PipeChat Digest #5113 - Monday, January 24, 2005
 
Organ study tour of the Netherlands and North Germany (cross posted; part
  by "Stephen Roberts" <sroberts01@snet.net>
Re: Endowed organs
  by <OrganMD@aol.com>
Re: Endowed organs
  by "Blaine Ricketts" <blainericketts@comcast.net>
Robert S. Baker, R.I.P.
  by "Stan Yoder" <vze2myh5@verizon.net>
Warren/ worship music
  by "Daniel Hancock" <dhancock@brpae.com>
Kids enthusiastic about the organ on TV
  by "Jarle Fagerheim" <jarle_fagerheim@yahoo.co.uk>
Temperature and reeds (was hybrid organs)
  by "Andy Lawrence" <andy@ablorgans.com>
RE: Kids enthusiastic about the organ on TV
  by "Will Light" <will.light@btinternet.com>
Re: Kids enthusiastic about the organ on TV
  by "N. Russotto" <ravenrockdesigns@gmail.com>
Re: Temperature and reeds (was hybrid organs)
  by "Jim McFarland" <mcfarland6@juno.com>
RE: Warren/ worship music
  by "John M. Scott" <jscott@wolfvillebaptist.ca>
PipeChat IRC this evening,
  by "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca>
Robert W. Jones
  by "atal" <atal@sympatico.ca>
 

(back) Subject: Organ study tour of the Netherlands and North Germany (cross posted; part one) From: "Stephen Roberts" <sroberts01@snet.net> Date: Mon, 24 Jan 2005 10:56:03 -0800 (PST)   Last week my WCSU organ students and I returned from a study tour of = organs in the Netherlands and North Germany. In a week we visited organs = in Alkmaar, Haarlem, Leiden, Amsterdam, Hamburg and Stade. This will be = an account of our visit in several installments. I trust that it may be = of interest to at least some of you. We arrived early in the morning at Schiphol airport in Amsterdam on = Tuesday, January 10. Unfortunately our plane had been late leaving New = York, and we arrived later than we had anticipated. Because of our = schedule, we had to skip the city tour that we had planned to take. Two = of my students, Juan Mesa and Gustavo Andres, who are from Chile and = Argentina respectively, had left a week earlier. They had visited = Gustavo's relatives in Stuttgart, and then proceeded on to Paris, where = they saw and heard a number of the organs in the "City of Light". On = Sunday Daniel Roth had invited them to the Tribune at St-Sulpice, where = they observed M. Roth play the 12 Noon Mass. Daniel very kindly allowed = Gustavo to play the organ for a few minutes after the Mass. Gustavo had = been unable to come along on our visit to Paris in 2003, so he had not had = the opportunity to play the five manual Cavaille-Coll organ, which is = surely one of the greatest in the world. Needless to say, Gustavo was thrilled at this opportunity. Juan and Gustavo arrived from Paris shortly after we checked into our = hotel, which was a charming little family run "pension" of only eight = rooms overlooking the Singel canal in the heart of old Amsterdam. The = house had been built by a sea captain in the 17th. century; in its present = state it has guest rooms named after various Dutch artists and features = prints by those artists in each room. This hotel, the Hotel Brouwer, was = a perfect choice as a "home base" for our visit, since it was full of = traditional Dutch charm, and it was conveniently located only about five = minutes walk from Amsterdam's Centraal Station. Juan and Gustavo had been underway for a week, so they had missed some = days of practice. They had been able to practice in Stuttgart, but not in = Paris. All of my students were to play for Pieter Van Dijk, the very fine = professor of organ at Amsterdam Conservatory, in two master classes in = Alkmaar on Thursday and Friday, and I wanted them to be at their very = best. Pieter had kindly put me in touch with David Boos, one of his organ = students at the Conservatory, who had arranged for us to practice there on = Tuesday afternoon, a few hours after we arrived. After a quick trip to = the supermarket to pick up some food, we all boarded the trolley to the = Conservatory, which is located just down the street from the = Concertgebouw. We met David in the entrance hall of the Conservatory. I had thought that = he was Dutch because of the double vowel in his name, but as it turns out, = he is an Austrian and a native "Wiener". Because I studied with the late = Anton Heiller in Vienna years ago, David and I had a lot to talk about. = David told me that he had come to Amsterdam to study with Pieter Van Dijk = because of the latter's excellent reputation as a teacher and performer, = and because Amsterdam is one of the two conservatories in Europe that make = extensive use of historic instruments for teaching and practice. For = those of you who may be interested: the other school that uses historic = instruments for teaching is Toulouse, according to David. David used his = conservatory pass to get us in to practice on a two manual mechanical = action organ by Verscheuren (spelling?). The organ is a well made little = instrument, though for my taste its rough-and-ready Dutch voicing makes it = a bit wearying in a small, dry practice room. The organ has a very fine action, and all