PipeChat Digest #5126 - Saturday, January 29, 2005
 
Re: The 10 Commandments
  by <BlueeyedBear@aol.com>
Re: Practice without Shoes
  by "Dominic Scullion" <dominicscullion@email.com>
Re: Practice without Shoes
  by <BlueeyedBear@aol.com>
Re: The ten commandments and accompanying
  by "Emily Adams" <eadams@cinci.rr.com>
Re: The ten commandments and accompanying
  by "Charles Peery" <cepeery@earthlink.net>
Re: J.V. Roberts - Thanks!
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net>
Re: The 10 Commandments
  by "Malcolm Kogut" <mkogut@capital.net>
Re: Practice without Shoes
  by "Malcolm Wechsler \(Mander Organs\)" <manderusa@earthlink.net>
Re: Practice without Shoes
  by "Alicia Zeilenga" <azeilenga@theatreorgans.com>
Re: The 10 Commandments
  by "Octaaf" <octaaf@charter.net>
Re: Practice without Shoes
  by "Scott Montgomery" <montre1978@yahoo.com>
Re: The 10 Commandments
  by "Scott Montgomery" <montre1978@yahoo.com>
Brass and Organ Music
  by "Robert Nickel" <rnickel@charter.net>
Re: The 10 Commandments
  by "Cole" <rcolev@woh.rr.com>
Re: Practice without Shoes
  by "Stephen Best" <stevebest@usadatanet.net>
Re: Re: Practice without Shoes
  by "Hell-Concerts@t-online.de" <Hell-Concerts@t-online.de>
Re: Practice without Shoes
  by "Jarle Fagerheim" <jarle_fagerheim@yahoo.co.uk>
 

(back) Subject: Re: The 10 Commandments From: <BlueeyedBear@aol.com> Date: Sat, 29 Jan 2005 07:37:30 EST   In a message dated 1/29/05 12:52:29 AM Pacific Standard Time, jarle_fagerheim@yahoo.co.uk writes:   > N. Russotto wrote: > >Thou shalt NEVER practise faster than thou canst play perfectly, for > >it is written: Perfect Practise Makes Perfect. > Is it really possible to play something "perfectly" without having the > tempo right? > > - Jarle   i think the point is playing it technically correct at a faster tempo. = with certain pieces i often practice them at a faster tempo so that i can relax = it a bit for performance. that way i don't feel that it's always right at = the edge of falling apart. in other words, if i can play it technically = correct at a faster tempo, then it should be even easier a little slower.   scot  
(back) Subject: Re: Practice without Shoes From: "Dominic Scullion" <dominicscullion@email.com> Date: Sat, 29 Jan 2005 13:00:51 +0000   Could not copy the message to the digest, there was no plain text part
(back) Subject: Re: Practice without Shoes From: <BlueeyedBear@aol.com> Date: Sat, 29 Jan 2005 08:09:35 EST   In a message dated 1/29/05 5:01:10 AM Pacific Standard Time, dominicscullion@email.com writes:   > Does it really matter whether you practice with shoes or not? NO. If one =   > finds it easier to do that, then no-one should be able to stop them. It = doesn't > matter if world famous organists do so or not, it is a personal choice.   i had a teacher who, when asked about 'authentic fingering,' said, "i = don't care if you play it with your elbows as long as it sounds correct."   scot  
(back) Subject: Re: The ten commandments and accompanying From: "Emily Adams" <eadams@cinci.rr.com> Date: Sat, 29 Jan 2005 08:32:18 -0500   Responding to one of the Commandments, Jarle said: "Is it really possible = to play something 'perfectly' without having the tempo right?"   Good point <g>. Can't tell if you were being very literal or joking a bit. =   The Commandments did make me think, since it's been a lot of years since = my last piano or organ lesson.   Particularly with my choral accompanying I tend to try to practice up to tempo right from the start, thinking that I don't have much time to get = that point and if I'm going to have to fake in places I'd better learn how and where *right now.* But obviously, slower practice involving getting all = the notes in and getting them all right will lead to a better final result.   For those of you who can't play most accompaniments perfectly right from = the start, how do you handle this trade-off?   P.S. Follow up on my panickey post about The Last Words of Jesus accompaniment: after many hours I finally was getting a reasonable approximation of the difficult first section, and had even had a brief conversation about it with the director, who (a) obviously realized the section was challenging and (b) expected I wwas up to figuring out a way = to handle it. Then last week she handed out the list of anthems through the = end of April, and guess what wasn't on it?   I know this is an ongoing problem for lots of us, and although my first inclination was to be angry and resentful, I decided it would be more productive to look at the time and effort I spent as a forced way to = improve my piano and accompanying technique. Sometimes it's tough to be positive! but so far it seems to be working for me. Over the past 7 months she's ditched maybe 10% of the things she's given me, which doesn't seem too = bad.        
