PipeChat Digest #5445 - Tuesday, July 5, 2005
 
Re: The Bronte Sisters (offtopic)
  by "Paul Opel" <popel@sover.net>
Hutchings 384
  by "Nathan Smith" <erzahler@sbcglobal.net>
Re:Standing Ovations... or the Blue Flame
  by <RMB10@aol.com>
Sampling Question
  by "Nathan Smith" <erzahler@sbcglobal.net>
RE: Standing Ovations... or the Blue Flame
  by "Will Light" <will.light@btinternet.com>
Re: Standing Ovations... or the Blue Flame
  by "Margo Dillard" <dillardm@airmail.net>
RE: Standing Ovations... or the Blue Flame
  by "Will Light" <will.light@btinternet.com>
Horowitz and the standing ovation
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
RE: Sitting Ovations
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Felix Reinburg, master voicer and finisher
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Re: Standing Ovations... or the Blue Flame
  by "Rev. Tony Newnham" <organist.tony@btinternet.com>
Re: Organ pipes are not waste
  by "John Vanderlee" <jovanderlee@vassar.edu>
CZECH ORGAN CULTURE - PART 3 - THE ROMANTIC YEARS
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Mother Goose Suite..was levity
  by "Desiree'" <nicemusica@yahoo.com>
Re: Mother Goose Suite..was levity
  by "Bernadette Wagner" <musicalgrl90@yahoo.com>
Theatre Organ Chat List?
  by <Gordongoede@aol.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: The Bronte Sisters (offtopic) From: "Paul Opel" <popel@sover.net> Date: Tue, 5 Jul 2005 05:53:36 -0500   From Ogden Nash-   Medusa 'twas began it- she wrote "Forever Granite.," One day, tossing away a petrified Argonaut on whom she'd chipped her = tooth, Medusa said to her sisters "Since we are three literary sisters, just like the Brontes, why can't we instead of being Gorgons, be Brontesauruses?   http://www.sover.net/~popel/agomain.html      
(back) Subject: Hutchings 384 From: "Nathan Smith" <erzahler@sbcglobal.net> Date: Tue, 5 Jul 2005 07:34:07 -0400   >>I'd like to do this. I can get the stoplist of Aeolian-Skinner 1066A,and know the single change made by Thompson-Allen; and I'll have the stoplist after Quimby's rebuilding. But where can I get the stoplist for the original George S. Hutchings, 1896, opus 384?<<   Hi there,   I am fairly certain that we have the Hutchings stoplist hanging around somewhere. I'll ask Joe and Nick when they are back in town within the next two weeks...   Best,   Nate    
(back) Subject: Re:Standing Ovations... or the Blue Flame From: <RMB10@aol.com> Date: Tue, 5 Jul 2005 07:43:37 EDT   Sand wrote: Standing ovations have become so conventional as be meaningless. The most =   satisfying feeling to me is what a former teacher called the "Blue Flame." =   There are times when a performer experiences a transcendental moment when = he or she merges with the music,the choir, soloist, or the instrument that = they are playing. When that occurs the audience will feel that is a magical moment .... silence is as appropriate as thunderous applause or a standing =   ovation.       Yes, yes, yes!!! Silence can be even more appropriate sometimes. = Thunderous applause and a croud jumping to its feet often ruins the moment. To me, = the crowd needs to feel the music and savor the moment. Music is mystical and =   spiritual, just as much as a church service is. While I think that = applause when directed to God as an expression of priase is appropriate at time, I don't =   think that it fits after the choir has offered some sort of meditative = anthem. The same holds true in a concert. If an organist has played something = along the lines of "Komm, Susser Tod" I would not want them to applaud, in fact = I would be mad if they did. I would want them to sit there and reflect for = a minute. I was rehearsing the Fox arrangement of this the other day at = church for an upcoming recital and a retired music teacher came in and listened--she = just stood there when it was over with her hands up in the air, then said after = a minute, (almost breathlessly) "oh, I just love the pipe organ, I love = Bach, and that piece is just wonderful..."   "The Lord is in His holy temple, let all the earth keep SILENCE before = Him." Sometimes silence is golden...   Monty  
(back) Subject: Sampling Question From: "Nathan Smith" <erzahler@sbcglobal.net> Date: Tue, 5 Jul 2005 07:50:30 -0400   >>Nobody owes anyone a living in this world.<<   Then get out the CD players!!!!   It's not about owing anyone a living, it's about not stealing work. Furthermore, even if a "digital" organ builder did sample the organ of an active company, they sure as heck couldn't say so. If someone sampled the Great First Diapason from an Apocalypse organ, and decided to place on the digital organ a nameplate that said "Great Diapason of an Apocalypse organ", the Apocalypse Organ Company would in turn sue the pants off of that digital company and win, for trademark infringement.   By the way, Apocalypse Organ Company is my fictitious organ company.   Best,   Nate    
(back) Subject: RE: Standing Ovations... or the Blue Flame From: "Will Light" <will.light@btinternet.com> Date: Tue, 5 Jul 2005 13:37:46 +0100   Quite right Bob - it doesn't happen here in the UK unless the performance truly warrants it. However, I have noticed that recently some people are attempting to devalue the ovation by copying the Americans, sometimes = after really mediocre performances - but sufficient people, including me, = usually remain resolutely in their seats - preferring to exercise our critical judgment!   Will Light Coventry UK   -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of = Bob Conway Sent: 05 July 2005 05:48 To: PipeChat Subject: Re: Standing Ovations... or the Blue Flame [BIG SNIP]   I believe that this is a North American thing, I haven't noticed it when I =   have been "back home" and attended concerts or recitals. The sooner it comes to an end, the better!   Bob Conway      
