PipeChat Digest #5431 - Friday, July 1, 2005
 
RE: snaredrum effect
  by "Will Light" <will.light@btinternet.com>
Re: Optimum editions of the repertoire
  by <ScottFop@aol.com>
Re: ministry vs. job
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Mp3:  Andr=E9 Fleury, Symphonie 1 (re post)
  by "Jonathan Orwig" <giwro@adelphia.net>
Re: Mp3:  Andr=C8 Fleury, Symphonie 1 (repost)
  by "Scott A Montgomery" <montre1978@yahoo.com>
Re: Optimum editions of the repertoire
  by <DarrylbytheSea@aol.com>
Optimum Editions
  by "Desiree'" <nicemusica@yahoo.com>
the instrument is not to be sampled without the builder's express consent
  by "Charlie Lester" <crl@137.com>
=3D?utf-8?Q?Re:_Mp3:__Andr=3DEF=3DBF=3DBD_Fleury,_Symphonie_1_(repost)?=3
  by <giwro@adelphia.net>
AUSTIN ORGANS: TO BE OR NOT TO BE...(x post)
  by <ScottFop@aol.com>
Re: PipeChat   Ministry/literature and ... um.. snaredrums
  by <hydrant@baskerbeagles.com>
RE: AUSTIN ORGANS: TO BE OR NOT TO BE...(x post)
  by "Michael David" <michaelandmaggy@comcast.net>
Re: the instrument is not to be sampled without the builder's express con
  by "Gil Page" <kestrel6@earthlink.net>
Re: PipeChat   Ministry/literature and ... um.. snaredrums
  by "Paul Smith" <kipsmith@getgoin.net>
mp3 repost: Kromolicki Etude #2
  by "Jonathan Orwig" <giwro@adelphia.net>
How would you rank "service" music publishers?
  by "Desiree'" <nicemusica@yahoo.com>
 

(back) Subject: RE: snaredrum effect From: "Will Light" <will.light@btinternet.com> Date: Thu, 30 Jun 2005 10:25:07 +0100   Theatre Organ snare drums are done by hitting a real snare drum - the "escaping wind" device, which is actually a cylinder with very narrow = slots cut in it to make the shoooshing noise when the wind escapes are used on Compton organs to simulate the sound of a Sand Block.   Will Light Coventry UK   -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of Colin Mitchell Sent: 30 June 2005 00:10 To: PipeChat Subject: Re: snaredrum effect   Hello,   Coudn't you buy a snare drum second-hand?   It would be a whole lot easier!   Theatre organs use a rather clever device, but this involves a real drum. I forget exactly, but I seem to recall escaping wind used as a snare-drum effect on certain theatre instruments.   With my imagination running in overdrive, I could only possibly conceive the use of a keen string register, with the hand(s) slapping numerous keys to produce a sort of sizzly, enharmonic noise rather than specific musical notes.   Anyone know any better?   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK   --- blueeyedbear@aol.com wrote:   > can someone tell me how to approximate the effect of > a snaredrum on an organ with no percussion (other > than chimes)? it will basically accompany a > piccolo-like melody.     __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around http://mail.yahoo.com   ****************************************************************** "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org>    
(back) Subject: Re: Optimum editions of the repertoire From: <ScottFop@aol.com> Date: Thu, 30 Jun 2005 07:41:11 EDT   In recent years I have acquired the Barenreiter edition of the Bach works = in the big blue box. In fact I have two complete sets and only remember ordering one! In college, for some reason, we all used Kalmus (I know, yuk!) which if I =   remember were bad xerox copies, so to speak, of the Peters Edition or = something like that. I still have them of course, with mountains of markings and fingerings, and will not part with them, but really do like the = readability and simplicity of the Barenreiter editions. For the Orgelbuchlein there IS only one edition as far as I am concerned, =   and that is the Concordia, edited by John David Peterson. Not only is it = laid out extremely well, but the scholarly information, chorales and history included are invaluable. For Franck, I also have Kalmus from college years, and more recently = bought the Dover edition, which I like very much. Again, I keep my markings and =   notes from studying, but have transferred a lot of it into the Dover. I = also have a wonderful set of notes and errata that was given to me by Robert = Glasgow during a lesson. He is quite a Franck disciple and has a wonderful = insight into the interpretation of his works. (Does anyone have his fabulous = Franck CD from All Saints, Worcester?) My Mendelssohn scores are published by Henle-Verlag and they, too, are = very well printed and readable. So, just my two-cents' worth. -Scott Scott F.Foppiano   In te Domine speravi, non confundar in aeternum.  