(back) Subject: Re: The ten commandments and accompanying From: "Charles Peery" <cepeery@earthlink.net> Date: Sat, 29 Jan 2005 07:51:58 -0500   Regarding accompanying and Emily's comment about working on something her director then ditched:   Having been on both sides of this issue, I think your attitude about looking it as "forced technique development", rather than being angry, is the best one. Having had an accompanist/organist for 22 years, I always tried to give her music 10 weeks ahead... one of our organists had a doctorate in organ performance, so it wasn't like she needed lots of prep time, but it was a matter of professionalism and respect. However, I'd occasionally have to change something (the choir didn't learn it, it snowed, the pastor changed a sermon title) and felt kinda stupid doing it.   When the tables were turned and I was "just" the organist, I got to experience this from the other side. However, this was a professional choir, and my problem was the opposite. They'd pass out something wild on a Thursday night and plan to sing it on Sunday because they'd all sung it before. And it would be an oratorio reduction or some Bairstow piece or William Mathias, or.. Sowerby, and I'd be thinking "How the H*LL am I going to work this out on a two manual instrument with 5 generals before Sunday, much less play it well in rehearsal?"   I called up my doctorate-friend and said "What do I do about "<insert name of piece here>". She said, "Yeah, that tune has a lot of notes. Here's my secret: don't play them all." And, I said "Oh, my, I can't do that, somebody will notice." She said "I bet not. And anyway, look at it like a game: how much can I leave out before somebody says something?" Well, we both laughed, and I took her advice. I'm not saying routinely, but when something came along that was just out of line, I'd adapt. And no one ever said a thing.   So, I think being gracious and keeping things flowing forward is a really valued skill in an accompanist. Even if it means some frustration and adaptation.   Chuck Peery St. Louis   On Jan 29, 2005, at 8:32 AM, Emily Adams wrote:   > Responding to one of the Commandments, Jarle said: "Is it really > possible to play something 'perfectly' without having the tempo > right?" > > Good point <g>. Can't tell if you were being very literal or joking a > bit. The Commandments did make me think, since it's been a lot of > years since my last piano or organ lesson. > > Particularly with my choral accompanying I tend to try to practice up > to tempo right from the start, thinking that I don't have much time to > get that point and if I'm going to have to fake in places I'd better > learn how and where *right now.* But obviously, slower practice > involving getting all the notes in and getting them all right will > lead to a better final result. > > For those of you who can't play most accompaniments perfectly right > from the start, how do you handle this trade-off? > > P.S. Follow up on my panickey post about The Last Words of Jesus > accompaniment: after many hours I finally was getting a reasonable > approximation of the difficult first section, and had even had a brief > conversation about it with the director, who (a) obviously realized > the section was challenging and (b) expected I wwas up to figuring out > a way to handle it. Then last week she handed out the list of anthems > through the end of April, and guess what wasn't on it? > > I know this is an ongoing problem for lots of us, and although my > first inclination was to be angry and resentful, I decided it would be > more productive to look at the time and effort I spent as a forced way > to improve my piano and accompanying technique. Sometimes it's tough > to be positive! but so far it seems to be working for me. Over the > past 7 months she's ditched maybe 10% of the things she's given me, > which doesn't seem too bad. > > > > > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> >    
