PipeChat Digest #5124 - Friday, January 28, 2005
 
Re: J.V. Roberts
  by "J C Henderson" <jhender@rscm.u-net.com>
Re: "Pshaw" and other archaic terms
  by <RVScara@aol.com>
Performance Announcement if you're in the area
  by "Tom Hoehn" <thoehn@theatreorgans.com>
Re: J.V. Roberts
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net>
P'shaw
  by "Judy A. Ollikkala" <71431.2534@compuserve.com>
J. Varley Roberts
  by "Bob Elms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au>
RE: "Pshaw" and other archaic terms
  by "Will Light" <will.light@btinternet.com>
Re: J. Varley Roberts
  by "Karl Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu>
PipeChat IRC this evening,
  by "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca>
Re: New MP3 avaialable - Richard White's Toccata
  by "Jonathan Orwig" <giwro@adelphia.net>
Re: J. Varley Roberts
  by "Noel Stoutenburg" <mjolnir@ticnet.com>
Re: "Pshaw" and other archaic terms
  by "N. Russotto" <ravenrockdesigns@gmail.com>
The 10 Commandments
  by "N. Russotto" <ravenrockdesigns@gmail.com>
Re: The 10 Commandments
  by "Alicia Zeilenga" <azeilenga@theatreorgans.com>
Re: The 10 Commandments
  by "Jarle Fagerheim" <jarle_fagerheim@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: "Pshaw" and other archaic terms
  by "Jim McFarland" <mcfarland6@juno.com>
Re: The 10 Commandments
  by "Robert Lind" <lindr@core.com>
Re: The 10 Commandments
  by "Scott Montgomery" <montre1978@yahoo.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: J.V. Roberts From: "J C Henderson" <jhender@rscm.u-net.com> Date: Fri, 28 Jan 2005 23:14:20 +1100   Hi   A snip from my book, but NB formatting lost in e-mail..   Roberts, J.V. England. b. 25th Sep 1841, Stanningley, Leeds, d. 9th Feb 1920, Oxford John Varley Roberts took up his first organ post at the age of twelve. After serving at Halifax Parish Church he became organist of Magdalen College Oxford, though, according to Watkins-Shaw in The Succession of Organists, his playing may not have been top rate. Roberts was an examiner for Oxford University and he composed many anthems together with = part-songs and cantatas. An Andante 1877, Postlude in F 1880 and Larghetto and = Allegro 1885 were in The Organist's Quarterly Journal and later from [NOV]. The Bell Voluntary, A Festival March in C 1902, Pastorale in C (from his cantata "The Story of the Incarnation"), March in D and six books of Three Introductory Voluntaries 1897-1902 (i.e.18 pieces in all) were from [WEE]. Siciliano in F was from [REE] 1879 then [DJK] 1895 and Three Pieces (Andante in F, Diapason Movement in G, Fuga in G) were from [PTM].   Kind regards     John Henderson   +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ Dr. John C. Henderson ARSCM Hon. Librarian, Royal School of Church Music Author of "A Directory of Composers for Organ" http://www.rscm.u-net.com/  
(back) Subject: Re: "Pshaw" and other archaic terms From: <RVScara@aol.com> Date: Fri, 28 Jan 2005 08:17:08 EST   Will, best I can make of it is: When you see the caboose (little red car) pass, the train is (all) gone.  
