PipeChat Digest #5114 - Tuesday, January 25, 2005
 
Re: Robert W. Jones
  by "Robert Lind" <lindr@core.com>
Re: Robert W. Jones
  by "Richard Hazelip" <rhazelip1@yahoo.com>
Robert Baker's passing: some touching details
  by "Stephen Roberts" <sroberts01@snet.net>
Re: Robert Baker's passing: some touching details
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: Robert Baker's passing: some touching details
  by "Mura Kievman" <mkievman@nyc.rr.com>
Re: Temperature and reeds (was hybrid organs)
  by "Andy Lawrence" <andy@ablorgans.com>
DR. Robert Baker
  by "GB" <gblack@ocslink.com>
Aeolian-Skinner on slider chests
  by "Ned Benson" <nbenson@stjohnschurch.org>
Aeolian Skinner on slider chests
  by "Ned Benson" <nbenson@stjohnschurch.org>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Robert W. Jones From: "Robert Lind" <lindr@core.com> Date: Mon, 24 Jan 2005 19:35:26 -0600   John Henderson, in his Dictionary, lists Sonatas for Worship, Toccata on = "St. Denio," Postlude on "McKee," and Lullaby on "St. Clement."   I studied piano with a Robert Jones at American Conservatory, Chicago, = in the very early 1960s. He went on to study organ at Ann Arbor in the = fall of 1962. A couple of years ago, Robert Jones, organ professor at = the University of Houston, died. I was in touch with a few people at = that time who had studied with him (including one-time list member Bruce = Cornely), and I'm pretty sure that THIS Robert Jones is the one I knew = at American Conservatory.   The composer whose works I mentioned above was, according to Henderson, = born in 1932, was a teacher in Detroit and perhaps elsewhere in = Michigan, and "was largely self-taught in Michigan. Latterly an organist = in San Diego." I wrote to George in the Organ Stop music store in San = Diego in 2003, but IIRC, he couldn't tell me about this Robert Jones.   I'd like to more about these two Robert Joneses, but I assume the = composer you've written about is the one who went to San Diego.   Robert Lind ----- Original Message -----=20 From: atal=20 To: PipeChat=20 Sent: Monday, January 24, 2005 6:48 PM Subject: Robert W. Jones     A few years ago, a friend dumped numerous back issues of "The = Organist's Companion" (Leupold) in my lap, for which I have been = grateful on numerous occasions. One of the featured composers is Robert = W. Jones (b. 1932), and the brief bio mentions that he studied in = Chicago (American Conservatory of Music), and taught at Schoolcraft = College, Detroit. Did Jones compose other works for organ? I enjoy his = style and wonder if there is more of his material lurking somewhere. = Thanks in advance for any additional information.   Andreas Thiel St. Marys, Ontario  
(back) Subject: Re: Robert W. Jones From: "Richard Hazelip" <rhazelip1@yahoo.com> Date: Mon, 24 Jan 2005 18:05:24 -0800 (PST)   Greetings all: Robert John Jones received degrees from the American Conservatory in = Chicago, studied with Marilyn Mason and taught at University of Houston. = He is not the same person as Robert W. Jones. Richard Hazelip BM '95 and MM '98 under Robert Jones at UH   Robert Lind <lindr@core.com> wrote: John Henderson, in his Dictionary, lists Sonatas for Worship, Toccata on = "St. Denio," Postlude on "McKee," and Lullaby on "St. Clement." I studied piano with a Robert Jones at American Conservatory, Chicago, in = the very early 1960s. He went on to study organ at Ann Arbor in the fall = of 1962. A couple of years ago, Robert Jones, organ professor at the = University of Houston, died. I was in touch with a few people at that time = who had studied with him (including one-time list member Bruce Cornely), = and I'm pretty sure that THIS Robert Jones is the one I knew at American = Conservatory. The composer whose works I mentioned above was, according to Henderson, = born in 1932, was a teacher in Detroit and perhaps elsewhere in Michigan, = and "was largely self-taught in Michigan. Latterly an organist in San = Diego." I wrote to George in the Organ Stop music store in San Diego in = 2003, but IIRC, he couldn't tell me about this Robert Jones. I'd like to more about these two Robert Joneses, but I assume the composer = you've written about is the one