(back) Subject: Re: J.V. Roberts - Thanks! From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net> Date: Sat, 29 Jan 2005 09:01:32 -0600   One of my favorite transit inflation stories concerned my wife's = great-uncle Chalmers, who was an architect with a number of = eccentricities. One of these was that his hobby was painting nude = women -- he was a very fine artist, though one wonders why he was so = interested in naked women when he himself was gay. He used to carefully = segregate his left and right socks and send them to different laundries. = In those days in New York the Fifth Avenue bus was run by one company = and cost 10c while the Madison Avenue bus was run by another company and = cost 5c. Uncle Chalmers used therefore to walk down Fifth Avenue to his = office every morning because he was saving twice as much money by not = taking the bus.   John peller ----- Original Message -----=20 From: SWF12262@aol.com=20 To: pipechat@pipechat.org=20 Sent: Saturday, January 29, 2005 12:38 AM Subject: Re: J.V. Roberts - Thanks!     About this, my father would probably remark, "That and two bits will = get you on the El." In his day the elevated trains of the Chicago = Transit Authority charged 25 cents! There's got to be a joke in there = about sic transit gloria mundi and inflation, but I'm too tired to look = for it.
(back) Subject: Re: The 10 Commandments From: "Malcolm Kogut" <mkogut@capital.net> Date: Sat, 29 Jan 2005 09:03:32 -0500   >>Thou shalt NEVER practise faster than thou canst play perfectly, for it is written: Perfect Practise Makes Perfect. Is it really possible to = play something "perfectly" without having the tempo right?<   I think the logic is to avoid rushing into playing and developing bad = habits like dual muscular pulls, ulnar and radial deviation, poorly = executed in/out shifts and such. Once those movements are in your = playing, it takes slow and attentive practice (again) to get them out. = If ever.   Why take the time to break bad habits when you don't need them in the = first place? It's not about the song. It is about the fulcrum, = rubber-bands, weight and levers of this saline based machine.   -Malcolm. mkogut@capital.net Rotterdam, NY
(back) Subject: Re: Practice without Shoes From: "Malcolm Wechsler \(Mander Organs\)" <manderusa@earthlink.net> Date: Sat, 29 Jan 2005 11:33:21 -0500   My Organist friend in London, David Liddle, who is blind, does not wear shoes when playing, and anyone who has heard him recognizes in him a consummate virtuoso. Contrary to what one might think, he says that = playing shoeless came not from a wish for more sensitivity in feeling the pedal = keys or toe studs, but rather because of occasional difficulty in finding out exactly where he left his shoes! There is no pedal obstacle he cannot meet =   shoeless, and he certainly fulfills Monty's category as a professional Organist (as well as a well-published composer of Organ music).   Please go to his Website at www.davidliddle.org and then go to the photo gallery, where you will find the following two relevant items, in which David points to his shoeless playing:   1. "David [practising] at the Newberry Memorial Organ at Woolsey Hall, = Yale (USA) with his Perkins Braille Writer (and without shoes)." 2. "Bestockinged feet practising at Notre-Dame de Paris - May 2002."   The fact that David mentions his unshod state tells you that he is often questioned about this. He clearly is not the exception that "proves the rule," but is rather one who casts doubt upon it. Go to = www.organsociety.org and click on online catalogue and you will find three of David's recordings - yes, no shoes! Your doubts will be put to rest.   There has been a great deal of commentary about Felix Aprahamian on the Lists, sadly, most recently in connection with his death. On David's Website, there is a very nice photograph of David, Felix, and a lovely Yellow Lab Guide Dog.   Cheers to you all,   Malcolm Wechsler - putting on his Organmasters!     ----- Original Message ----- From: <RMB10@aol.com> To: <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Friday, January 28, 2005 11:59 PM Subject: Practice without Shoes     > >Hmmm. I think I'm more precise wo shoes because I have to work harder = at >>being precise. >> >>Alicia Zeilenga > > > I'm surprised that in college that an organ professor would let you get > away > with playing without shoes. Professional organists play with shoes, > whether > practicing or performing--you'd never see people like Dame Gillian Weir, > Marilyn Keiser, Marilyn Mason, Joyce Jones, or even Diane Bish play > without their > shoes. You need shoes for leverage, for support while operating swell > shoes, > and to protect your toes when hitting toe studs. > > Monty Bennett      