(back) Subject: Re: ministry vs. job From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Thu, 30 Jun 2005 04:45:43 -0700 (PDT)   Hello,   I told you....I read it. It's far too long, too repetitive, speculative, pseudo-scientific, full of dull geneology and tribal law, hideously mis-informed about creation and more notable for the sins of omission than the content.   The Jesus bits are good: I'd recommend those, even if the empty tomb thing is a bit far fetched. I mean, whoever heard of a born-again Jew?   Now, if there were 25 hours in a day, I could probably find time to squeeze a bit of Bible into the slot between reading Hansard and falling into comatose sleep, but unfortunately, there aren't.   So I'll have to make do by listening to or playing the Bach "Orgelbuchlein" and looking at the comic-strip Bible my mother bought me, which like "1066 and all that," says it all and still fits in the pocket!   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK     --- "Rev. Tony Newnham" <organist.tony@btinternet.com> wrote:   > Hi > > You really can't find 10 mins a day! That's all you > need to read the entire > Bible in a year.     __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around http://mail.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Mp3: Andr=E9 Fleury, Symphonie 1 (re post) From: "Jonathan Orwig" <giwro@adelphia.net> Date: Thu, 30 Jun 2005 07:33:11 -0700   As part of the research for my Organ Symphonie book, I prepared this recording of Fleury's 1st Symphonie.   It is in 4 movements: 1 - a brooding, restless and turbulent first movement that swirls about and works its way up to forte and back down to pp 2 - a lovely adagio full of beautiful melody and lush harmonies 3 - Scherzo.... comical, stuttering and humorous (and not easy to play!) 4 - your quintessential French Symphonie Finale.... brilliant manual work against an heroic theme   ftp://diapason.dk/toccata/Fleury,%20Andre/Fleury%20sym1.mp3 or *http://tinyurl.com/dhsqx*   Enjoy!   -- Jonathan Orwig Evensong Music, Media and Graphics New Organ and Choral Music http://www.evensongmusic.net    
(back) Subject: Re: Mp3: Andr=C8 Fleury, Symphonie 1 (repost) From: "Scott A Montgomery" <montre1978@yahoo.com> Date: Thu, 30 Jun 2005 12:38:00 -0700 (PDT)   Does anyone have a recording of the second symphony?       Scott Montgomery 1820 Scottsdale Dr. Champaign, IL 61821 217-390-0158 www.ScottMontgomeryMusic.net    
(back) Subject: Re: Optimum editions of the repertoire From: <DarrylbytheSea@aol.com> Date: Thu, 30 Jun 2005 16:02:56 EDT   Concerning the French works, there is no way I would avoid using a French =   score, But we need to be careful in that the are revisions and later = editions, and some of the Kalmus and Dover copies are not the latest editions. I = always find Rollin Smith's Vierne and Franck books to be the place to check = first. I'm not familiar with the Schott publications of French works. I wish you well in your learning of the Piece Heroique -- it's a great piece! In fact, Wilma Jensen is playing it on the postlude concert for the = opening event of our POE/POE+ in Nashville on July 10. If anyone is interested in receiving the flier for the weeks concerts by Felix, Vincent Dubois, Olivier Houette, Tom Trenney, Cherry Rhodes, = Marilyn Keiser, Doug Cleveland, Joanne Schulte, Andrew Risinger, Murray = Somerville, Wilma Jensen, and others, please send me a note privately and I'll forward you = the info. Yours, Darryl  