(back) Subject: Performance Announcement if you're in the area From: "Tom Hoehn" <thoehn@theatreorgans.com> Date: Fri, 28 Jan 2005 08:40:21 -0500   "Arts from the Heart", a concert at The First United Methodist Church, = 411 Turner Street, Clearwater, Florida on February 11th at 7:30pm will = be presented by the Music Department Staff. Performers include Roger = Burke, Rita Fandrich, Marsha Hartman, Tom Hoehn and Bradley Swope. Music = will be from Bach, Debussy, Liszt, Mozart and theater tunes including = Phantom of the Opera. Tickets are $15.00 per person. Reception to follow = with an accent on chocolate and other delectables. Tickets on sale = before or after church services, from Music Committee members, at the = performance or by contacting Dick Shelly (727) 466-6808 or Bradley Swope = (727)446-5955 or (727) 224-4934   Tom Hoehn, Organist Roaring 20's Pizza & Pipes, Ellenton, FL (substitute - 4/42 Wurlitzer) First United Methodist Church, Clearwater, FL (4/9?- = Rodgers/Ruffati/Wicks) Manasota/OATOS/HiloBay/CIC-ATOS/VotS-ATOS/DTOS http://theatreorgans.com/tomhoehn http://launch.groups.yahoo.com/group/TOUploads/      
(back) Subject: Re: J.V. Roberts From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net> Date: Fri, 28 Jan 2005 08:28:55 -0600   I don't know much about J. Varley Roberts apart from the fact that he = was organist of Magdalen College, Oxford, but there is one anecdote told = about him that I cannot resist retelling. Whenever anyone in the = congregation in Magdalen College was so presumptuous as to sing along = with the choir, Roberts would lean over the edge of the gallery and = yell, "Shut up!" On one occasion the gentleman concerned protested, = saying, "This is, after all, the House of God!" "True," responded = Roberts, "But it is also Madgalen College Chapel, and I will thank you = to hold your peace, sir!"   By the way, May 1st. is a Sunday this year, and we have decided to do = the Magdalen "Hymnus Eucharisticus" as an introit. Is anyone else doing = it?=20   John Speller, St. Mark's Episcopal Church, St. Louis, MO. ----- Original Message -----=20 From: SWF12262@aol.com=20 To: pipechat@pipechat.org=20 Sent: Friday, January 28, 2005 12:14 AM Subject: J.V. Roberts     My choir will be singing one of their favorite old war horses this = Sunday -- Seek Ye the Lord by J.V. Roberts. Does anyone have any = biographical information about this composer they'd be willing to share? = I've had no luck finding anything!
(back) Subject: P'shaw From: "Judy A. Ollikkala" <71431.2534@compuserve.com> Date: Fri, 28 Jan 2005 09:36:44 -0500   "Ain't, man, when the little red house makes by, the train is all"???   I believe Merry is saying: "When the red caboose is gone by the train has left"   Judy Ollikkala -- a "train nut" as well as a "pipe organ nut".  
(back) Subject: J. Varley Roberts From: "Bob Elms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au> Date: Fri, 28 Jan 2005 22:52:52 +0800   We have two of Roberts' anthems in our library. One if Seek ye the Lord, = the one mentioned before. The other is "Oh Saviour of the World", a rather impressive Lenten anthem. Bob Elms.       -- No virus found in this outgoing message. Checked by AVG Anti-Virus. Version: 7.0.300 / Virus Database: 265.7.5 - Release Date: 26/01/2005    
(back) Subject: RE: "Pshaw" and other archaic terms From: "Will Light" <will.light@btinternet.com> Date: Fri, 28 Jan 2005 15:12:42 -0000   Thanks for that! Your mention of the "little red car" reminds me of the = most delightful piece of serendipity which occurred during our recent visit = to New York City in the first week of January.   =20   We chanced upon a little restaurant with a "cabaret back room" and found that the performer the following night was an artist whom my wife and I = both loved way back in the 1960s before we had even met each other - we both cried out in unison - "Look - it's Blossom Dearie". We neither of us had heard anything about Blossom for many a long year and we were surprised = to see that she is still with us. Anyway, we were lucky enough to get seats = for the performance on 8th January.   =20   What has that to do with the "little red car"? Well, one of Blossom's wonderful comic songs which she puts over just as well now at the age of = 79 as she did in the 60's is called Bruce. It is addressed to a rather unconvincing transvestite called Bruce, and one of the verses begins as follows:   =20   Bruce!   You've gotta reduce,   Spruce up that caboose, Bruce,   Or wear something loose, Bruce.   Those Gloria Vanderbilt jeans seem undersize,   Thunder thighs!   Etc.   You get the picture!   =20   =20   Will Light Coventry UK   -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of RVScara@aol.com Sent: 28 January 2005 13:17 To: pipechat@pipechat.org Subject: Re: "Pshaw" and other archaic terms   =20   Will, best I can make of it is:   =20   When you see the caboose (little red car) pass, the train is (all) gone.    