who went to San Diego. Robert Lind ----- Original Message ----- From: atal To: PipeChat Sent: Monday, January 24, 2005 6:48 PM Subject: Robert W. Jones     A few years ago, a friend dumped numerous back issues of "The Organist's = Companion" (Leupold) in my lap, for which I have been grateful on numerous = occasions. One of the featured composers is Robert W. Jones (b. 1932), and = the brief bio mentions that he studied in Chicago (American Conservatory = of Music), and taught at Schoolcraft College, Detroit. Did Jones compose = other works for organ? I enjoy his style and wonder if there is more of = his material lurking somewhere. Thanks in advance for any additional = information.   Andreas Thiel St. Marys, Ontario   __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around http://mail.yahoo.com
(back) Subject: Robert Baker's passing: some touching details From: "Stephen Roberts" <sroberts01@snet.net> Date: Mon, 24 Jan 2005 18:47:49 -0800 (PST)   Dear List Friends: As you all now know, Robert Baker passed away this morning. It was my = great privilege to study with Dr. Baker at Yale, and over the years I had = come to appreciate his wisdom and counsel even more than I did as his = student. Alums of the School of Sacred Music at Union Seminary and early = alums of the Yale Institute of Sacred Music will remember Dr. Baker as the = guiding hand on the tiller of those distinguished institutions. They will = also remember his delightful and formidable administrative assistant, Mina = Belle Packer Wichmann. Mina Belle wrote these touching details of Dr. = Baker's passing: "He had a massive heart attack last Wednesday, January 19th., which could = have signaled death, but instead he kept "inching away" daily, mostly = pain-free with medications. The Hospice nurse on duty last night (Sunday) = suggested that he might enjoy hearing music, so his Bose CD player was = brought into his bedroom and they began to play the six CD's that the YISM = had produced last April of his organ recitals and choral programs. They = played them all through the night, and occasionally there was a flicker of = a smile on his lips. The final notes of the last CD ("The Joy of the = Redeemed" by Clarence Dickinson, who had been his organ teacher and mentor = at Union Seminary so many years ago) sounded at 5:24 a.m. One minute = later, Robert Stevens Baker passed into Life Everlasting. What a = triumphant and satisfying way to end a rich, productive life of service, = through music, to the church (and temple) and to a broad public and = academic community!" Indeed: a very fitting and appropriate end to the long and very productive = life of a great musician and a great human being. Would that God grant us = all such a peaceful death. One of Dr. Baker's pupils, my old friend Ron Ebrecht, organist of Wesleyan = University, had sent an email to some of Dr. Baker's friends and pupils in = the area about a month and a half ago. Ron suggested to all of us that we = go to see Dr. Baker, since at that time he was failing rather quickly. I = visited Dr. Baker at his home in Hamden, CT, in mid December, and found = him his old cheerful, wise, witty, and fun loving self. We had a = wonderful long chat, and I told him how much I had learned from him over = the years, and how much influence he had had on me and on so many others = in our profession who are far more distinguished than I. He seemed to = appreciate what I said very much, but with his typical modesty, he said = that he had simply done his best. In retrospect I'm so grateful to Ron = for encouraging me to go to visit Dr. Baker, and I'm very glad now that I = heeded Ron's message. Goodbye, dear teacher! We shall not see your like again soon. = Requiescat in pace. Stephen Roberts Western CT State University, Danbury, CT USA  
(back) Subject: Re: Robert Baker's passing: some touching details From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Mon, 24 Jan 2005 22:14:59 +0000   On 1/25/05 2:47 AM, "Stephen Roberts" <sroberts01@snet.net> wrote:   > Goodbye, dear teacher! We shall not see your like again soon. = Requiescat in > pace.   Stephen Roberts: No words can add. Thank you very much.   Alan Freed  
