PipeChat Digest #5118 - Wednesday, January 26, 2005
 
RE: suggestions for antiphonal ranks?
  by "alantaylor1" <alantaylor1@members.v21.co.uk>
Re: suggestions for antiphonal ranks?
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
RE: suggestions for antiphonal ranks?
  by "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
Organ Crawl in Gainesville, Florida
  by "Will Scarboro" <whs1325@yahoo.com>
Re: Question re hybrid organs
  by "Bob Elms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au>
Re: "authentic worship"
  by "Charles Peery" <cepeery@earthlink.net>
Re: "authentic worship"
  by "Octaaf" <octaaf@charter.net>
Re: "authentic worship"
  by "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
Re: "authentic worship"
  by "Charles Peery" <cepeery@earthlink.net>
RE: Question re hybrid organs
  by "Will Light" <will.light@btinternet.com>
RE: Question re hybrid organs
  by "Will Light" <will.light@btinternet.com>
 

(back) Subject: RE: suggestions for antiphonal ranks? From: "alantaylor1" <alantaylor1@members.v21.co.uk> Date: Wed, 26 Jan 2005 10:04:20 -0000   It seems you have forgotten the specification of Southwark Cathedral, = Ross. Where the great chorus is built on a Tibia rank. This, as you know, = extends from 16ft to a Tibia mixture. Hope Jones got most of his ideas from TCL.   TCL wanted to join forces with H-J on working at Worcester. TCL wanted to install a Tuba on 100inches wind pressure. But, H-J didn't like the idea. Especially as the Tuba would have been affected by the tremulant. As you will know, TCL tremulants always work on the whole organ.   The joy of Southwark Cathedral, listening to the full organ, dominated by the Tibia chorus and the high pressure (50inches) reeds. All of this with the tremulant shaking the building.   Alan   >TC Lewis would have added a 16ft Tibia with an 8ft and 4ft extension plus tremulant, Ross. (g)   What? Extensions on a manual division? Not possible on the sort of slider chest Lewis used, and I've never heard of him ever having any manual extensions, anyway. If I'm wrong, please give me examples of where this has happened. I = wouldn't have thought he would have had a Tibia either. Lieblich Gedackt, yes, = often, but a TIBIA?   Please enlighten me.......   Ross     -- No virus found in this outgoing message. Checked by AVG Anti-Virus. Version: 7.0.300 / Virus Database: 265.7.4 - Release Date: 25/01/2005    
(back) Subject: Re: suggestions for antiphonal ranks? From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Wed, 26 Jan 2005 05:05:46 EST   Here's what I would suggest for an eight to ten stop antiphonal in a big reverberant church.   Contre Violone 16' 61 p Sm Diapason 8' 61 p Sm Flute Harmonique 8' 61 p W&M Violone 8' 12 p ext. Bourdon 8' 61 p HL Octave 4' 61 p Sm Flute Octaviante 4' 61 p 80% Tin Violetta 4' 12 p ext. Quint 2 2/3' 61 p HL Super Octave 2' 61 p Sm Fourniture IV 2' 244 p Sm Tromba 16' 61 p W&M Tromba 8' 12 p ext. Trumpet 8' 61 p Sm Clarion 4' 12 p ext   Here you have opportunities to move in French, English, and German directions with an extended big string, Colorful Flutes, A useful lower pitched Mixture and a smooth build up during the singing. The Violone being a broad scale. The Diapason Bold but not overly loud 40 SC, Ocatve 4' two Sc smaller than the 8' 2 2/3' Quint slightly tapered 2 Sc smaller than the Octave, and the Super Octave Cylindrical and 1 sc smaller than the Quint. Fourniture IV 1- 18 (15, 19, 22, 26) 19-25 (12, 15, 19, 22) 26-37 (8ve, 12, 15, 19) 38-49 (8ve 8ve, 12, 15 50-61 (1st, 8ve 12, 15)   With this setup you can go from a whisper to a cathedral roar without being over the top. You'll use the Violoetta 4' much more than you probably can guess because of all the color opportunities and = combinations possible. The mixture is there to reinforce not obliterate with high = pitches. You don't want a screamer. The Tromba will be more of a Tuba in the open and much more useful than an en Chamade. The Trumpet more German in intonation. It will make for a fun organ to play. I wouldn't go higher than 4" of wind, and I would recommend nicking for smoothness.   Ron Severin Sm=3D Spotted Metal HL=3D Hammered Lead Tin=3D 80% thicker walls, 20% Lead W&M=3D Wood and metal  