(back) Subject: Re: Standing Ovations... or the Blue Flame From: "Margo Dillard" <dillardm@airmail.net> Date: Tue, 5 Jul 2005 08:20:48 -0500   Yes - that silent pause at the end of the piece, as everyone in the room holds onto what has just happened - not wanting to break it with sound. I have experienced it on both sides of the applause. I have experienced it on a very few occasions in worship services also - where there is no applause - but there is that space after the last note when no one moves or rattles a bulletin. I've never heard it called a blue flame, but yes there is an almost electrical feeling in the room as everyone present "stops time" for a couple of seconds.   I direct a classical vocal ensemble at my church, and this once happened after one of their anthems. I asked them at their next rehearsal if they had noticed it. They all had, and the comment one made was "yea, it was weird". I told them this was the greatest compliment they could have gotten - much better than applause - it was a "connection" with the congregation that no one wanted to break.   It is rare and it is precious - and you never seem to forget those occasions, whether you were performing or listening. I think they come under the category of Maslow's "peak experiences".   Margo On Jul 4, 2005, at 11:22 PM, Sand Lawn wrote:   > Standing ovations have become so conventional as be meaningless. > The most satisfying feeling to me is what a former teacher called > the "Blue Flame." There are times when a performer experiences a > transcendental moment when he or she merges with the music,the > choir, soloist, or the instrument that they are playing. When that > occurs the audience will feel that is a magical moment ....   Dr. Margo Dillard Organist, First United Methodist Church, Lewisville, Texas Accompanist, Musical Feast Choral Society Dillard Piano and Organ Studio   "Strive to be the kind of person that your dog thinks you are"        
(back) Subject: RE: Standing Ovations... or the Blue Flame From: "Will Light" <will.light@btinternet.com> Date: Tue, 5 Jul 2005 14:50:35 +0100   The last time I experienced that awed silence was not in church or recital hall, but in a cinema at the end of "Schindler's List". The audience = simply filed out in total silence. Most moving!   Will Light Coventry UK      
(back) Subject: Horowitz and the standing ovation From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Tue, 5 Jul 2005 09:55:14 EDT   Horowitz could end a recital with a light scherzo, or end an important =   work pianissimo, and get a standing ovation. Sometimes it would erupt immediately, other times there would be a a brief pause while the audience = recovered from the experience, and then they went wild. It wasn't whether or not he ended with a big bang, it was that he = always made music. The type of reaction varied, depending upon the mood he set. Ever attend a gripping performance of the Mahler 9th, after which everybody is so moved that there is no applause?   Sebastian M. Gluck New York City  
(back) Subject: RE: Sitting Ovations From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Tue, 5 Jul 2005 07:03:34 -0700 (PDT)   Hello,   Now isn't the standing ovation a funny thing?   Here in the UK, People will remain sat on their hands after splendid performances, and yet many of the same people will rocket vertically when someone like Mrs.Thatcher ends even a mediocre speech.   Go to Holland, and they leap up for no particular reason, giving standing ovations to almost anyone who has the physical courage to climb up to an organ loft.   I'd thought of investing in one of those compressed-air horns, like they have at football matches, and a banner with the words Swell! and Great!   All I have to do now is find an organ-recital.....no easy thing these days.   Regards,   Colin MItchell UK     --- Will Light <will.light@btinternet.com> wrote:   > Quite right Bob - it doesn't happen here in the UK > unless the performance > truly warrants it.     ____________________________________________________ Yahoo! Sports Rekindle the Rivalries. Sign up for Fantasy Football http://football.fantasysports.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Felix Reinburg, master voicer and finisher From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Tue, 5 Jul 2005 10:37:00 EDT   Pipemakers such as Zimmermann, Rolin, and Mazur were certainly used by=20 quality organbuilders during the 19th century, Zimmermann being the best kno= wn=20 to Americans because pipework from the Zimmermann shop made its way into som= e=20 significant American organs. F=E9lix Reinburg, twin brother of Abbot Emile Reinburg, was actually bor= n=20 in Strasbourg, where so many Germans settled. Just as Cavaill=E9-Coll's fami= ly=20 had roots in Spain, national identities were mixed and created amazing cultu= ral=20 blends. Reinburg is responsible for the sound of many of the great=20 Cavaill=E9-Coll instruments.   Sebastian M. Gluck New York City http://www.glucknewyork.com/   ..  