(back) Subject: Re: Practice without Shoes From: "Alicia Zeilenga" <azeilenga@theatreorgans.com> Date: Sat, 29 Jan 2005 10:34:19 -0600   I didn't say I went to lessons wo shoes. We have to wear shoes for lessons and studio, but he encourages us to try other things too. Alicia Zeilenga "Santa Caecilia, ora pro nobis"     -----Original Message----- From: RMB10@aol.com To: pipechat@pipechat.org Date: Fri, 28 Jan 2005 23:59:21 EST Subject: Practice without Shoes   > >Hmmm. I think I'm more precise wo shoes because I have to work harder > at > >being precise. > > > >Alicia Zeilenga > > > I'm surprised that in college that an organ professor would let you get > away > with playing without shoes. Professional organists play with shoes, > whether > practicing or performing--you'd never see people like Dame Gillian > Weir, > Marilyn Keiser, Marilyn Mason, Joyce Jones, or even Diane Bish play > without their > shoes. You need shoes for leverage, for support while operating swell > shoes, > and to protect your toes when hitting toe studs. > > Monty Bennett > > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> >      
(back) Subject: Re: The 10 Commandments From: "Octaaf" <octaaf@charter.net> Date: Sat, 29 Jan 2005 10:44:26 -0600   Or maybe the great and wise Mr. Lind could just hit the "Delete" key as he =   so eloquently tells those of us who are less than impressed by his = arrogance and scat attittudes.   T ----- Original Message ----- From: "Robert Lind" <lindr@core.com> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Cc: <PIPORG-L@listserv.albany.edu> Sent: Friday, January 28, 2005 5:02 PM Subject: Re: The 10 Commandments     > Well, no you really didn't have to share it with everyone. Perhaps you > could > start a separate list of fools who find this kind of manqu=E9, > contradictory, > unclever drivel important and irresistible. > > Robert Lind > > ----- Original Message ----- > From: N. Russotto <ravenrockdesigns@gmail.com> > To: Piporg-l Posting Address <piporg-l@listserv.albany.edu>; PipeChat > <pipechat@pipechat.org> > Sent: Friday, January 28, 2005 2:30 PM > Subject: The 10 Commandments > > >> I know I'm known as the Virgil guy, but I had to share this with all >> of you. . . >> Nick >> >> The Ten Commandments of Organ Practise >> Thou shalt practise every day, even if only for a short period. >> Thou shalt NEVER practise faster than thou canst play perfectly, for >> it is written: Perfect Practise Makes Perfect. >> Thou shalt NOT put off working on the hard parts; David did not invite >> Goliath to come back after tea. >> Thou shalt work out a usable fingering, inscribe it on thy papyrus and >> NEVER vary from same, for Fumble Fingers Find Fate Fickle. >> Thou shalt never apologise for thy playing, nor say "Oops!" when thou >> makest a mistake, for thou wilt only draw attention to things which >> otherwise would never be noticed by the thick people. >> Thou shalt practise each composition in short segments; that thy >> fingers may not break off more than thy mind can chew. >> Thou shalt listen ... and not only to organists, for it is written: >> What this untidy world needs is fewer organists and more musicians who >> can play the organ >> Thou shalt NOT play pedals without shoes ... for thy Odor-Eaters may >> be spent, and besides, it leads to sloppy playing. >> Thou shalt begin and end each practise session with something thou >> canst play readily, that thou mayest not be discouraged. >> Thou shalt always remember that thy practise is a labour of love and >> that by persistence (oft proved by thyself in other undertakings) thou >> canst bring to pass many wonders. > > > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> > >    