(back) Subject: RE: suggestions for antiphonal ranks? From: "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Thu, 27 Jan 2005 00:26:48 +1300   >It seems you have forgotten the specification of Southwark Cathedral, = Ross. Where the great chorus is built on a Tibia rank. This, as you know, = extends from 16ft to a Tibia mixture. Hope Jones got most of his ideas from TCL.   OK. I'll admit to being taken in by your joke. I deserve to be laughed at here, but at least I've been polite.... :-)   Southwark Tibia chorus? I'll use that word "Pshaw!"   >TCL wanted to join forces with H-J on working at Worcester. TCL wanted to install a Tuba on 100inches wind pressure. But, H-J didn't like the idea. Especially as the Tuba would have been affected by the tremulant. As you will know, TCL tremulants always work on the whole organ.   Not one shred of truth in any of this, for those who don't know TCLewis organs.   >The joy of Southwark Cathedral, listening to the full organ, dominated by the Tibia chorus and the high pressure (50inches) reeds. All of this with the tremulant shaking the building.   Likewise.   Haarrruuuummmmmpppppphhhhhhh!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! [[ :-) ]]   Ross    
(back) Subject: Organ Crawl in Gainesville, Florida From: "Will Scarboro" <whs1325@yahoo.com> Date: Wed, 26 Jan 2005 05:02:53 -0800 (PST)   Dear List, The Tallahassee chapter of the AGO went on an organ crawl in Gainesville, = Florida last Saturday (Jan. 22). We met at St. John's Episcopal church in = downtown Tallahassee where we loaded up into a St. John's van for the 150 = mile trip to Gainesville. There were seven of us total which made the trip = very easy. Once we arrived in Gainesville we began our crawl at the University of = Florida. We were met by Laura Ellis Associate Professor of Organ, = Carillon, and Harpsichord, and University Organist. She took us into the = University's Memorial Auditorium a large 900 seat English style building = built in 1924. The organ in the Memorial Auditorium was originally built = by the Skinner Organ Company of Boston in 1925 (opus 501). It was rebuilt = by Aeolian-Skinner in 1965 (opus 501A) and again by Moller in 1980. = Additional work was done by Moller in 1992. The organ now stands at five = manuals and ninty-nine ranks. The organ stands completely out in the open = in a loft above the stage with minimal casework. The Pedal is on each = side, the Positiv on the loft railing, the Swell above the Positiv on the = first level, the Bombarde in front of the Swell, the Great above the = Swell, and the Choir above the Great. The Trompette en Chamade projects = from the Great casework. About fourteen ranks of Skinner pipes remain in the organ today including the Swell Flute Celeste and Vox = Humana, the Choir Triangle Flute, English Horn, and Clarinet, and the = Pedal, 32' Bourdon and 16' Open Wood. After playing a few pieces for us to demonstrate the organ, Prof. Ellis = took us up to the organ gallery to see the pipework up close. I was the = only one brave enough to climb a very vertical ladder about 30 feet to = visit the Choir organ at the top of the instrument. I saw the beautiful = large wooden pedal pipes and the old Skinner Great Third Diapason which = now speaks as the Pedal 5 1/3' Quint. After finishing the crawl we = returned to the stage where I played the first two movements of Suite = Gothique by Boellman. The organ is quite a thrilling instrument to play = and sounds good in the large space. After viewing the organ, Prof. Ellis took us behind the stage to another = room to view the electronic carillon clavier where she gives carillon = lessons and students practice. We then walked to Century tower where the = University's 61 bell carillon is located. After a long and tiresome climb = up 11 flights of stairs we reached the carillon clavier. Prof. Ellis = played a few selections for us. The original carillon of 49 bells was = installed in 1979 by the Dutch bellfoundry of Koninklijke Eijsbouts of = Asten, The Netherlands. In 2002 a renovation of the carillon was started = and 12 new bells and a new clavier was installed. After finishing at UF we adjourned to Harry's restaurant where we were = joined by