PipeChat Digest #5115 - Tuesday, January 25, 2005
 
Young kids on the organ
  by "Andy Lawrence" <andy@ablorgans.com>
Casavant "hanging plant"
  by "Andy Lawrence" <andy@ablorgans.com>
Do you know anything about Johnson organs from the nineteenth century Uni
  by "Jerry Richer" <jerry@ChirpingBat.Com>
Re: Casavant "hanging plant"
  by "Hugh Drogemuller" <hdrogemuller@sympatico.ca>
Re: Casavant "hanging plant"
  by "Lin Yangchen" <yangchen@raffles.org>
Re: Do you know anything about Johnson organs from the nineteenth century
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net>
Re: Casavant "hanging plant"
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: Question re hybrid organs
  by "Russ Greene" <rggreene2@shaw.ca>
Question re hybrid organs
  by "F. Richard Burt" <effarbee@verizon.net>
Re: Question re hybrid organs
  by "Travis L. Evans" <tlevans95@charter.net>
What's the Cathedral that's closing in New York City?
  by "Jerry Richer" <jerry@ChirpingBat.Com>
Re: What's the Cathedral that's closing in New York City?
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
Re: Re: Do you know anything about Johnson organs from the nineteenth cen
  by "Hell-Concerts@t-online.de" <Hell-Concerts@t-online.de>
Re: Question re hybrid organs
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
 

(back) Subject: Young kids on the organ From: "Andy Lawrence" <andy@ablorgans.com> Date: Tue, 25 Jan 2005 05:57:12 -0500   Bravo to Leslie Wolf Robb in page 95 of the February TAO. I have long thought that young kids should not be told they have to wait years and = years before starting at the organ. No wonder most lose interest. I hope more will do this.   While we're at it, lets have more kids help with registration, page turns, =   etc.   Andy   A.B.Lawrence Pipe Organ Service PO Box 111 Burlington, VT 05402 (802)578-3936 Visit our website at www.ablorgans.com  
(back) Subject: Casavant "hanging plant" From: "Andy Lawrence" <andy@ablorgans.com> Date: Tue, 25 Jan 2005 07:09:27 -0500   I'm really intrigued by the picture in the back cover of the Feb TAO, the Casavant ad, an organ that looks like a big hanging plant in the middle of =   the room. Anyone know where it is, and whether its extant? (I assume it is... I wouldn't think they'd want to put a discarded organ in their ad) Andy     A.B.Lawrence Pipe Organ Service PO Box 111 Burlington, VT 05402 (802)578-3936 Visit our website at www.ablorgans.com  
(back) Subject: Do you know anything about Johnson organs from the nineteenth century United States ? From: "Jerry Richer" <jerry@ChirpingBat.Com> Date: Tue, 25 Jan 2005 07:37:39 -0500   There was a Johnson organ installed at the New York State School for the Blind at Batavia New York in 1868 or so. Do you know anything about this company? Where it was located? How influential it was in organ building? Could it have anything to do with the Johnson in Fargo North Dakota?   Jerry   Chirp|Chirp|Chirp: It's the Bat, Chirping Bat .Com, www.chirpingbat.com    
(back) Subject: Re: Casavant "hanging plant" From: "Hugh Drogemuller" <hdrogemuller@sympatico.ca> Date: Tue, 25 Jan 2005 08:34:08 -0500   I believe it stands in the Lewis & Clark College , Portland Ore.   HD At 07:09 AM 25-01-05 -0500, you wrote: >I'm really intrigued by the picture in the back cover of the Feb TAO, the >Casavant ad, an organ that looks like a big hanging plant in the middle = of >the room. Anyone know where it is, and whether its extant? (I assume it >is... I wouldn't think they'd want to put a discarded organ in their ad) >Andy > > >A.B.Lawrence Pipe Organ Service >PO Box 111 >Burlington, VT 05402 >(802)578-3936 >Visit our website at www.ablorgans.com > >****************************************************************** >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> >List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> >List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org>    