(back) Subject: Re: Practice without Shoes From: "Scott Montgomery" <montre1978@yahoo.com> Date: Sat, 29 Jan 2005 08:52:30 -0800 (PST)   Actually, if you are playing on a flat pedal-board, especially and Arp = Schnitger organ, it is easier to play in regular shoes or without. The = pedals are so far apart that normal organ shoes become problematic. My = two cents.     Scott Montgomery 619 W Church St Champaign, IL 61820 217-390-0158 www.ScottMontgomeryMusic.net  
(back) Subject: Re: The 10 Commandments From: "Scott Montgomery" <montre1978@yahoo.com> Date: Sat, 29 Jan 2005 08:53:10 -0800 (PST)   I think another AMEN is needed   Octaaf <octaaf@charter.net> wrote:Or maybe the great and wise Mr. Lind = could just hit the "Delete" key as he so eloquently tells those of us who are less than impressed by his = arrogance and scat attittudes.   T ----- Original Message ----- From: "Robert Lind"   To: "PipeChat"   Cc:   Sent: Friday, January 28, 2005 5:02 PM Subject: Re: The 10 Commandments     > Well, no you really didn't have to share it with everyone. Perhaps you > could > start a separate list of fools who find this kind of manqu=E9, > contradictory, > unclever drivel important and irresistible. > > Robert Lind > > ----- Original Message ----- > From: N. Russotto > To: Piporg-l Posting Address ; PipeChat >   > Sent: Friday, January 28, 2005 2:30 PM > Subject: The 10 Commandments > > >> I know I'm known as the Virgil guy, but I had to share this with all >> of you. . . >> Nick >> >> The Ten Commandments of Organ Practise >> Thou shalt practise every day, even if only for a short period. >> Thou shalt NEVER practise faster than thou canst play perfectly, for >> it is written: Perfect Practise Makes Perfect. >> Thou shalt NOT put off working on the hard parts; David did not invite >> Goliath to come back after tea. >> Thou shalt work out a usable fingering, inscribe it on thy papyrus and >> NEVER vary from same, for Fumble Fingers Find Fate Fickle. >> Thou shalt never apologise for thy playing, nor say "Oops!" when thou >> makest a mistake, for thou wilt only draw attention to things which >> otherwise would never be noticed by the thick people. >> Thou shalt practise each composition in short segments; that thy >> fingers may not break off more than thy mind can chew. >> Thou shalt listen ... and not only to organists, for it is written: >> What this untidy world needs is fewer organists and more musicians who >> can play the organ >> Thou shalt NOT play pedals without shoes ... for thy Odor-Eaters may >> be spent, and besides, it leads to sloppy playing. >> Thou shalt begin and end each practise session with something thou >> canst play readily, that thou mayest not be discouraged. >> Thou shalt always remember that thy practise is a labour of love and >> that by persistence (oft proved by thyself in other undertakings) thou >> canst bring to pass many wonders. > > > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: > List-Digest: > List-Unsubscribe: > >     ****************************************************************** "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org List-Subscribe: List-Digest: List-Unsubscribe:         Scott Montgomery 619 W Church St Champaign, IL 61820 217-390-0158 www.ScottMontgomeryMusic.net  
(back) Subject: Brass and Organ Music From: "Robert Nickel" <rnickel@charter.net> Date: Sat, 29 Jan 2005 10:57:13 -0600   Can anyone point me in the direction of some medium-easy, non-hymn based music for brass quintet and organ? Please reply privately.   Thanks.   Bob Nickel        
(back) Subject: Re: The 10 Commandments From: "Cole" <rcolev@woh.rr.com> Date: Sat, 29 Jan 2005 11:59:29 -0500   Scott wrote: >Why are organists so mean to each other. Sheesh!   I have always attributed it to "the artistic temperament".   Cole Votaw -- Springfield, Ohio, USA     -- No virus found in this outgoing message. Checked by AVG Anti-Virus. Version: 7.0.300 / Virus Database: 265.8.2 - Release Date: 1/28/2005      