(back) Subject: Optimum Editions From: "Desiree'" <nicemusica@yahoo.com> Date: Thu, 30 Jun 2005 14:02:12 -0700 (PDT)   The Piece Heroique is really fun to lean, and what I like about the Schott = edidion, is its modern manuscript/printing. I have slight astigmatism and = certain editions are not good for me, because they are not spread out or = big enough. Even the color of paper sometimes creates a probpel for me. = Cream/Manilla colored paper is easiest on my eyes. If its no not that, it = has to be Starch White, with very dark bold, larger notes and have a clean = lay out. This is found in Schott's edition of Franck. TDH   __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around http://mail.yahoo.com
(back) Subject: the instrument is not to be sampled without the builder's express consent From: "Charlie Lester" <crl@137.com> Date: Thu, 30 Jun 2005 16:07:09 -0700   =3D-> ...there are some organbuilders (including some on this very List, as I recall, who specify in the contracts that the instrument is not to be sampled without the builder's express consent. <-=3D     Unless the builder paid for the organ, I really don't see how they have any right to restrict sampling. Nor do I understand why they would want to do so -- other than, I guess, out of spite. Or fear, perhaps.   ~ C    
(back) Subject: =3D?utf-8?Q?Re:_Mp3:__Andr=3DEF=3DBF=3DBD_Fleury,_Symphonie_1_(repost)?=3D From: <giwro@adelphia.net> Date: Thu, 30 Jun 2005 16:34:57 -0700   Yes...   There is a recording on the Aeolus label: http://store.yahoo.com/ohscatalog/homqanfleurv.html   It is a GREAT recording - the organ is definitely idiomatic for this style of music (unlike mine!) as it is the organ of=20 St-Fran=C3=A7ois-Xavier in Paris built in 1878 by Jacques Fermis with subsequent work by Cavaill=C3=A9-Coll (by which time it had 58 stops), Gonzalez and Ephr=C3=A8me, Muller, and Bernard Dargassies in 199= 3.   IMHO Fleury is much underrated (and under-played!). He wrote a raft of fine compositions (not all of which are the unplayable virtuoso type). I've seen the Prelude, andante and Toccata as well as the Variations on a N= oel programmed in concert, but not much else.   There is another Aeolus volume at OHS that has his 24 Pieces, many of whoch make great service music -- Jonathan Orwig http://www.evensongmusic.net New Choral and Organ Music - sample mp3 and pdf files onsite =20 ---- Scott A Montgomery <montre1978@yahoo.com> wrote:=20 > Does anyone have a recording of the second symphony? > =20    
(back) Subject: AUSTIN ORGANS: TO BE OR NOT TO BE...(x post) From: <ScottFop@aol.com> Date: Thu, 30 Jun 2005 21:04:05 EDT   Hi All I am directly inquiring about the Austin Organ Company because I am = hearing so many conflicting reports. Is Austin open, or is Austin GOING to reopen, or not? In the past two weeks I have heard from many individuals in the organ = sales world, including various builders, that they are open, then they aren't = open, then they might open, then donors might be coming to the forefront, then = the state of Connecticut is going to partially fund them, then there is a = very rich buyer in the wings, then there is no one, then they are closed permanently with no hope of reopening, etc etc etc. I have heard this = from organists, organ builders, organ techs, Austin reps and reps of other builders and = many others as well. For God's sake- WHICH IS IT? Someone IN AUTHORITY from the Austin company or the Austin family needs = to make an official, indisputable and very public statement and stop all the =   rumors and speculation. Thank you. Scott F.Foppiano   In te Domine speravi, non confundar in aeternum.  