(back) Subject: Re: J. Varley Roberts From: "Karl Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu> Date: Fri, 28 Jan 2005 12:14:49 -0500   > We have two of Roberts' anthems in our library. One if Seek ye the Lord, = the > one mentioned before. The other is "Oh Saviour of the World", a rather > impressive Lenten anthem.   Is this in any similar to the same anthem "O Savior Of the World" by St. Paul's (London) Cathedral organist John Goss? Is it still in print?   The other J. Varley Roberts anthem of some note is that for Pentecost, "Peace I Leave With You." It also has a tenor solo and eventually with choir joining the soloist. In America it was also an old-time G. Schirmer publication, if I recall correctly.   Karl E. Moyer Lancaster PA      
(back) Subject: PipeChat IRC this evening, From: "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca> Date: Fri, 28 Jan 2005 13:09:58 -0500   All members of PipeChat are invited to join us in the PipeChat IRC any Friday and Monday evening - beginning at 9.00 PM Eastern Time.   To find out more about the Chat room, or how to get into it, go to PipeChat-L web page at http://www.pipechat.org/   You will find out all you need to know to join us.   Tonight at 9.00 PM, - I hope that we will see you there.   Cheers,   Bob Conway     ****************************************************************** "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org>       ****************************************************************** "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org>      
(back) Subject: Re: New MP3 avaialable - Richard White's Toccata From: "Jonathan Orwig" <giwro@adelphia.net> Date: Fri, 28 Jan 2005 11:06:29 -0800   It is a fun piece, and actually falls under the fingers much better than one might think...   I hope to offer more examples of Richard's music in the future - I've got 3 easier pieces of his that are awaiting my attention   Cheers,   -Jonathan   -- Using Opera's revolutionary e-mail client: http://www.opera.com/m2/  
(back) Subject: Re: J. Varley Roberts From: "Noel Stoutenburg" <mjolnir@ticnet.com> Date: Fri, 28 Jan 2005 13:31:03 -0600   Karl Moyer wrote WRT:   > anthem "O Savior Of the World" by >St. Paul's (London) Cathedral organist John Goss? Is it still in print? > > Yes; in the New Church Anthem Book by OUP; I believe it is also available from CPDL.   ns  
(back) Subject: Re: "Pshaw" and other archaic terms From: "N. Russotto" <ravenrockdesigns@gmail.com> Date: Fri, 28 Jan 2005 15:22:08 -0500   I'd like to see pictures of Jim's shape notes. . .   Nicholas     On Thu, 27 Jan 2005 12:50:30 -0500, Jim McFarland <mcfarland6@juno.com> = wrote: > > > On Wed, 26 Jan 2005 17:20:51 -0800 (PST) Stephen Roberts > <sroberts01@snet.net> writes: > > Dear List:Just because one hasn't heard a term in the urban Northeast > doesn't mean that it isn't in use elsewhere. It's a very big country > between the two coasts. Be careful whom you call a "provincial", or = whose > speech you deem un-American, for the very terms you cite may have a long = and > venerable, though regional, history. > > > Hear Hear!! > > The only criteria for "proper" English is common usage. I suppose that = can > be held on a regional basis as well. > > Here in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania we have a Mennonite population = (not > Amish, they are a splinter group) numbering in the multiple tens of > thousands. (They're everywhere!) > > A number of words and phrases common among the Mennonites have crept = into > general usage "amongst us English". > > Many of these, I find charming, efficient, and perhaps more descriptive = than > that which is found in your "Funk and Wagnalls." > > "It wonders me that a one-rank zymbel could ever work." > > "That organ should be rebuilt. It has enufa cyphers." > > "You have to run the board-edges over the joinder, if you intend to have > them glue-joined." > > "Slow primaries? Are you sure? What for an