members of the Gainesville chapter of the AGO. We all thoroughly = enjoyed the food and the fellowship with fellow AGO members. After lunch we walked a few blocks to First Presbyterian Church where Mark = Coffey showed us the church's three manual fifty-three rank Fisk organ = (opus 119) built in 2002. The organ is quite stunning in the church and = has a very beautiful case. The organ also gave us a little taste of what = we will soon have in Tallahassee as St. John's Episcopal Church should be = getting their new Fisk (opus 127) by the end of this summer. We also = toured the inside of the organ and admired the beautiful craftsmanship of = the instrument. Before leaving the church we also viewed the chapel organ = a one manual and pedal instrument built by A. David Moore. Our final stop on the organ crawl was Holy Trinity Episcopal Church where = we were greeted by Organist/Choirmaster Lee Cobb and Associate Organist = Lorraine Amick. The organ is a three manual fifty-two rank instrument = built by Visser-Rowland in 1994. The instrument is divided on both sides = of the chancel with the manual divisions on the right and the pedal on the = left. The console is located beneath the manual divisions. Although = specified as a Dutch instrument the organ plays Anglican music quite well = and isn't overly bright. The church was rebuilt after a fire destroyed it = in January of 1991. Many of the stained glass windows are replicas of = windows destroyed in the fire. The large window at the back of the church = was the only surviving window from the old church, saved because it was = out for restoration when the fire occurred. After finishing our visit to Holy Trinity we returned to Tallahassee all = of us feeling happy after a wonderful and very enjoyable day. Some = pictures that I took from that day are available for viewing on my website = http://home.comcast.net/~whscarboro/ Click the link marked "Gainesville = Organ Crawl" and while you're there feel free to browse the rest of my = site. Special thanks to our own Don Latham and Roger Ponder, Dean who helped = organize the trip and secure transportation for the trip. Thanks also to = Laura Ellis, Mark Coffey, Lee Cobb, Lorraine Amick, and the Gainesville = chapter of the AGO for being so welcoming and hospitable to us. We hope = you will visit us here in Tallahassee sometime soon so that we may return = the favor. Sincerely, Will Scarboro           --------------------------------- Do you Yahoo!? Meet the all-new My Yahoo! =96 Try it today!
(back) Subject: Re: Question re hybrid organs From: "Bob Elms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au> Date: Wed, 26 Jan 2005 21:10:36 +0800   We have electronic reeds in the pedal organ. They are tuned by a potentiometer - just one knob and the system works fine. I know Ahlborn-Galanti use a sensing system which would be the ideal. However the other system does work. Bob Elms.   ----- Original Message ----- From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> To: <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Wednesday, January 26, 2005 9:18 AM Subject: Re: Question re hybrid organs     > Glenda: > > I'm sorry but we have people on the list who constantly muddy > the waters. My original advise to you is to have a heat sensor > installed on your electronic organ which will virtually keep the > pipes in tune with the electronic voices. Those tuning knobs > are a joke. Now I know what kind of Combo you have. It's obvious. >       -- No virus found in this outgoing message. Checked by AVG Anti-Virus. Version: 7.0.300 / Virus Database: 265.7.3 - Release Date: 24/01/2005    
