume III appeared on the organ bench! Words failed me! = This collection now has about 1700 hymns and songs, of which I would estimate around 20 or 30 are useable good new ones, 700 or so are old standards = we already have in our standard hymnal and about 1000 duds which are = unusable! The publishing houses are working on the same basis as the pop music industry- issue hundreds, most of which will flop, in the hopes that the = odd one will become a "hit" some day! I resent the church wasting its money on these collections, but I don't = have any say in the matter... It is not that the old hymnals, and I know = three British Methodist ones fairly well, published in 1910, 1932 and 1983, = are full of gems, it is just that the percentage of usable ones are so low = in the new collections, and that they contain so much repetition of = standards.   Will Light Coventry UK   -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of Jonathan Orwig Sent: 13 January 2005 22:47 To: PipeChat Subject: Re: Richer Content In Praise Songs   I should stay out of this debate, really....   But I can't... it is a reality of life, and something I've spent a long = =20 time formulating my opinions on.   First of all, let me say my heart goes out to you who have seen your =20 worship style obliterated by a new pastor, or one just returned from the latest =   church growth conference...   I think I've been remiss in not making it clear that I think the above = is =20 (in nearly all cases) Not a Good Idea, especially if the church is growing = and =20 thriving as it is..   I also know when this topic arises, emotions get the better of our = logic, =20 and we fail to think clearly... several of you have responded knee-jerk fashion, = and =20 it's clear you did not get my point.   - I have never denigrated traditional worship, only worship of ANY style = =20 done poorly. - Saying all of the contemporary stuff is utter crap and worthless to = God =20 is very shaky ground... YOU may not find it moving, and YOU are welcome = to =20 make that judgement as it pertains to YOU... if it feels like by doing =20 this style, you are not giving your best to God, then by all means, DO =20 SOMETHING THAT DOES - There is throw-away music in all styles... one person wrote privately =   that perhaps 10% of this will stand the test of time... I'd agree =20 wholeheartedly... I collect hymnals, and 85-90% of the music in some of =   them is either unknown or rarely sung...   In summary:   (how many times amd ways do I have to say this before people will read = it =20 and UNDERSTAND?)   I am not in disfavor of traditional music or worship - I DEPLORE worship = =20 of any style when done sloppily, without preparation and for reasons = other =20 than glorifying God. My main point was (and is) to IMPLORE you all not = to =20 make blanket statements and judgements about Praise bands and that genre = =20 of music. That is only taking a slice of the data and your bad =20 experiences (those which support your conclusion) upon which to base =20 conclusions. As respectfully as possible I must suggest that this is = poor =20 logic, bad scholarship, and serves only to further divide us on the =20 issue. Please, know that I respect your opinions, am sympathetic to = those =20 of you who have endured emotional, spiritual and financial hardship as a = =20 result of changing styles. Please, do not lump all of us Praise Band =20 leaders and our contemporary worship services together... some of us =20 really do try to do this to the best of our ability and in a manner that = =20 is worthy. I don't demand that you like what I do (or even agree with =20 it!), but I would ask that you at least try to honor the work I put into = =20 doing it to the best of my ability   Peace,   -Jonathan   Using Opera's revolutionary e-mail client: http://www.opera.com/m2/   ****************************************************************** "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org>    