action does the organ have?" > > I could go on, but I assume you get the idea. > > Even inflection, amongst the Mennonites, makes more sense. In the = English > phrase "he is 42 years old" the English accent the word "old". Why? = Our > brethren here accent the word "years". Makes more sense to me. > > > > > On Wed, 26 Jan 2005 17:20:51 -0800 (PST) Stephen Roberts > <sroberts01@snet.net> writes: > > To make this at least somewhat on topic: speech was not the only > manifestation of the English roots of rural Southerners. Their musical > tradition also shows strong influences from the folk music of England, > Scotland, Wales, and Ireland. Early American folk melodies are often > pentatonic or modal, a common feature of folksong from the Great Britain = and > Ireland. Just look at a tune like "New Britain" (Amazing Grace) , "Holy > Manna" (Brethren, we have met to worship), or "Light" (Sometimes a light > surprises--one of my favorite tunes from early America), and one will > quickly see what I mean. The last tune, "Light", came from Joshua = Leavitt's > <Christian Lyre> of 1831-32, an original copy of which I have here as I > write this message. It's a very interesting publication; unlike most > shape-note tune books such as B.F. White's "The Sacred Harp", it is on = two > staves. > > > Many of you might find it interesting that the Mennonite congregations = here > that use printed music, utilize shape notes. There are music presses = here > that print all kinds of music in shape notes, even the organ works of = Bach! > All of the Mennonite hymnals and song books which include the music, are > printed in shape notes. > > (By the way, the music in these hymnals is referred to only as the = "notes." > You see, if it is sung, it is not music. Everything that is sung, is = sung > in praise of the Lord. Music, as a term, is reserved for instrumentals = and > secular varieties.) > > > > Jim >     -- Nicholas F. Russotto Somers, Connecticut  
(back) Subject: The 10 Commandments From: "N. Russotto" <ravenrockdesigns@gmail.com> Date: Fri, 28 Jan 2005 15:30:52 -0500   I know I'm known as the Virgil guy, but I had to share this with all of you. . . Nick   The Ten Commandments of Organ Practise Thou shalt practise every day, even if only for a short period. Thou shalt NEVER practise faster than thou canst play perfectly, for it is written: Perfect Practise Makes Perfect. Thou shalt NOT put off working on the hard parts; David did not invite Goliath to come back after tea. Thou shalt work out a usable fingering, inscribe it on thy papyrus and NEVER vary from same, for Fumble Fingers Find Fate Fickle. Thou shalt never apologise for thy playing, nor say "Oops!" when thou makest a mistake, for thou wilt only draw attention to things which otherwise would never be noticed by the thick people. Thou shalt practise each composition in short segments; that thy fingers may not break off more than thy mind can chew. Thou shalt listen ... and not only to organists, for it is written: What this untidy world needs is fewer organists and more musicians who can play the organ Thou shalt NOT play pedals without shoes ... for thy Odor-Eaters may be spent, and besides, it leads to sloppy playing. Thou shalt begin and end each practise session with something thou canst play readily, that thou mayest not be discouraged. Thou shalt always remember that thy practise is a labour of love and that by persistence (oft proved by thyself in other undertakings) thou canst bring to pass many wonders.     -- Nicholas F. Russotto Somers, Connecticut (860) 930-0948 Mobile  
(back) Subject: Re: The 10 Commandments From: "Alicia Zeilenga" <azeilenga@theatreorgans.com> Date: Fri, 28 Jan 2005 14:35:39 -0600   Hmmm. I think I'm more precise wo shoes because I have to work harder at being precise.     Alicia Zeilenga       > Thou shalt NOT play pedals without shoes ... for thy Odor-Eaters may > be spent, and besides, it leads to sloppy playing.      