(back) Subject: Re: Robert Baker's passing: some touching details From: "Mura Kievman" <mkievman@nyc.rr.com> Date: Mon, 24 Jan 2005 22:30:13 -0500   I sang with Robert Baker at St. James Church for three years in the early 70s and again for his last year at First Presbyterian around 1987, both in =   Manhattan. He was a thrilling organist and choir master to work with and = I will miss him sorely.   I feel blessed to have known him.   Mura Kievman      
(back) Subject: Re: Temperature and reeds (was hybrid organs) From: "Andy Lawrence" <andy@ablorgans.com> Date: Mon, 24 Jan 2005 22:31:49 -0500   Thanks for this informative post. I'm not sure why it has a corrective = tone though, because you have confirmed everything I said, and added much to = it. That reeds are indeed affected by temperature (as opposed to the misconception that they are not), with the very interesting and = informative addition that certain reeds can be very consistent and can be affected by temperature very similary to the flues, making tuning easy and infrequent. = It sounds as though reeds that accomplish this are both of a certain type and very carefully built and voiced. I have encountered such reeds as = well, though I am less knowledgeable about just what makes them so stable. Andy   On Mon, 24 Jan 2005 16:18:22 -0500, Jim McFarland wrote > On Mon, 24 Jan 2005 15:27:30 -0500 "Andy Lawrence" <andy@ablorgans.com> > writes: > reeds > > > as they don't move with the flues so they need the touching up. > > > > > I've heard this before about reeds, and it is ridiculous. > > Actually it is not ridiculous. Many reeds, properly built, stay in tune > rather well. Some even "track" with the flues well enough to leave > alone. This has been a constant over my entire 42 year tuning career. > > Aeolian-Skinner reeds (in the pre-import years), E. M. Skinner reeds, > Moller reeds from back in the days when they bought them from > Gottfiried, Schantz reeds from the 40's and 50's, the list goes on. > > We have several Aeolian-Skinner and Skinner organs where we rarely tune > more than 1/2 dozen reed pipes on any given tuning occasion, and > those have only slight celeste wavers. Out of the 175 organs that > we tune a few times each year, a good 35 of them have very stable > reeds. There are two Gottfried Orchestral Oboes, and one Schantz > trumpet that we haven't touched in years. (They are not in air- > conditioned churches either). > > We maintain an Aeolian Skinner that suffered some unfortunate reed > replacements and additions at the hand of a well meaning and > reputable builder. The Aeolian Skinner reeds left, stay in tune, > the rest do not. > > One thing all of the reeds mentioned above have in common: they are > meant to be tuned at the scroll (except when something is awry with the > wire, the wedge, etc. - you know what I mean).The factory sent them out > that way, the factory reps and qualified personal tuned them that > way. If they have not been tuned in the interim that way, they must > be retuned and re-trained. If the scrolls are damaged and/or have > been rolled down too far at any point in the past, they must be = repaired. > > Another common thread is that they are voiced on four or more > inches. Lower pressure reeds have tongues that are so thin as to = guarantee > instability. Even so, there is a Laukhuff trumpet on three inches that > we have trained to stay in tune. We usually tune only 5 or six > pipes in this rank. (The church DOES have AC.) > > Many of these reeds were initially factory-tuned with the following > procedure: Scrolls were opened to about twice their width. The pipes > were tuned sharp on the wire until the sound just began to choke. After > the wire was nudged back up a little, the finish tuning was done on the > scroll. All future tuning is done on the scroll. If the temperature > conditions are not normal in the chamber, they are not tuned at all, > only when the chamber climate is appropriate. > > > this misconception seems to be widespread among reputable organ > technicians. > > Apparently my misconception allows me to keep many of our organs in very > nice tune year round. > > Jim > > PS: I am in Central Pennsylvania. Outside conditions swing from > high 90's of temperature and humidity to the single digits. Every year. > > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related > topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org>       A.B.Lawrence Pipe Organ Service PO Box 111 Burlington, VT 05402 (802)578-3936 Visit our website at www.ablorgans.com  