of the students and I = made good use of it. We were very grateful to David for arranging for us = to practice; he and another of Pieter's students, Eri Takeguchi from = Japan, also used their cards again on Wednesday for us to get practice = time on three of the other practice organs there. On Wednesday we had the morning free. Some of my students went out = exploring; since my students are all male, I joked that they should enjoy = Amsterdam, but not do too much "window shopping"! Those of you who are = familiar with Amsterdam will understand exactly what I meant by that = admonition.... Others of us, myself included, went to the Rijksmuseum = to see some of their collection of 17th. century Dutch masters, including = Rembrandt's famous painting, "The Night Watch". At 12:30 we gathered at the Concertgebouw to attend one of their free = Wednesday concerts. We were very fortunate that the concert was an open = rehearsal of two movements of Symphony IV by Franz Schmidt. I know that = Schmidt's music isn't universally admired, but the portions of this = symphony that we heard were fine music. The Concertgebouw orchestra is = one of the world's great orchestras, and the bit we heard eloquently = demonstrated that they deserve their fine reputation. I was also = surprised to see what a young orchestra it was; most of the members of the = orchestra looked to be in their 20's, 30's, or 40's. There is also a very = handsome looking organ case in this splendid hall. Pieter Van Dijk later = told me that it is a romantic organ; I believe that the builder was Witte, = but I'm not sure about that. The hall is richly decorated, not as large = as the big concert halls in Vienna like the Konzerthaus and the Grosser = Musikvereinsaal, and is excellent acoustically. In the afternoon we traveled to Alkmaar by train, a trip which took about = 40 minutes. I noticed that our train passed through Zaandam on the way to = Alkmaar; I made a mental note that on our next study tour to the = Netherlands, we should try to visit the Flentrop shop, which is doing some = very fine work these days. Arriving in Alkmaar, we had to ask some local = residents for directions to the church of St. Laurens. Just a word about = our experiences with the Dutch people: we found everyone that we met there = very friendly, helpful, and unfailingly polite. Almost everyone there = that we encountered spoke excellent English, and they didn't seem cross at = all about having to answer in a foreign language. David Boos had told us = that a foreigner who spoke English would not have to learn Dutch at all, = since almost everyone there spoke English well. Whenever I visit a = country, I like to learn at least a few words of the local language, so = that I won't appear rude or presumptuous. We had all learned a bit of Dutch before we left, but except for "please" and "thank = you", we never had occasion to use any of what we had learned. The great church of St. Laurens is an immense Gothic church in the = historic heart of old Alkmaar, a city famous for its cheese making. The = town must have been very wealthy in the late Middle Ages, Renaissance, and = early Baroque periods, judging from the elegant buildings that date from = those times. St. Laurens had been built as a Catholic cathedral, but had = later been converted to a Dutch Reformed church. The church is now closed = and may be rented for various functions. The upkeep on the enormous = church building had proven to be too much for the dwindling congregation, = and some years ago the church donated the building to the town. Pieter = Van Dijk is therefore the organist of a closed church, a situation which = seemed very strange to us. He is in effect a civil servant, as were some = early Dutch organists like Jan Pieterszoon Sweelinck. As we entered the church, we were all awe-struck by the glorious sight of = the spectacular 17th century case, which is in classical style. Bright = daylight was streaming in the windows, and it shone on the case of the = organ with a glittering radiance. We had spent the last semester studying = the music and organs of this part of Europe, so the students immediately = recognized some of the elements of the form of the case as Dutch: double = storeyed towers, pipe flats with pipes joined at the feet, and the very = large Rugwerk (Rueckpositiv) case topped with a Dutch crown. Pieter's = organ class was already there, so we were able to hear the incomparable = sound of this great organ immediately. Pieter's class is international: = as I recall, he has only one Dutch student; the other students are from = the UK, Austria, Croatia, Finland, Japan, and Korea, and there may be = others that I have forgotten now. Pieter arrived soon afterward. He is a very pleasant and affable man, who = is very warm and friendly. After some formalities and introductions, we = sat down to hear his students play. They all played very well. As you = might expect, the literature that we heard was music of the late = Renaissance and Baroque; several works of J.S. Bach were played, as