(back) Subject: RE: harmonic flutes From: "Will Light" <will.light@btinternet.com> Date: Fri, 14 Jan 2005 11:29:59 -0000   I don't know what the Harmonic Flutes are like in the USA, but mine here = in the UK is probably the best stop on the organ. It has a very sweet tone = yet with a hint of edge which makes it very useful, both as a solo stop and, used with the Hohl Flute 8, as an accompaniment for a quiet stanza of a hymn. If it was simply "flutey" without the edge, I don't think it would support singing as well, as the 4' tone would not sing through and I am convinced that it is 4' tone which is responsible for giving the good = "lead" to congregational singing.   Will Light Coventry UK   -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of TheShieling Sent: 14 January 2005 02:27 To: 'PipeChat' Subject: RE: harmonic flutes     >Ross, my friend. I think we need to have a fund set up, so as we can = buy you hearing aides. Or are you wearing your biretta over your ears. (grin)   Alan, my very good friend, I wouldn't wear a biretta, no way, ever....   Hearing aides? Or do you mean hearing aids? In any event, I can assure = you my ears are very acute indeed in terms of tone (I wish my keyboard techniques were as good, but that will never happen).=20   And the above is before asking, again, why do people like harmonic = flutes these days?   Ross           ****************************************************************** "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org>    
(back) Subject: RE: "Praise Songs" as heard by those who don't like them From: "Will Light" <will.light@btinternet.com> Date: Fri, 14 Jan 2005 11:34:26 -0000   I believe the phrase originated from the old belief that the swan, which = is normally a silent bird, sang just once, immediately before its death... Actually, of course, the swan is not completely silent; it issues an angry quacking sound if you are not quick enough with the bread to feed it on = the river Avon at Stratford by the Shakespeare Memorial Theatre!   Will Light Coventry UK   -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of Glenda SNIP!   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com   P.S. Can anyone tell me the etymology of the term "swan song"? I'm using it in a letter.           ****************************************************************** "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org>    
(back) Subject: Re: Richer Content In Praise Songs From: "John Vanderlee" <jovanderlee@vassar.edu> Date: Fri, 14 Jan 2005 08:35:04 -0800   >That's the kind of thing that would have led me away from church! > >Then again, we've got a church member who mentions (often) that >Amazing Grace fits with the tune of Gilligan's Island. The fact that >the meter of the music fits the words doesn't make the two go >together. > >I'm sure you ment that a tango, in and of itself, isn't 'silly'; >mixing the meaningful words of a sacred song and a popular tune is. > >----- Original Message ----- >From: "Larry Wheelock" <llwheels@mac.com> > >> When I was a youngster at church camp in the 1960's the staff was >> fond of making us sing the Doxology to the tune of "Hernado's >> Hideaway." >> >> The fact that the text was traditional and of high quality did >> nothing to disguise the fact that the music was just silly. >> >> That lesson still applies. >> > > Larry Wheelock   Yes! as heard on Garrison Keelor's " Prairie home companion" recently.   It was funny in THAT context, albeit a bit irreverent...   George Wright does a great "Hernanado.......!" how's that for staying on topic? ;)   John V  
(back) Subject: Re: harmonic flutes From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net> Date: Fri, 14 Jan 2005 08:01:07 -0600   In the past most Harmonic Flutes have been rather similar to English ones = -- not unlike a Father Willis example. More recently, however, the tendency has been to use rather wider scales and voice them more to the max, resulting in Harmonic Flutes rather more like Cavaill=E9-Coll examples. = Also the tendency here -- as in England -- has been for mostly 4 ft. Harmonic Flutes, but today the trend is toward more 8 ft. ones. A typical new = organ will have the equivalent of the four French "fonds" on the Great -- 8 ft. Open Diapason, 8 ft. Harmonic Flute, 8 ft. Stopped Diapason and 8 ft. = Viola da Gamba.   John Speller   ----- Original Message ----- From: "Will Light" <will.light@btinternet.com> To: "'PipeChat'" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Friday, January 14, 2005 5:29 AM Subject: RE: harmonic flutes     I don't know what the Harmonic Flutes are like in the USA, but mine here = in the UK is probably the best stop on the organ.      