(back) Subject: Re: PipeChat Ministry/literature and ... um.. snaredrums From: <hydrant@baskerbeagles.com> Date: Thu, 30 Jun 2005 21:22:03 -0400     >From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> >Date: Wed, 29 Jun 2005 08:35:04 -0700 (PDT)   >Read it....found it badly flawed and highly >contrived....moved on to reading music books instead.   Have you seen the movie? The music is wonderful!! ;-)       >From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> >Date: Wed, 29 Jun 2005 13:09:00 -0700 (PDT)   >Miss out on "pipechat", "organofftopic" and "The >Simpsons?" > >NEVER!! Life is too short!!   Now there's a great place to start experiencing Bible stories. My favorite was when the Simpsons fell asleep in church, dreaming some wonderful Biblesque stories (my favorite was when 'moses' parted the Red Sea by having his friends flush many toilets!!)....   Anyway, when they awoke the church was empty and as they opened the front door they noticed the world was on fire and there were four guys on horses riding by. Marge turned to Bart and said, "Oh no! It's the end of the world. I hope you have on clean underwear." Bart responded innocently, "Well, I did!"     >BH >SJE Boston. wrote:   >At St. John's, we start with liturgy when it comes to every move we make. >Organ literature is actually an afterthought.   I think this is very sad. There is so much wonderful symbolism in organ literature, even some that was probably not intended by the composer. Music is the universal language and in "Pulling Out All the Stops" William Albright call the organ the "Vox Delecti" (voice of God). Through its beauty, demonstrated in the literature we play, worshipers are often moved to deeper prayerful thought and inspiration. The Spitit touches souls using language we do not understand.... this is most likely one of them.   I urge you to approach your organ literature with the same spirituality that you approach your Bible reading. You will be amazed. And not only that, you will see how pumping out chorale preludes is so often uninspirational.       >Subject: snaredrum effect >From: <blueeyedbear@aol.com> >Date: Wed, 29 Jun 2005 18:56:51 -0400 > >can someone tell me how to approximate the effect of a snaredrum on an organ with no percussion (other than chimes)? it will basically accompany a piccolo-like melody.   Take out a large pipe and tape a piece of parchement paper over the hole leaving enough room for it to vibrate. Enjoy! heeheehee it worked in college!! snrk snrk   Scritchies and Haruffaroo-bahawow... Bruce and the Baskerbeagles   HowlingAcres http://www.baskerbeagles.com Natural products for pets & people http://www.naturalzone.biz  
(back) Subject: RE: AUSTIN ORGANS: TO BE OR NOT TO BE...(x post) From: "Michael David" <michaelandmaggy@comcast.net> Date: Thu, 30 Jun 2005 20:42:44 -0500   Did you call or write them directly?   Michael     -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of ScottFop@aol.com Sent: Thursday, June 30, 2005 8:04 PM To: pipechat@pipechat.org; piporg-l@listserv.albany.edu Subject: AUSTIN ORGANS: TO BE OR NOT TO BE...(x post)   Hi All I am directly inquiring about the Austin Organ Company because I am = hearing   so many conflicting reports. Is Austin open, or is Austin GOING to reopen, or not? In the past two weeks I have heard from many individuals in the organ = sales   world, including various builders, that they are open, then they aren't open, then they might open, then donors might be coming to the forefront, then the state of Connecticut is going to partially fund them, then there is a = very rich buyer in the wings, then there is no one, then they are closed permanently with no hope of reopening, etc etc etc. I have heard this = from organists, organ builders, organ techs, Austin reps and reps of other builders and many others as well. For God's sake- WHICH IS IT? Someone IN AUTHORITY from the Austin company or the Austin family needs = to make an official, indisputable and very public statement and stop all the =   rumors and speculation. Thank you. Scott F.Foppiano   In te Domine speravi, non confundar in aeternum.      
(back) Subject: Re: the instrument is not to be sampled without the builder's express consent From: "Gil Page" <kestrel6@earthlink.net> Date: Thu, 30 Jun 2005 21:59:32 -0400       Charlie Lester wrote:   > =3D-> ...there are some organbuilders (including some on this very List, =   > as I recall, who specify in the contracts that the instrument is not > to be sampled without the builder's express consent. <-=3D > > > Unless the builder paid for the organ, I really don't see how they > have any right to restrict sampling.   Since recording these days is exactly the same technical process as sampling, it would seem likely that this could never be upheld by a court.  