(back) Subject: Re: Casavant "hanging plant" From: "Lin Yangchen" <yangchen@raffles.org> Date: Tue, 25 Jan 2005 05:56:42 -0800 (PST)   http://infopuq.uquebec.ca/~uss1010/orgues/etatsunis/portlandlcc.html   Yangchen   --- Hugh Drogemuller <hdrogemuller@sympatico.ca> wrote:   From: Hugh Drogemuller <hdrogemuller@sympatico.ca> Date: Tue, 25 Jan 2005 08:34:08 -0500 To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Subject: Re: Casavant "hanging plant" I believe it stands in the Lewis & Clark College , Portland Ore. HD At 07:09 AM 25-01-05 -0500, you wrote:   I'm really intrigued by the picture in the back cover of the Feb TAO, the Casavant ad, an organ that looks like a big hanging plant in the middle of the room. Anyone know where it is, and whether its extant? (I assume it is... I wouldn't think they'd want to put a discarded organ in their ad) Andy A.B.Lawrence Pipe Organ Service PO Box 111 Burlington, VT 05402 (802)578-3936 Visit our website at www.ablorgans.com ************************************************************ ****** "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org List-Subscribe: < mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> List-Digest: < mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> List-Unsubscribe: < mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org>  
(back) Subject: Re: Do you know anything about Johnson organs from the nineteenth century United States ? From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net> Date: Tue, 25 Jan 2005 08:19:48 -0600   William A. Johnson (1816-1901) originally worked as a building contractor = in Westfield, Massachusetts, but got into organbuilding around 1844 -- initially as something to do in the winters, but soon full time -- after helping E. & G.G. Hook to install a new organ in the Methodist Church he belonged to. Later his son, William H. Johnson (1841-1922) joined the business and it became Johnson & Son. The firm closed in 1898 after = making, as I recall, around 680 organs. Old Mr. Johnson then retired and his son became a stockbroker. Their pipemaker Edwin Hedges set up his own pipemaking business. With Hook & Hastings and the Roosevelts Johnson & = Son were one of the top firms of organbuilders in the country for quality. Their instruments had a finish and refinement that was highly prized.   John Speller   ----- Original Message ----- From: "Jerry Richer" <jerry@ChirpingBat.Com> To: "Pipe Chat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Tuesday, January 25, 2005 6:37 AM Subject: Do you know anything about Johnson organs from the nineteenth century United States ?     > There was a Johnson organ installed at the New York State School = for > the Blind at Batavia New York in 1868 or so. Do you know anything about > this company? Where it was located? How influential it was in organ > building? Could it have anything to do with the Johnson in Fargo North > Dakota?        
(back) Subject: Re: Casavant "hanging plant" From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Tue, 25 Jan 2005 10:03:11 +0000   On 1/25/05 12:09 PM, "Andy Lawrence" <andy@ablorgans.com> wrote:   > an organ that looks like a big hanging plant in the middle of > the room. Anyone know where it is, and whether its extant?   Sounds like one I've heard of (but have not seen) in Portland, Oregon. Perhaps at Lewis & Clark College/University?   Alan    
(back) Subject: Re: Question re hybrid organs From: "Russ Greene" <rggreene2@shaw.ca> Date: Tue, 25 Jan 2005 10:27:31 -0600   The hybrid installations which I am most familiar with have minimal problems with tuning - sensors adjust the digital voices and that's pretty much that.   However, several of them have nasty problems with acoustics, particularly in "dead" buildings. The digital side often has enhanced acoustics, adding reverb, etc. to simulate a more live environment; equivalent enhancement is seldom practical on the pipe side, so the pipe voices and digital voices sound like they are in different buildings.   In one of our local installations, actually the home church of our only Rodgers dealer, the digital voices sound rich and full and the pipes (principal chorus only, I think) sound like a loud accordian.   How can this problem be addressed?   TTFN, Russ Greene     On Jan 23, 2005, at 8:26 PM, Glenda wrote:   > I am curious about something. On these hybrid organs (i.e., with some > pipes and some electronic stops), are there any chronic problems with > keeping the two different genres in tune with each other? I am > particularly interested in situations where the building isn't > constantly kept within a certain range of temperature (i.e., the > heat/AC > is kept off when church services aren't being held).    