(back) Subject: Re: harmonic flutes From: <Steskinner@aol.com> Date: Fri, 14 Jan 2005 10:03:26 EST   In a message dated 1/13/2005 3:33:10 PM Eastern Standard Time, TheShieling@xtra.co.nz writes: Even if I had 45 to 50 stops, I'd not include a harmonic flute at all as there are so many more useful stops.   <snip> Yes, I expect a heap of comments in favour of harmonic flutes: I'd really like to hear reasoned arguments and not just a heap of "I love it" = remarks. Fire away! :-) I designed a 21 rank organ at St Philip the Apostle in Pasadena, CA some years ago, and included a 4' harmonic flute in the Swell. The stopped 8 = and open 4 flutes make for a robust accompaniment, and the 4' alone w/trem is = GORGEOUS!   I thot the blend was fine. Ditto for the exact same arrangement on our = 5/103 Schantz/Skinner.     Steven Skinner Minister of Music First Presbyterian Church of the Covenant Erie, PA  
(back) Subject: RE: Richer Content In Praise Songs From: "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Sat, 15 Jan 2005 04:28:12 +1300   >The rot set in here in the UK, at our church at any rate, with the adoption of "Songs of Fellowship" around 1994. (It = was originally published in 1991).   Sadly, most sadly, yea verily, sadly indeed (in my most terribly humble opinion) the parish I've retired to has this thing as its basic hymnbook, brought in about 10 years ago by the Vicar of the time. I agree with everything you've said about it, with the additional comments that even amongst the "standard" stuff in it, words are often changed for no = apparent reason, and that reharmonisation (always to something "simpler") and transposition downwards are common. YUK! [big snips]   >This collection now has about 1700 hymns and songs, of which I would estimate around 20 or 30 are useable good new ones, 700 or so are old standards we already have in our standard hymnal and about 1000 duds which are = unusable!   So true, again.   Ross    
(back) Subject: more on 16' open wood and a Quint available From: "John Vanderlee" <jovanderlee@vassar.edu> Date: Fri, 14 Jan 2005 11:10:42 -0800   Hello Pipechatters,   Yesterday I inspected the 16' open wood mentioned earlier. Sadly it was damaged by water infiltration. Although much of it appears salvageable ( some pipes now in "kit" form) and many of the 32 notes are ok. The big "C" needs to have at least one side replaced and the large mitres came loose. The chest I was only able to inspect partially, so it is a question mark.   Pipes and chest were built by OSI 20 years ago for a cost of $10,000.00 and never used. Today's cost about $20,000.00. Truly a sad ending.   If a brave soul is interested, I think it could be had for just about anything. Email me Privately. Location: North NJ.   On the positive side, we found some nice metal pipework, and are still negotiating for it. We were allowed to place one sample on Ebay: A mint condition Quintadena<> rank.   <http://cm.ebay.com/cm/ck/1065-22702-9746-0?uid=3D7731690&site=3D0&ver=3DLC= 080104B&lk=3DViewItem&Item=3D3776057970>http://cm.ebay.com/cm/ck/1065-22702= -9746-0?uid=3D7731690&site=3D0&ver=3DLC080104B&lk=3DViewItem&Item=3D3776057= 970   John V
(back) Subject: Re: "Praise Songs" as heard by an outside observer From: "Richard Schneider" <arpschneider@starband.net> Date: Fri, 14 Jan 2005 10:23:23 -0600 (Central Standard Time)   On 01/13/05 @18:27:08, Carla wrote to PipeChat: -------Original Message------- > I agree with what you've said. Another thing that bothers me about this > type of music is that somtimes when I hear one of the songs, I am fooled > into thinking it is a "regular" love song. The lyrics talk about love = and > yearning in such a way that I think it is about a male-female = relationship   > Then later in the song, God or Jesus is mentioned, and , I don't know, I > just feel kind of weird--like I've been deceived. One particularly offensive song of that ilk is entitled "Into the = Chamber".     Of course, just the title has particular meaning for Organbuilders! :o) In fact, one time, I started singing the opening bars of that to one of my co-workers who was familiar with the song as we were going "into the = chamber (and organ chamber, that is!) and he nearly fell of the ladder laughing = so hard.   Anyway, the words of this song are such that if you changed just ONE word, it would immediately change from a "love song to God" to a pure, unadulterated sex song!   I sometimes wonder if people never stop to just READ what the words say, rather than mindlessly mumbling them.   Fortunately, I managed to get singing of it STOPPED when I pointed this = out a number of years ago.   Rich  