(back) Subject: Re: "authentic worship" From: "Charles Peery" <cepeery@earthlink.net> Date: Wed, 26 Jan 2005 08:07:19 -0500   Steven, and all,   << what are we to make of very,=A0VERY growing churches that have not=20 compromised one iota on the mission or gospel of the church, and=A0yet=20=   have found that a worship "style" has enhanced greatly the=20 attractiveness of the worship service to the community?>>   <<Might those of us in traditional churches rejoice-in-excelsis when=20 the contemporary church in our community reaches out with the authentic=20=   gospel of the Lord Jesus Christ to another 50 new people EVERY WEEK?>>   I guess my concern is that it seems that people are automatically=20 assuming the high numbers equate to success in spreading the Gospel. =20 In other words, keying off of what Steven said, that 50 new people=20 every week HAS to mean it's all authentic. I'm not so sure we haven't=20=   "compromised one iota on the mission or gospel of the church."   I mean, we know if you want numbers, it WORKS. In other words, choose=20=   worship themes from the headlines, use music that sounds like top 40,=20 reduce all religious iconography to an absolute minimum, choose song=20 texts that are so simple and repetitive that people are free to delve=20 into their interior emotions, sway and lift their hands, claiming to be=20=   in God's Very Presence. I am not trying to snootily look down my nose=20=   at any of this. Unfortunately, my concerns are much larger. What I am=20=   asking is:   What if it's simply wrong? If you have to prove relevance (in other=20 words, people are demanding worship themes that "relate" to their=20 everyday lives and sermons that "teach us how to live", like the=20 self-help shelf at Borders), isn't that just training the worshipper to=20=   ask "What's in it for me?" If anything that might be off-putting is=20 removed because it's too churchy, does that do anything to teach people=20=   about worship or the church? Is the past totally irrelevant? And what=20=   is worship for, is it to go into a personal emotional zone, only=20 facilitated because we are satisfied? And are we training an entire=20 culture of people who enter a worship service for the first time and=20 engage in a mental check list for all the elements they "require" in=20 order to do what they call "worship"? This seems awfully exterior to=20 me. Would we accept such a mindset in, say, our workplace, and allow=20 people to simply claim they couldn't work unless all of their personal=20=   satisfactions were met each time they showed up?   What about the claim of some mega-churches that the structure of these=20=   services was strictly for evangelism, and not for worship? That their=20=   regular members attended DIFFERENT services because they were more=20 mature Christians and needed more substance? And that other churches,=20=   mesmerized by the numbers, copied the seeker-service structure=20 mindlessly and without providing the accompanying real worship services=20=   for their seasoned worshippers? It's like the game of telephone, where=20=   the original intent morphs into something quite different.   What about the very real fact that the large numbers are necessary=20 because the average attendee of a seeker service isn't likely to tithe?=20=   What about the fact that they're also not likely to step right up to=20=   serve on committees?   Not to be paranoid, but, say, IF you believed in darker powers,=20 wouldn't it be quite a coup to dupe large of people to flock to=20 something they THOUGHT was the real thing, except it wasn't the real=20 thing? Steven said:   <<Will we insist on doing it "right" for the few, and criticize=A0others=20=   for doing it "wrong" for thousands of people who are being discipled in=20=   the scriptures, doctrine and =A0Christian living?>>   My question is, what if there really is a "right", and a "wrong", and=20 numbers don't tell the real story?   Chuck Peery St. Louis            
(back) Subject: Re: "authentic worship" From: "Octaaf" <octaaf@charter.net> Date: Wed, 26 Jan 2005 09:17:19 -0600   And this has WHAT to do with organs??? If you insist on writing long OFF TOPIC posts, please have the courtesy to identify them as off topic. Some =   of us are not the least bit interested in religious discussion. Since = when is PipeChat a religous forum?   ----- Original Message ----- From: "Charles Peery" <cepeery@earthlink.net> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Wednesday, January 26, 2005 7:07 AM Subject: Re: "authentic worship"     Steven, and all,   << what are we to make of very, VERY growing churches that have not compromised one iota on the mission or gospel of the church, and yet have found that a worship "style" has enhanced greatly the attractiveness of the worship service to the community?