well = as music of Samuel Scheidt and other Northern European composers. One of = Pieter's students introduced himself as Chris Bragg, a young organist from = the UK with whom I had corresponded some years before. Chris used to post = on the various organ discussion lists, and that is how we had come in = contact. Chris is a talented and articulate young man with a keen = intellect. He played a very stylish performance of a work of Samuel = Scheidt, which in my opinion was some of the best playing that we heard on = that occasion. The students were all very enthusiastic and were all very devoted to their = teacher. The comments during the class were all very positive and helpful, = and that wasn't the slightest hint of pettiness or jealousy. Pieter's = comments made me realize that here is a very gifted teacher, who is = passionate about the music and the art of teaching. My students enjoyed = hearing the students in Pieter's class very much, and they also enjoyed = socializing with this talented group of young organists. We traveled back = to Amsterdam with some of his class, and they very kindly got my students = settled in at the Conservatory, where my students burned the midnight oil = to prepare for our classes the next day. (To be continued) Stephen Roberts Western Connecticut State University, Danbury, CT USA Next: Classes with Pieter Van Dijk, the organs in Alkmaar, trips to = Haarlem and Leiden, and a church service at the Oude Kerk in Amsterdam. =          
(back) Subject: Re: Endowed organs From: <OrganMD@aol.com> Date: Mon, 24 Jan 2005 13:56:51 EST   Hi .......... I am curious ........... An Aeolian-Skinner on slider chests? I thought that all but perhaps the very last instruments in the 70's were on pitman = chests. Bill  
(back) Subject: Re: Endowed organs From: "Blaine Ricketts" <blainericketts@comcast.net> Date: Mon, 24 Jan 2005 11:25:36 -0800   Where did the A-S organ come from that you just purchased and how large is it? This is exciting news for Reno where all you hear about is the Casavant by the River. BR   Ned Benson wrote:   > Our current organ is a dying Heinz 57, but there are 2 small > endowments of @ $10K each designated for the maintenance and > enhancement of the instrument. > > Together they have generated the $ necessary for tuning and repair, > though not enough to deal with the instrument's problems. Once we have > had rebuilt the =C6olian-Skinner we just purchased, the tuning will be > the only draw on the fund, which should then grow with the market so > that in 50-75 years when the slider chests need some work, the $ > should be there.      
(back) Subject: Robert S. Baker, R.I.P. From: "Stan Yoder" <vze2myh5@verizon.net> Date: Mon, 24 Jan 2005 14:33:04 -0500   Robert Baker died peacefully at 5:25 a.m. today, January 24, at his home = in Hamden, CT.   He had a massive heart attack last Wednesday, January 19th, which could = have signaled death, but instead he kept "inching away" daily, mostly pain-free with medications. = The Hospice nurse on duty last night (Sunday) suggested that he might enjoy hearing music, so his = Bose CD player was brought into his bedroom and they began to play the six CD's that the Yale = Institute of Sacred Music had produced last April of his organ recitals and choral programs. They played = them all through the night, and occasionally there was a flicker of a smile on his lips. The = final notes of the last CD sounded at 5:24 a.m. One minute later, Robert Stevens Baker passed into = Life Everlasting. What a triumphant and satisfying way to end a rich, productive life of service, = through music, to the church (and temple) and to a broad public and academic community!   At age 88 (July 7, 1916) he is survived by a son, James Stevens Baker = (wife Deborah) of Falls Church, VA, and a daughter Martha Faye Baker Russo (husband Joseph D.), = and two grandchildren, Joseph S. and Stephanie- all of Chandler, AZ. He was predeceased by his = wife of 61 years, Mary Francis Depler Baker, on July 23, 2004.   (The preceding is excerpted from an email written by his daughter Mary. No = firm funeral plans at that time.)   Stan Yoder Pittsburgh  
(back) Subject: Warren/ worship music From: "Daniel Hancock" <dhancock@brpae.com> Date: Mon, 24 Jan 2005 13:45:48 -0600   >It seems to me Mr. Warren managed to say nothing at all!   Why? I'm not disagreeing, on any terms, but why would you consider his opinions as written invalid? =20   Daniel  
(back) Subject: Kids enthusiastic about the organ on TV From: "Jarle Fagerheim" <jarle_fagerheim@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Mon, 24 Jan 2005 21:09:52 +0100   For the past few weeks my mother Bodil has been introducing classes from various elementary schools to the Jehmlich organ of her church, Tjensvoll in Stavanger, Norway. It's been extremely successful so far, and finally the local media picked it up today. A TV station covering southwest Norway made a wonderful little story about it, which is now available from http://www.tvvest.no. In the "web-tv" box click "siste sending". Then wait 13 minutes for the organ part, if you (like me) are unable to fast-forward it.   - Jarle http://jarle.moo.no  