(back) Subject: "so much good renewal music" From: "Robert Lind" <lindr@core.com> Date: Fri, 14 Jan 2005 10:37:38 -0600   I'd like to know the names of these composers who have written "so much = good renewal music." And while you're at it, perhaps you could tell me = specifically what they've written that one might use during the season = some of us are currently in. What have they written for the Epiphany of = our Lord, the flight into Egypt, the 12-year-old Christ in the temple, = the baptism of Christ, the marriage at Cana, etc., etc.? And what do = these folks have in store for us for Ash Wednesday, Sundays of Lent, and = Holy Week? Tell me about the number of vocal parts and the = instrumentation for these various pieces of music, too, please.   Thanks,   Robert Lind (who this summer may go to his first regional AGO regional = convention since 1965--I hope that's not TOO excessive!)=20     ----- Original Message -----=20 From: T.Desiree' Hines=20 To: PipeChat=20 Sent: Thursday, January 13, 2005 3:20 PM Subject: Re: Richer Content In Praise Songs     If I recall correctly...Ein Fieste Burg was Contemporary for its = time...a bar song I think. While all the wonderful forms of traditional = music have lasted, there is still so much good renewal music out there, = but are we going to the conferences that have that music? Does anyone = else on the list even know who these composers are? OR are we only going = to AGO and OHS?=20    
(back) Subject: Re: "so much good renewal music" From: "Jonathan Orwig" <giwro@adelphia.net> Date: Fri, 14 Jan 2005 09:28:06 -0800   Now THERE I'll grant you a point...   As many of the churches from which this kind of music comes from do not really follow the Liturgical Year, you might find it hard to locate what Bob is asking for. <chuckle>   Since that's not an issue for me in my current situation (we only loosely follow the LY, and the pastor preaches on whatever he feels led for a given series, albeit he _does_ give me 6-10 weeks of topics and synopsis ahead of time) I've never given it much thought..   If I were doing contemporary music in a more structured situation (read: church/denomination that closely follows the church year), I fear I'd have to search long and hard and/or write it all myself.   Cheers,   Jonathan   Robert Lind wrote:   > I'd like to know the names of these composers who have written "so > much good renewal music." And while you're at it, perhaps you could > tell me specifically what they've written that one might use > during the season some of us are currently in. What have they written > for the Epiphany of our Lord, the flight into Egypt, the 12-year-old > Christ in the temple, the baptism of Christ, the marriage at Cana, > etc., etc.? And what do these folks have in store for us for Ash > Wednesday, Sundays of Lent, and Holy Week? Tell me about the number of > vocal parts and the instrumentation for these various pieces of music, > too, please. > > Thanks, > > Robert Lind (who this summer may go to his first regional AGO regional > convention since 1965--I hope that's not TOO excessive!) > > > ----- Original Message ----- > > *From:* T.Desiree' Hines <mailto:nicemusica@yahoo.com> > *To:* PipeChat <mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org> > *Sent:* Thursday, January 13, 2005 3:20 PM > *Subject:* Re: Richer Content In Praise Songs > > If I recall correctly...Ein Fieste Burg was Contemporary for > its time...a bar song I think. While all the wonderful forms > of traditional music have lasted, there is still so much good > renewal music out there, but are we going to the conferences > that have that music? Does anyone else on the list even know > who these composers are? OR are we only going to AGO and OHS? >     -- Jonathan Orwig Evensong Music, Media and Graphics New Choral and Organ Music http://www.evensongmusic.net    
(back) Subject: Re: Sorabji From: "Jonathan Orwig" <giwro@adelphia.net> Date: Fri, 14 Jan 2005 09:40:53 -0800   <chuckle>   Oh, Colin you _KNOW_ what I meant...   It was late, and my brain refused to accuratey compose the sentence   <chuckle again........>   Colin Mitchell wrote:   >Hello, > >Phew! > >That's a long concert Jonathan! > >Your stamina impresses me. > >Regards, > >Colin Mitchell UK > >--- Jonathan Orwig <giwro@adelphia.net> wrote: > > > > >>HOWever.... I _did_ find recently that some of his >>less formal piano >>pieces were enjoyable to me.... >>Bear in mind, that is 17 years later after hearing >>Sorabji for the first >>time. >> >> --   Jonathan Orwig Evensong Music, Media and Graphics New Choral and Organ Music http://www.evensongmusic.net    
(back) Subject: Re: Silliness: (Re: "Praise Songs" as heard ... ) From: "Margo Dillard" <dillardm@airmail.net> Date: Fri, 14 Jan 2005 12:39:31 -0600   I guess you have to be from the US Deep South to get that one.... "like manure - best when spread around"   Jan Nijhuis wrote: > Glenda's posts always make the gears in the head twirl... > > >>But since we are discussing praise music yet again, I >>will chime in with an opinion like everyone else, because opinions are >>like . . . > > > Like what? A retiring judge? > > .. Margo Dillard Organist, FUMC, Lewisville, TX Musical Feast Choral Society Dillard Piano & Organ Studio    
(back) Subject: Johannus Opus 1405 From: <robian@esc.net.au> Date: Sat, 15 Jan 2005 06:07:51 +1030   What's the Johannus 1405 like?   Comments in general?   What does it sound like?   What's it worth second hand?   I've been told that it's got a 32-note pedalboard, parallel and concave, but not radiating.   Robian.