(back) Subject: Re: PipeChat Ministry/literature and ... um.. snaredrums From: "Paul Smith" <kipsmith@getgoin.net> Date: Thu, 30 Jun 2005 20:48:26 -0500   > There is so much wonderful > symbolism in organ literature, even some that was probably > not intended by the composer. Music is the universal > language and in "Pulling Out All the Stops" William Albright > call the organ the "Vox Delecti" (voice of God). Through > its beauty, demonstrated in the literature we play, > worshipers are often moved to deeper prayerful thought and > inspiration. The Spitit touches souls using language we do > not understand.... this is most likely one of them.   Unfortunately it is true that "real" music, the music preferred in church = by most of the listers (YOU know what I mean!) requires that some learning has gone on in our formitive years to be fully appreciated. Most of the folks who come into churches, even liturgical churches, these days have no =   background in the traditions of good Western European music. I suspect = that the same was true a century ago, but people then didn't mind trying to better themselves, and if they didn't understand something right away, = they would work at learning more about it. At least this was true of my grandparents and those of their generation whom I knew. Today we want everything handed to us, and if we are used to "contemporary easy rock" = and we are subjected to "easy contemporary rock" (if there is any such thing) = we turn it off. We want what we want and we want it NOW. Music education in = the schools has failed miserably for the last 50 years - for many reasons, I'm =   sure - but the result is that the "language" of classical music that I = grew up hearing, is fast dying out. Too bad. And too bad for our churches if we =   haven't been teaching our kids to sing good real stuff, instead of baby songs accompanied by a boom box. In my Methodist church, we are so completely at one with our culture, that there is no attempt to step up to =   anything better. In fact, just using such an expression would mark me as a =   snotty highbrow, and out of touch. So we compromise, inserting some better =   music under the radar, and grateful to the few who know and appreciate the =   good stuff - who speak the language.      
(back) Subject: mp3 repost: Kromolicki Etude #2 From: "Jonathan Orwig" <giwro@adelphia.net> Date: Thu, 30 Jun 2005 22:23:55 -0700   Hello, Friends   Josef Kromolicki wrote only a few organ pieces, but they are all interesting and challenging music. This example, his Concert Etude #2 is a whirlwind showpiece designed to show off the organist's technique.   ftp://diapason.dk/toccata/Kromolicki,%20Josef/KromolickiConcertEtude2Stacca= to.mp3 or *http://tinyurl.com/7otny   Enjoy, *   -- Jonathan Orwig Evensong Music, Media and Graphics New Organ and Choral Music http://www.evensongmusic.net    
(back) Subject: How would you rank "service" music publishers? From: "Desiree'" <nicemusica@yahoo.com> Date: Thu, 30 Jun 2005 23:20:08 -0700 (PDT)   Among publishers of music that is accessible and learned in a few days to = a week, how would you rank your favorite publishers? Mine: 1. MelBay/Kevin Mayhew. Tons of great collections with original music by = June Nixon, John Bertalo, Quentin Thomas, Malcolm Archer. Many fine hymn = preludes as well. Often can get a book of 80 or more pieces. These = collections are probably to organists today as the AMSCO and Lorenz = publication were in years back...very useful and always a good buy. (Im = only asuming organist way back then found those Everybody's Favorite books = of good use) 2. Morning Star Music--tons of really nice hymn arrangements 3. Augusburg--tons of nice stuff, and they now have the downloadable = music, which eliminates buying a book for $30.00 and only findind 3 = pieces per your liking. 4. Concordia---nice books, but are mostly hymn based 5. Harold Flammer/Shawnee Press--Also some very nice collections, but = woudl liek to see more new stuff. As I look back at old scores, it seems like original "Service" music = really did not become a big thing until the 50's or early 60's. I also = heard rumor of organist in NYC frequently playing the Ride of the = Walkeries for the Easter Postlude. (And a well known NYC Org-Chm told = that!)   __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around http://mail.yahoo.com