(back) Subject: Temperature and reeds (was hybrid organs) From: "Andy Lawrence" <andy@ablorgans.com> Date: Mon, 24 Jan 2005 15:27:30 -0500   > It's as right to say the digital never goes > out of tune as to say reeds hold tune while the flues fluctuate with > minute temp. changes. What needs modification? Digital and reeds > as they don't move with the flues so they need the touching up.   > > Ron Severin   I've heard this before about reeds, and it is ridiculous. Temperature has = a huge effect on reed pipes, though it is a different effect than flues. Worse, unlike flue pipes, it can affect individual pipes in the same rank differently, which is why reeds often go out of tune with themselves, not just out of tune with the flues. I've even seen individual reed pipes go silent due to temperature, and come back when the temperature returned to normal.   I'm not sure where this misconception comes from.... my best guess is that =   people assume that the tuning is based on the wire alone perhaps? This is =   far from being true... the resonator length is a major part of the tuning equation for a reed pipe. I'm not picking on you Ron, this misconception seems to be widespread among reputable organ technicians. I suppose it doesn't really matter... either way, its the reeds that are gonna need tuning. Even if the organ had more reed pipes than flue pipes, it would still be the reeds that get tuned in a spot tuning... its because they go out of tune with themselves, as well as with the rest of the organ.   Andy     A.B.Lawrence Pipe Organ Service PO Box 111 Burlington, VT 05402 (802)578-3936 Visit our website at www.ablorgans.com  
(back) Subject: RE: Kids enthusiastic about the organ on TV From: "Will Light" <will.light@btinternet.com> Date: Mon, 24 Jan 2005 20:40:56 -0000   Very impressive Jarle! I could fast-forward it and your bit came over loud and clear!   Will Light Coventry UK   -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of Jarle Fagerheim Sent: 24 January 2005 20:10 To: PipeChat; PIPORG-L Subject: Kids enthusiastic about the organ on TV   For the past few weeks my mother Bodil has been introducing classes from various elementary schools to the Jehmlich organ of her church, Tjensvoll in Stavanger, Norway. It's been extremely successful so far, and finally the local media picked it up today. A TV station covering southwest Norway made a wonderful little story about it, which is now available from http://www.tvvest.no. In the "web-tv" box click "siste sending". Then wait 13 minutes for the organ part, if you (like me) are unable to fast-forward it.   - Jarle http://jarle.moo.no   ****************************************************************** "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org>    
(back) Subject: Re: Kids enthusiastic about the organ on TV From: "N. Russotto" <ravenrockdesigns@gmail.com> Date: Mon, 24 Jan 2005 15:48:13 -0500   Very nice. . . couldn't understan a word, but wonderful otherwise.   Cheers,   Nicholas F. Russotto     On Mon, 24 Jan 2005 20:40:56 -0000, Will Light <will.light@btinternet.com> wrote: > Very impressive Jarle! I could fast-forward it and your bit came over = loud > and clear! > > Will Light > Coventry UK > > -----Original Message----- > From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of > Jarle Fagerheim > Sent: 24 January 2005 20:10 > To: PipeChat; PIPORG-L > Subject: Kids enthusiastic about the organ on TV > > For the past few weeks my mother Bodil has been introducing classes from > various elementary schools to the Jehmlich organ of her church, > Tjensvoll in Stavanger, Norway. It's been extremely successful so far, > and finally the local media picked it up today. A TV station covering > southwest Norway made a wonderful little story about it, which is now > available from http://www.tvvest.no. In the "web-tv" box click "siste > sending". Then wait 13 minutes for the organ part, if you (like me) are > unable to fast-forward it. > > - Jarle > http://jarle.moo.no > > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> > > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> > >     -- Nicholas F. Russotto Somers, Connecticut  
(back) Subject: Re: Temperature and reeds (was hybrid organs) From: "Jim McFarland" <mcfarland6@juno.com> Date: Mon, 24 Jan 2005 16:18:22 -0500     On Mon, 24 Jan 2005 15:27:30 -0500 "Andy Lawrence" <andy@ablorgans.com> writes: reeds > > as they don't move with the flues so they need the touching up.   > > I've heard this before about reeds, and it is ridiculous.     Actually it is not ridiculous. Many reeds, properly built, stay in tune rather well. Some even "track" with the flues well enough to leave alone. This has been a constant over my entire 42 year tuning career.   Aeolian-Skinner reeds (in the pre-import years), E. M. Skinner reeds, Moller reeds from back in the days when they bought them from Gottfiried, Schantz reeds from the 40's and 50's, the list goes on.   