(back) Subject: Re: Standing Ovations... or the Blue Flame From: "Rev. Tony Newnham" <organist.tony@btinternet.com> Date: Tue, 5 Jul 2005 15:44:37 +0100   Hi ----- Original Message ----- From: "Will Light" <will.light@btinternet.com> To: "'PipeChat'" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Tuesday, July 05, 2005 2:50 PM Subject: RE: Standing Ovations... or the Blue Flame     > The last time I experienced that awed silence was not in church or = recital > hall, but in a cinema at the end of "Schindler's List". The audience > simply > filed out in total silence. Most moving! > > Will Light > Coventry UK   Likewise - only it was after a Minister's preview of "the Passion of the Christ".   Too often at concerts, etc. recently, applause has started almost before = the last note has been released!   Every Blessing   Tony    
(back) Subject: Re: Organ pipes are not waste From: "John Vanderlee" <jovanderlee@vassar.edu> Date: Tue, 5 Jul 2005 10:50:54 -0400   > > In order to keep out the factors of sentimentality, historic >stewardship to authenticity, or other issues that would push the >decision beyond a simple practical and economic consideration, let's >say the pipe is from a mid 1950s Moller of somewhat less than >stellar personality or historic value. > Thank you for allowing me to ask this perhaps bizarre toss up >question, and happy holiday to all who read here. > Cheers > Mike Gettelman       Having a set of Wurlitzer strings smashed by the placement of loudspeaker cabinets on top of them, I too am curious about the economics of a possible repair.   John V  
(back) Subject: CZECH ORGAN CULTURE - PART 3 - THE ROMANTIC YEARS From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Tue, 5 Jul 2005 08:19:46 -0700 (PDT)     CZECH ORGANS AND ORGAN MUSIC (PART 3) - THE ROMANTIC YEARS   hello,   Barely had the 19th century got under way, and with it the beginnings of the industrial revolution, than Czech nationalism and demands for greater autonomy began to surface. The impetus came from the "Narodni obrozeni" or Czech National Revival movement; a liberal movement seeking autonomy and political change, yet subject to Austrian Habsburg rule. This brought them into fierce opposition to the more radical, anti-monarchical democrats, who wanted nothing else but the formation of an independent republic.   Although such conflicting interests are usually of a political or financial nature, in the Czech region it was more a cultural phenomenon, as people re-discovered the folk-lore, legends, language and roots of Czech origins. Unfortunately, what promised to be a successful summit in 1848, turned out to be anything but, due to an uprising which saw violence and barricades erected on the streets of Prague. Alarmed by this and acutely aware of revolution in France, the ruling Habsburg Monarchy in Austria declared martial law, and put down the rebellion easily.   By 1860, the Habsburgs re-convened the whole empire, and re-named it the Austro-Hungarian Empire; a fine thing if one happened to be a Hungarian, but not exactly to the liking of the now independently-minded Czechs. The Czechs may have been united in their dislike of the ruling Habsburg imperialists, but numerous splinter groups formed; weakening their effectiveness considerably. Consequently, the formation of an independent Czech state was not to happen, even though things would never be quite the same again.   The music of the Czech region reflected the re-discovery of Czech origins and heritage, and the evocative, "folksy" melodies of Smetana are well known enough not to require further elaboration here. Significantly, Smetana wrote six Preludes for Organ.   The start of Czech romantic music really started with Frantisek Skroup (1801 - 1862), but it is Smetana who is now most associated with the adoption of a unique Czech style of music, incorporating the tunes familiar to the Czech people. Initially concentrating on piano music, it was much later that Smetana wrote his wonderful tone poems, "Ma Vlast" (My country) which so inspired the Czech desire for independence, even though Smetana had spent much of his productive life in Sweden. Smetana died in 1884 in Prague.   The other, and possibly more famous composer in the Czech lands was Anton Dvorak (1841-1904), who studied at the "Prague organ school" (a name which really only means Music Academy). His numerous Symphonies and the wonderful "Slovanskych tancu" (Slavonic Dance - 1878), made him instantly famous, and clearly established the name Dvorak as one of the greatest composers of the romantic era.   Although early works, (written when Dvorak was but 18 years of age) the organ Preludes & Fugues are worthy of performance.   