(back) Subject: DR. Robert Baker From: "GB" <gblack@ocslink.com> Date: Mon, 24 Jan 2005 22:43:10 -0600   I am sadden to hear the passing of a great organist and wonderful person. Dr. Baker was born in Pontiac, Illinois,( my home town) and was a English student of my great Aunt Ada's at the local high school. She told me a story about him that I will never forget. His father was the judge for Livingston County and wanted him to become a lawyer; others wanted him to = be a physician and he was leaning toward majoring in organ at IWU at Bloomington, IL. My great aunt told him that he should listen to his inner-self and let that be his guide. The organ world is better off for = that decision. He was the consultant on the new Moller organ ( 1960) at the Methodist Church where I grew up and took lessons on that during the mid 60's. He also played the dedicatory recital of one of Hilgreen- Lane Company's last efforts to keep the firm open. It was installed at First Lutheran in Pontiac in 1969. I attend that recital along with my Great Aunt and he = was very gracious to us both. He thanked Aunt Ada for all that she had done = for him. I was studying organ at ISU in Normal at the time and got to sit = right behind him during the recital. He told me to have no wasted motion and = his feet just flew over the pedals. I was amazed at that and he told me that = it was just as easy as playing "Peter, Peter Pumpkin Eater." He has gone to = a better place now; may God rest his Soul. Gary Black    
(back) Subject: Aeolian-Skinner on slider chests From: "Ned Benson" <nbenson@stjohnschurch.org> Date: Mon, 24 Jan 2005 18:57:27 -0800   Bill,   The slider chests are George S. Hutchings, 1896, opus 384; Aeolian-Skinner tonally redid the instrument as =C6olian-Skinner, 1954, opus 1066A. It was in Christ Church, New Haven, until a week ago.   The swell chest is humongous - the "Mother of All Slider Chests." If you want I'll send a picture of it being remove from Christ Church. =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D   Subject: Re: Endowed organs From: <OrganMD@aol.com> Date: Mon, 24 Jan 2005 13:56:51 EST   Hi ..........   I am curious ........... An Aeolian-Skinner on slider chests? I thought that all but perhaps the very last instruments in the 70's were on pitman chests.   Bill   Dr. Ned H. Benson St. John's Presbyterian Church 1070 West Plumb Lane Reno, Nevada 89509 http://www.stjohnschurch.org    
(back) Subject: Aeolian Skinner on slider chests From: "Ned Benson" <nbenson@stjohnschurch.org> Date: Mon, 24 Jan 2005 19:04:01 -0800   Blaine,   As I wrote to Bill, we purchased the George S. Hutchings, 1896, opus 384 /=C6olian-Skinner, 1954, opus 1066A from Christ Church, New Haven. It was pulled a week ago and now awaits rebuilding in Missouri. The instrument was 45 ranks; Christ Church kept 4 for their new LIvely-Fulcher. We've been given vintage A/S ranks to replace those. We'll likely add 2-3 ranks (8' Diapason in Great and Swell, Terz in Swell), plus vintage Deagan chimes.   The Casavant in Trinity Episcopal is nice - certainly the best instrument in Northern Nevada, as well as the largest. But it is unfortunately placed, speaking across the Chancel rather than straight into the Nave, so seems to me to lack a certain sense of presence I look for from an instrument of 39 ranks. Actually, I think it's 32 ranks in the Chancel, 7 on an antiphonal. =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D Subject: Re: Endowed organs From: "Blaine Ricketts" <blainericketts@comcast.net> Date: Mon, 24 Jan 2005 11:25:36 -0800   Where did the A-S organ come from that you just purchased and how large is it? This is exciting news for Reno where all you hear about is the Casavant by the River. BR   -- Dr. Ned H. Benson St. John's Presbyterian Church 1070 West Plumb Lane Reno, Nevada 89509 http://www.stjohnschurch.org