(back) Subject: Question re hybrid organs From: "F. Richard Burt" <effarbee@verizon.net> Date: Tue, 25 Jan 2005 10:30:12 -0600   Good Morning, Glenda:   Let me take the challenge to answer this question.   > I am curious about something. On these hybrid organs > (i.e., with some pipes and some electronic stops), are > there any chronic problems with keeping the two > different genres in tune with each other?   That depends on several variables.   In my church, we try to save on the expense of running heating and cooling, and if the organ temperature shifts about 4 degrees F from where I tuned the pipes, the digital stops should be tuned to the pipes, again, for now I can hear small "wiggles" begin to set up in the ensemble.   So, I set up this procedure for our organist.   1. When you arrive to practice (any day), turn on the Great Octave 4 and the Choir Principal 4. Play both stops at tenor C (second C from the bottom of the keyboard) and turn the tuning know until the "wiggles" straighten out. One organist learned to do this well, the other never caught on to tuning the two sets of sounds together.   2. When you leave the bench on Sunday morning, before you go to the Choir Room to rehearse with the singers, tune the digital stops again. This give some assurance that the organ will be in tune, as well as can be expected, when returning for the service prelude.   This seems to be a very simplistic situation in my mind, and I opften put in a 10-turn potentiometer to control the pitch of the digital stops. This "fine-tune pot" will allow a discerning organist to set the digital stops dead on with the wind blown flue pipes.   My difficulty with one organist was that, after I demonstrated the tuning process for her, "But it's not in tune with the piano." Or, "The reeds are not in tune now." The truth is that we are not tuning the digital stops to the piano or the reeds. Those two entities are independent of the tuning of the flues, which easily rise and fall with the changes in temperature.   AND, our building superentendant is not at all interested in how well the organ is in tune. He keeps the temperature adjusted as the Finance Committee tell him, to conserve the heating and cooling expense. Our heating expense is only for about six weeks in the mid-winter, but we have cooling expense the rest of the year in Texas. Also, I have considerable resistance from the Building Administrator when I come to tune the organ. He does not understand that the cooling adjustment is not for my benefit, but to stabilize the organ at a temperature as close to the temperature that will be in effect on Sunday. So, I do the best I can.   There is another quirk. Some E-org products have a sensor on one of the pipes that sends an electrical signal proportionate to the temperature of the pipe. My experience with this gadget is that it keeps up with the temperature of the pipe, but does not measure the temperature of the air being blown into them. This is of little comfort, for as soon as the heating/cooling system reaches the optimum temperature for which it was set, it will cycle ON or OFF and the whole organ begins to shift in pitch the other way.   The gadget keeps the pitch close, but it is still not as good as tuning the digital stops to the flue pipes by ear.   The question for the organist is: how much do you want to maintain "fine tune" control from beginning to end of the service? Most organists I have known consider the variableness of the temperature effects on tuning as an asset to keep the organ more interesting to listen to.   As with an orchestra or band, you might always stop between musical pieces and "tune" back to proper pitch.   I have another organ in a church that maintains a very close control over the air in their auditorium. This pipe organ is rarely off very much with the digital stops. Tune it at the beginning of the service, and it is playable in tune for the rest of the day.   Let me know if you need more information.   Appreciatively, F. Richard Burt     ..      
(back) Subject: Re: Question re hybrid organs From: "Travis L. Evans" <tlevans95@charter.net> Date: Tue, 25 Jan 2005 10:59:18 -0600   If anyone is interested in hearing the Pipe/Digital Combo at our church = you can go to;   http://webpages.charter.net/tlevans95/page5.html   and Click on the MP3 Recording link in the middle of the page.   Travis ----- Original Message ----- From: "F. Richard Burt" <effarbee@verizon.net> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Tuesday, January 25, 2005 10:30 AM Subject: Question re hybrid organs     > Good Morning, Glenda: > > Let me take the challenge to answer this question. > > > I am curious about something. On these hybrid organs > > (i.e., with some pipes and some electronic stops), are > > there any chronic problems with keeping the two > > different genres in tune with each other? > > That depends on several variables. > > In my church, we try to save on the expense of running > heating and cooling, and if the organ temperature shifts > about 4 degrees F from where I tuned the pipes, the > digital stops should be tuned to the pipes, again, for > now I can hear small "wiggles" begin to set up in the > ensemble. > > So, I set up this procedure for our organist. > > 1. When you arrive to practice (any day), turn on the > Great Octave 4 and the Choir Principal 4. Play > both stops at tenor C (second C from the bottom > of the keyboard) and turn the tuning know until the > "wiggles" straighten out. One organist learned to do > this well, the other never caught on to tuning the two > sets of sounds together. > > 2. When you leave the bench on Sunday morning, before > you go to the Choir Room to rehearse with the singers, > tune the digital stops again. This give some assurance > that the organ will be in tune, as well as can be expected, > when returning for the service prelude. > > This seems to be a very simplistic situation in my mind, > and I opften put in a 10-turn potentiometer to control the > pitch of the digital stops. This "fine-tune pot" will allow > a discerning organist to set the digital stops dead on with > the wind blown flue pipes. > > My difficulty with one organist was that, after I demonstrated > the tuning process for her, "But it's not in tune with the piano." > Or, "The reeds are not in tune now." The truth is that we are > not tuning the digital stops to the piano or the reeds. Those > two entities are independent of the tuning of the flues, which > easily rise and fall with the changes in temperature. > > AND, our building superentendant is not at all interested in > how well the organ is in tune. He keeps the temperature > adjusted as the Finance Committee tell him, to conserve > the heating and cooling expense. Our heating expense is > only for about six weeks in the mid-winter, but we have > cooling expense the rest of the year in Texas. Also, I have > considerable resistance from the Building Administrator > when I come to tune the organ. He does not understand > that the cooling adjustment is not for my benefit, but > to stabilize the organ at a temperature as close to the > temperature that will be in effect on Sunday. So, I do > the best I can. > > There is another quirk. Some E-org products have a sensor > on one of the pipes that sends an electrical signal proportionate > to the temperature of the pipe. My experience with this > gadget is that it keeps up with the temperature of the pipe, > but does not measure the temperature of the air being blown > into them. This is of little comfort, for as soon as the > heating/cooling system reaches the optimum temperature > for which it was set, it will cycle ON or OFF and the whole > organ begins to shift in pitch the other way. > > The gadget keeps the pitch close, but it is still > not as good as tuning the digital stops to the flue pipes > by ear. > > The question for the organist is: how much do you want > to maintain "fine tune" control from beginning to end of > the service? Most organists I have known consider the > variableness of the temperature effects on tuning as an > asset to keep the organ more interesting to listen to. > > As with an orchestra or band, you might always stop > between musical pieces and "tune" back to proper pitch. > > I have another organ in a church that maintains a very > close control over the air in their auditorium. This pipe > organ is rarely off very much with the digital stops. Tune > it at the beginning of the service, and it is playable in tune > for the rest of the day. > > Let me know if you need more information. > > Appreciatively, > F. Richard Burt > > > . > > > > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> > >      
(back) Subject: What's the Cathedral that's closing in New York City? From: "Jerry Richer" <jerry@ChirpingBat.Com> Date: Tue, 25 Jan 2005 12:09:51 -0500   What's the Cathedral that's closing in New York City? It's going to = be leveled to make room for another building and the organ needs a new home? Where is it in New York City? It was discussed on this or the PIPORG-L = list recently.   Jerry   Chirp|Chirp|Chirp: It's the Bat, Chirping Bat .Com, www.chirpingbat.com    
(back) Subject: Re: What's the Cathedral that's closing in New York City? From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Tue, 25 Jan 2005 12:13:08 EST   It's Called St. Ann's Cathedral. A beautiful place, a shame it's being slated for tearing down.   Ron    
(back) Subject: Re: Re: Do you know anything about Johnson organs from the nineteenth century United States ? From: "Hell-Concerts@t-online.de" <Hell-Concerts@t-online.de> Date: Tue, 25 Jan 2005 18:24:45 +0100   As to my best knowledge the oldest extant Johnson & Son organ, completely refurbished, is located at the Provincial House of the School Sisters of Notre Dame in Mankato, MN. Felix Hell had the privilege to perform a recital on that wonderful instrument in October 2000.   Hans-Friedrich Hell     -----Original Message----- Date: Tue, 25 Jan 2005 15:19:48 +0100 Subject: Re: Do you know anything about Johnson organs from the nineteenth century United States ? From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org>   William A. Johnson (1816-1901) originally worked as a building contractor in Westfield, Massachusetts, but got into organbuilding around 1844 -- initially as something to do in the winters, but soon full time -- after helping E. & G.G. Hook to install a new organ in the Methodist Church he belonged to. Later his son, William H. Johnson (1841-1922) joined the business and it became Johnson & Son. The firm closed in 1898 after making, as I recall, around 680 organs. Old Mr. Johnson then retired and his son became a stockbroker. Their pipemaker Edwin Hedges set up his own pipemaking business. With Hook & Hastings and the Roosevelts Johnson & Son were one of the top firms of organbuilders in the country for quality. Their instruments had a finish and refinement that was highly prized.   John Speller   ----- Original Message ----- From: "Jerry Richer" <jerry@ChirpingBat.Com> To: "Pipe Chat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Tuesday, January 25, 2005 6:37 AM Subject: Do you know anything about Johnson organs from the nineteenth century United States ?     > There was a Johnson organ installed at the New York State School for > the Blind at Batavia New York in 1868 or so. Do you know anything about > this company? Where it was located? How influential it was in organ > building? Could it have anything to do with the Johnson in Fargo North > Dakota?         ****************************************************************** "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org>        
(back) Subject: Re: Question re hybrid organs From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Tue, 25 Jan 2005 13:28:11 +0000   On 1/25/05 4:59 PM, "Travis L. Evans" <tlevans95@charter.net> wrote:   > If anyone is interested in hearing the Pipe/Digital Combo at our church = you > can go to; > > http://webpages.charter.net/tlevans95/page5.html > > and Click on the MP3 Recording link in the middle of the page. > Good grief, Travis! That is FABULOUS! By the end, my face was all = contorted out of shape, and I was about to BAWL!   Encore!   Alan Freed