(back) Subject: Re: The 10 Commandments From: "Jarle Fagerheim" <jarle_fagerheim@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Fri, 28 Jan 2005 22:04:43 +0100   N. Russotto wrote: > I know I'm known as the Virgil guy, but I had to share this with all > of you. . . > Nick > > The Ten Commandments of Organ Practise <snip>   Was it Virgil who came up with this? I've seen it in a Norwegian translation before, without any info about the author.   - Jarle http://jarle.moo.no  
(back) Subject: Re: "Pshaw" and other archaic terms From: "Jim McFarland" <mcfarland6@juno.com> Date: Fri, 28 Jan 2005 17:03:40 -0500     On Fri, 28 Jan 2005 15:22:08 -0500 "N. Russotto" <ravenrockdesigns@gmail.com> writes: > I'd like to see pictures of Jim's shape notes. . .       I will have my Mennonite employee bring some in on Monday. I will scan and send to whoever asks, and provides me with an e-mail to which it is legit to send attachments.   Jim  
(back) Subject: Re: The 10 Commandments From: "Robert Lind" <lindr@core.com> Date: Fri, 28 Jan 2005 17:02:24 -0600   Well, no you really didn't have to share it with everyone. Perhaps you = could start a separate list of fools who find this kind of manqu=E9, = contradictory, unclever drivel important and irresistible.   Robert Lind   ----- Original Message ----- From: N. Russotto <ravenrockdesigns@gmail.com> To: Piporg-l Posting Address <piporg-l@listserv.albany.edu>; PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Friday, January 28, 2005 2:30 PM Subject: The 10 Commandments     > I know I'm known as the Virgil guy, but I had to share this with all > of you. . . > Nick > > The Ten Commandments of Organ Practise > Thou shalt practise every day, even if only for a short period. > Thou shalt NEVER practise faster than thou canst play perfectly, for > it is written: Perfect Practise Makes Perfect. > Thou shalt NOT put off working on the hard parts; David did not invite > Goliath to come back after tea. > Thou shalt work out a usable fingering, inscribe it on thy papyrus and > NEVER vary from same, for Fumble Fingers Find Fate Fickle. > Thou shalt never apologise for thy playing, nor say "Oops!" when thou > makest a mistake, for thou wilt only draw attention to things which > otherwise would never be noticed by the thick people. > Thou shalt practise each composition in short segments; that thy > fingers may not break off more than thy mind can chew. > Thou shalt listen ... and not only to organists, for it is written: > What this untidy world needs is fewer organists and more musicians who > can play the organ > Thou shalt NOT play pedals without shoes ... for thy Odor-Eaters may > be spent, and besides, it leads to sloppy playing. > Thou shalt begin and end each practise session with something thou > canst play readily, that thou mayest not be discouraged. > Thou shalt always remember that thy practise is a labour of love and > that by persistence (oft proved by thyself in other undertakings) thou > canst bring to pass many wonders.    
(back) Subject: Re: The 10 Commandments From: "Scott Montgomery" <montre1978@yahoo.com> Date: Fri, 28 Jan 2005 15:08:11 -0800 (PST)   I find it funny, regardless of the unclever drivel. Why are organists so = mean to each other. Sheesh!   Robert Lind <lindr@core.com> wrote:Well, no you really didn't have to = share it with everyone. Perhaps you could start a separate list of fools who find this kind of manqu=E9, = contradictory, unclever drivel important and irresistible.   Robert Lind   ----- Original Message ----- From: N. Russotto To: Piporg-l Posting Address ; PipeChat     Sent: Friday, January 28, 2005 2:30 PM Subject: The 10 Commandments     > I know I'm known as the Virgil guy, but I had to share this with all > of you. . . > Nick > > The Ten Commandments of Organ Practise > Thou shalt practise every day, even if only for a short period. > Thou shalt NEVER practise faster than thou canst play perfectly, for > it is written: Perfect Practise Makes Perfect. > Thou shalt NOT put off working on the hard parts; David did not invite > Goliath to come back after tea. > Thou shalt work out a usable fingering, inscribe it on thy papyrus and > NEVER vary from same, for Fumble Fingers Find Fate Fickle. > Thou shalt never apologise for thy playing, nor say "Oops!" when thou > makest a mistake, for thou wilt only draw attention to things which > otherwise would never be noticed by the thick people. > Thou shalt practise each composition in short segments; that thy > fingers may not break off more than thy mind can chew. > Thou shalt listen ... and not only to organists, for it is written: > What this untidy world needs is fewer organists and more musicians who > can play the organ > Thou shalt NOT play pedals without shoes ... for thy Odor-Eaters may > be spent, and besides, it leads to sloppy playing. > Thou shalt begin and end each practise session with something thou > canst play readily, that thou mayest not be discouraged. > Thou shalt always remember that thy practise is a labour of love and > that by persistence (oft proved by thyself in other undertakings) thou > canst bring to pass many wonders.     ****************************************************************** "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org List-Subscribe: List-Digest: List-Unsubscribe:         Scott Montgomery 619 W Church St Champaign, IL 61820 217-390-0158 www.ScottMontgomeryMusic.net