>>   <<Might those of us in traditional churches rejoice-in-excelsis when the contemporary church in our community reaches out with the authentic gospel of the Lord Jesus Christ to another 50 new people EVERY WEEK?>>   I guess my concern is that it seems that people are automatically assuming the high numbers equate to success in spreading the Gospel. In other words, keying off of what Steven said, that 50 new people every week HAS to mean it's all authentic. I'm not so sure we haven't "compromised one iota on the mission or gospel of the church."   I mean, we know if you want numbers, it WORKS. In other words, choose worship themes from the headlines, use music that sounds like top 40, reduce all religious iconography to an absolute minimum, choose song texts that are so simple and repetitive that people are free to delve into their interior emotions, sway and lift their hands, claiming to be in God's Very Presence. I am not trying to snootily look down my nose at any of this. Unfortunately, my concerns are much larger. What I am asking is:   What if it's simply wrong? If you have to prove relevance (in other words, people are demanding worship themes that "relate" to their everyday lives and sermons that "teach us how to live", like the self-help shelf at Borders), isn't that just training the worshipper to ask "What's in it for me?" If anything that might be off-putting is removed because it's too churchy, does that do anything to teach people about worship or the church? Is the past totally irrelevant? And what is worship for, is it to go into a personal emotional zone, only facilitated because we are satisfied? And are we training an entire culture of people who enter a worship service for the first time and engage in a mental check list for all the elements they "require" in order to do what they call "worship"? This seems awfully exterior to me. Would we accept such a mindset in, say, our workplace, and allow people to simply claim they couldn't work unless all of their personal satisfactions were met each time they showed up?   What about the claim of some mega-churches that the structure of these services was strictly for evangelism, and not for worship? That their regular members attended DIFFERENT services because they were more mature Christians and needed more substance? And that other churches, mesmerized by the numbers, copied the seeker-service structure mindlessly and without providing the accompanying real worship services for their seasoned worshippers? It's like the game of telephone, where the original intent morphs into something quite different.   What about the very real fact that the large numbers are necessary because the average attendee of a seeker service isn't likely to tithe? What about the fact that they're also not likely to step right up to serve on committees?   Not to be paranoid, but, say, IF you believed in darker powers, wouldn't it be quite a coup to dupe large of people to flock to something they THOUGHT was the real thing, except it wasn't the real thing? Steven said:   <<Will we insist on doing it "right" for the few, and criticize others for doing it "wrong" for thousands of people who are being discipled in the scriptures, doctrine and Christian living?>>   My question is, what if there really is a "right", and a "wrong", and numbers don't tell the real story?   Chuck Peery St. Louis             ****************************************************************** "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org>      
(back) Subject: Re: "authentic worship" From: "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> Date: Wed, 26 Jan 2005 10:23:45 -0500   Gee, I would have thought that the term "worship" in the subject line might have been a clue that it was a topic in which you would have no interest. Why not just delete those posts next time without reading them?   Randy Runyon     On Jan 26, 2005, at 10:17 AM, Octaaf wrote:   > And this has WHAT to do with organs??? If you insist on writing long > OFF TOPIC posts, please have the courtesy to identify them as off > topic. Some of us are not the least bit interested in religious > discussion. Since when is PipeChat a religous forum?    