(back) Subject: Re: Practice without Shoes From: "Stephen Best" <stevebest@usadatanet.net> Date: Sat, 29 Jan 2005 12:17:00 -0500   I'm wondering about the following without shoes:   Langlais "Epilogue" -- where I'd have a tough time playing the chords without shoes.   Thalben-Ball "Variations on a Theme of Paganini" -- can't imagine playing the variation with all the double pedal glissandos without having it be downright painful without shoes.   At least here in Central NY state where the outside temperatures have been hovering around 0 degress F for a few days and churches are mighty cold, I find my feet "freeze" quickly just from contact with a cold pedalboard, let alone a cold room. Shoes really are protection against cold.   All that said, I suppose ANYTHING is possible if one gets accustomed to it! I for one wouldn't dream of playing a note without organ shoes.   Steve Best in Utica, NY   Malcolm Wechsler (Mander Organs) wrote:   > My Organist friend in London, David Liddle, who is blind, does not > wear shoes when playing, and anyone who has heard him recognizes in > him a consummate virtuoso. Contrary to what one might think, he says > that playing shoeless came not from a wish for more sensitivity in > feeling the pedal keys or toe studs, but rather because of occasional > difficulty in finding out exactly where he left his shoes! There is no > pedal obstacle he cannot meet shoeless, and he certainly fulfills > Monty's category as a professional Organist (as well as a > well-published composer of Organ music).        
(back) Subject: Re: Re: Practice without Shoes From: "Hell-Concerts@t-online.de" <Hell-Concerts@t-online.de> Date: Sat, 29 Jan 2005 18:40:26 +0100   In addition to that, as to my best knowledge, the vast majority of organ teachers, among them the most reknown and experienced ones the organ world has available today cathegorically and with reason refuse to even discuss the possibility of pedal playing without appropriate (organ-) shoes. I am already wondering, whether they all might be on the wrong track? Hans-Friedrich Hell     -----Original Message----- Date: Sat, 29 Jan 2005 18:17:00 +0100 Subject: Re: Practice without Shoes From: Stephen Best <stevebest@usadatanet.net> To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org>   I'm wondering about the following without shoes:   Langlais "Epilogue" -- where I'd have a tough time playing the chords without shoes.   Thalben-Ball "Variations on a Theme of Paganini" -- can't imagine playing the variation with all the double pedal glissandos without having it be downright painful without shoes.   At least here in Central NY state where the outside temperatures have been hovering around 0 degress F for a few days and churches are mighty cold, I find my feet "freeze" quickly just from contact with a cold pedalboard, let alone a cold room. Shoes really are protection against cold.   All that said, I suppose ANYTHING is possible if one gets accustomed to it! I for one wouldn't dream of playing a note without organ shoes.   Steve Best in Utica, NY   Malcolm Wechsler (Mander Organs) wrote:   > My Organist friend in London, David Liddle, who is blind, does not > wear shoes when playing, and anyone who has heard him recognizes in > him a consummate virtuoso. Contrary to what one might think, he says > that playing shoeless came not from a wish for more sensitivity in > feeling the pedal keys or toe studs, but rather because of occasional > difficulty in finding out exactly where he left his shoes! There is no > pedal obstacle he cannot meet shoeless, and he certainly fulfills > Monty's category as a professional Organist (as well as a > well-published composer of Organ music).         ****************************************************************** "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org>        
(back) Subject: Re: Practice without Shoes From: "Jarle Fagerheim" <jarle_fagerheim@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Sat, 29 Jan 2005 18:55:59 +0100   Stephen Best wrote: > Thalben-Ball "Variations on a Theme of Paganini" -- can't imagine > playing the variation with all the double pedal glissandos without > having it be downright painful without shoes. A few days ago there was a story in the Norwegian media about a man (not an organist!) who hadn't worn shoes at all since 1990. He even claims that wearing shoes is now extremely uncomfortable to him. It's all about what one is used to.   - Jarle http://jarle.moo.no