We have several Aeolian-Skinner and Skinner organs where we rarely tune more than 1/2 dozen reed pipes on any given tuning occasion, and those have only slight celeste wavers. Out of the 175 organs that we tune a few times each year, a good 35 of them have very stable reeds. There are two Gottfried Orchestral Oboes, and one Schantz trumpet that we haven't touched in years. (They are not in air-conditioned churches either).   We maintain an Aeolian Skinner that suffered some unfortunate reed replacements and additions at the hand of a well meaning and reputable builder. The Aeolian Skinner reeds left, stay in tune, the rest do not.   One thing all of the reeds mentioned above have in common: they are meant to be tuned at the scroll (except when something is awry with the wire, the wedge, etc. - you know what I mean).The factory sent them out that way, the factory reps and qualified personal tuned them that way. If they have not been tuned in the interim that way, they must be retuned and re-trained. If the scrolls are damaged and/or have been rolled down too far at any point in the past, they must be repaired.   Another common thread is that they are voiced on four or more inches. Lower pressure reeds have tongues that are so thin as to guarantee instability. Even so, there is a Laukhuff trumpet on three inches that we have trained to stay in tune. We usually tune only 5 or six pipes in this rank. (The church DOES have AC.)   Many of these reeds were initially factory-tuned with the following procedure: Scrolls were opened to about twice their width. The pipes were tuned sharp on the wire until the sound just began to choke. After the wire was nudged back up a little, the finish tuning was done on the scroll. All future tuning is done on the scroll. If the temperature conditions are not normal in the chamber, they are not tuned at all, only when the chamber climate is appropriate.       > this misconception seems to be widespread among reputable organ technicians.   Apparently my misconception allows me to keep many of our organs in very nice tune year round.             Jim     PS: I am in Central Pennsylvania. Outside conditions swing from high 90's of temperature and humidity to the single digits. Every year.  
(back) Subject: RE: Warren/ worship music From: "John M. Scott" <jscott@wolfvillebaptist.ca> Date: Mon, 24 Jan 2005 17:54:33 -0400   I didn't mean to suggest that Mr. Warren's opinions are invalid. Quite the opposite really. I think what he has said is completely valid. The problem is that most of us (professional church musicians) know this already. The divide in congregations caused by styles of music has existed for many, = many years now. I think Mr. Warren has done a good job of riding the fence on this. The = only insight into his personal opinions come at the very end of the article = when he makes the connection between the psalm verse and contemporary music. I could just as easily make the connection between the psalm verse and a Mahler Symphony - although these are somewhat rarely scheduled as part of = a church service...   Mainly what I found lacking in the article was useful information upon = which to build, and against which to further my own thinking on the whole = subject.   JS   -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of Daniel Hancock Sent: Monday, January 24, 2005 3:46 PM To: pipechat@pipechat.org Subject: Warren/ worship music   >It seems to me Mr. Warren managed to say nothing at all!   Why? I'm not disagreeing, on any terms, but why would you consider his opinions as written invalid?   Daniel   ****************************************************************** "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org>    
(back) Subject: PipeChat IRC this evening, From: "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca> Date: Mon, 24 Jan 2005 17:33:30 -0500   All members of PipeChat are invited to join us in the PipeChat IRC any Friday and Monday evening - beginning at 9.00 PM Eastern Time.   To find out more about the Chat room, or how to get into it, go to PipeChat-L web page at http://www.pipechat.org/   You will find out all you need to know to join us.   Tonight at 9.00 PM, - I hope that we will see you there.   Cheers,   Bob Conway     ****************************************************************** "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org>        
(back) Subject: Robert W. Jones From: "atal" <atal@sympatico.ca> Date: Mon, 24 Jan 2005 19:48:39 -0500   A few years ago, a friend dumped numerous back issues of "The Organist's = Companion" (Leupold) in my lap, for which I have been grateful on = numerous occasions. One of the featured composers is Robert W. Jones (b. = 1932), and the brief bio mentions that he studied in Chicago (American = Conservatory of Music), and taught at Schoolcraft College, Detroit. Did = Jones compose other works for organ? I enjoy his style and wonder if = there is more of his material lurking somewhere. Thanks in advance for = any additional information.   Andreas Thiel St. Marys, Ontario