(back) Subject: Re: "authentic worship" From: "Charles Peery" <cepeery@earthlink.net> Date: Wed, 26 Jan 2005 09:43:25 -0600 (GMT-06:00)   Thanks, Randy, I did go to the trouble or changing the subject line so people would know = what the post was about. Apologies to the list if necessary, but I = thought we'd already established where the majority of pipe organs are = located, and for what they are used. Or not used. Chuck   -----Original Message----- From: Randolph Runyon <runyonr@muohio.edu> Sent: Jan 26, 2005 9:23 AM To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Subject: Re: "authentic worship"   Gee, I would have thought that the term "worship" in the subject line might have been a clue that it was a topic in which you would have no interest. Why not just delete those posts next time without reading them?   Randy Runyon     On Jan 26, 2005, at 10:17 AM, Octaaf wrote:   > And this has WHAT to do with organs??? If you insist on writing long > OFF TOPIC posts, please have the courtesy to identify them as off > topic. Some of us are not the least bit interested in religious > discussion. Since when is PipeChat a religous forum?     ****************************************************************** "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org>      
(back) Subject: RE: Question re hybrid organs From: "Will Light" <will.light@btinternet.com> Date: Wed, 26 Jan 2005 15:55:39 -0000   Is this the right way round Richard? As a mere physicist and not an organ technician, I would have thought that flue pipes, particularly metal ones, would EXPAND when the temperature RISES, and therefore get LONGER. Longer pipes equals lower notes which means the notes should, according to my physicist's theory, get FLATTER. Is your statement correct, and if so, why does my theory fall down?   Will Light Coventry UK   -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of F. Richard Burt   SNIP! When a cold spell comes along, the wind blown flues will go flat. Most of the reeds will stay about where they were, if they are made of good stuff and have been properly voiced in the room. When the heat waves set in, the wind blown flues go sharp. Again, the reeds may stay close to their properly tuned pitches. SNIP!    
(back) Subject: RE: Question re hybrid organs From: "Will Light" <will.light@btinternet.com> Date: Wed, 26 Jan 2005 16:02:57 -0000   I think the answer to this problem would be as follows. I got this idea = from our situation several years ago when we installed a Conn electronic = theatre organ in a small room which was made from an old stable and coach house = in a friend's garden. The room could seat about 50 people at a pinch but was = far too small to have any natural reverberation. We installed an electronic reverberation unit which had an input from a microphone suspended in the roof, and then about 3 or 4 sets of speakers placed at varying distances from the organ, fed from amplifiers which had a delay line in the input. = The organ sound was immensely improved by this, and even clapping your hands = in the room sounded as if you were in a cathedral or something... If no reverberation was placed onto the digital voices but the ROOM was = equipped with such a reverberation system, then the digital and the pipe voices = would all be "riverbed" to the same extent, and the problem solved! Just my non-expert 0.02 worth...=20 Will Light Coventry UK   -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of Vincent S. Parks, III Sent: 26 January 2005 05:10 To: 'PipeChat' Subject: RE: Question re hybrid organs   Does anyone have an answer to the question from Russ regarding reverberation?   I remember hearing Hector Olivera play a dedication concert on a combo job in town a few years ago. (I think it was about 12 ranks of pipes and a 4 manual digital job.) The tuning was fine, but the acoustical effects were ridiculous. The room is relatively dry so pipe produced sound stopped promptly while the digital sound had an enormous and exaggerated amount of reverberation. Even a novice seated nearby remarked that the sound was peculiar "...when Hector let go of everything some things hung around too long". Organists actually got to chuckling at how detached playing led to some sounds decaying rapidly while others hung on past the next few notes.   Vince Parks   -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of Russ Greene Sent: Tuesday, January 25, 2005 10:28 AM To: PipeChat Subject: Re: Question re hybrid organs     The hybrid installations which I am most familiar with have minimal=20 problems with tuning - sensors adjust the digital voices and that's=20 pretty much that.   However, several of them have nasty problems with acoustics,=20 particularly in "dead" buildings. The digital side often has enhanced=20 acoustics, adding reverb, etc. to simulate a more live environment;=20 equivalent enhancement is seldom practical on the pipe side, so the=20 pipe voices and digital voices sound like they are in different=20 buildings.   In one of our local installations, actually the home church of our only=20 Rodgers dealer, the digital voices sound rich and full and the pipes=20 (principal chorus only, I think) sound like a loud accordian.   How can this problem be addressed?   TTFN, Russ Greene     On Jan 23, 2005, at 8:26 PM, Glenda wrote:   > I am curious about something. On these hybrid organs (i.e., with some   > pipes and some electronic stops), are there any chronic problems with=20 > keeping the two different genres in tune with each other? I am=20 > particularly interested in situations where the building isn't=20 > constantly kept within a certain range of temperature (i.e., the=20 > heat/AC is kept off when church services aren't being held).     ****************************************************************** "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org>         ****************************************************************** "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org>