There are sound clips available of ALL the Dvorak and Smetana organ-works on the Naxos-BIS label, but they have proved troublesome and have not been included here. For those who may wish to persevere, the recordings are under the BIS record title and entitled Symphonic Organ Music; there being two CD sets to select from.   Of the rest, the list of Czech composers includes the names of Zdenek Fibich (1850 - 1900 ), Vilem Blodek (1834 - 1874) and Karel Bendl (1838 - 1897); none of whom wrote organ music so far as I am aware.   Less internationally well-known Czech composers DID write organ music and other works fortunately, and one of the earliest romantic composers for organ (perhaps writing for instruments which were not especially romantic) was Jakub Simon Jan Ryba (1765-1815) who also wrote a Christmas Mass popular in the Czech region. Perhaps not great music, it nevertheless personifies the development of romantic writing.   http://pes.internet.cz/hudba/ukazky/haz128b.ram   The Czech composer Josef Kli=E8ka (1855-1937) wrote a fine Fantasia on the Wenceslas Chorale ( Fantasie na Svatov=E1clavsk=FD chor=E1l) which demonstrates much broader romantic brush-strokes and vivid use of organ colour. Josef Kli=E8ka was to be an important influence on later organ composers in the Czech lands. Here is a sound clip of the opening of this work:-   http://www.scinstruments.com/JT/samples/128H_2.mp3 If the names of Smetana and Dvorak enjoy an ongoing international reputation, what do we make of the Czech composer Jan Vaclav Hugo Vorisek (1791-1825) ? Indeed, has anyone ever heard of him? A familiar name or not, this particular composer is often compared to Beethoven, and in his most celebrated masterpiece, the Symphony in D, immediately tantalises with the Beethoven-like quality of the writing:-.   http://www.cedillerecords.org/sounds/058_01.mp3 (1st movement)   http://www.hudba.cx/klasika/vorisek.mp3 (2nd movement)   http://www.cedillerecords.org/sounds/058_04.mp3 (3rd movement)   The Czech composer J. B. Foerster (1859-1951) is fairly well known outside the country of his birth. He bridges the gap between the full-bodied romanticism of Dvorak and Smetana, and the newer style which began to take shape in the first quarter of the 20th century. Typical of so many Czech people, Foester was multi-talented, as a writer, a man of the theatre, a composer of distinction and a painter....perhaps the Czech "Renaissance Man" with a vengeance. After spending time in Vienna and Hamburg, he returned to the Czech region in 1918. His musical influences included the works of Tchaikovsky, Grieg, Mahler, and impressionism. His musical language seems to be grounded in organ music and choral polyphony, but with increasingly modern harmonies as time went by. Foester wrote two organ works, as follows:-   Fantasy in C major, Op.14 Impromptu, Op.135   Unfortunately, I cannot provide music clips of these, but there is an intriguing setting of Psalm 57 for voice and organ:-   http://www.musicabona.com/samples/rd151-2_1_08.mp3     In other genres, Foester also excelled, and the following excerpt taken from a Piano Trio illustrates the wide compositional range of this fine composer:-   http://www.musicabona.com/samples/su3603-2_1_01.mp3   Primarily a lyricist, Foester reached his most celebrated success in choral music, particularly pieces composed for male choirs, for example: Polni cestou (On the Field Path), Hymnus, Svaty Vaclav - (St. Wenceslas). He also mastered the song form and the cantata (Stabat Mater). He composed 5 symphonies, 6 suites, many violin concertos, symphonic poems, 6 operas, melodramas, and numerous chamber and church pieces. There is a Foerster Society in Prague, who have promoted his works and paid tribute to his memory since 1919.   Two other composers are worthy of mention, who dip into the romantic era, and both of whom wrote organ-music.   Anton Plachy (1758-1836): Pastoral Prelude Jan Krtitel Kuchar (1751-1829):   Adagio in A flat major =95Andante in A minor =95Complete Organ Works =95Fantasia in D minor =95Fantasia in E minor =95Fantasy in G minor =95Fugue in A minor =95Largo in G minor =95Pastorale in C major =95Pastorale in C major =95Pastorale in D major =95Pastorale in G major =95Pastorela     That romantic Czech organ-music appears to be a poor relation to orchestral ,chamber and other instrumental music during the 19th century, may be connected with the fact that most organs merely served the function of plainsong or hymn accompaniment, and there was never a great wave of church-building and new organs. The extant older organs seldom ever had reed registers, (even in the Pedal organs), and in most smaller churches, this tradition continued and is still found to-day with some smaller new instruments. As a consequence, the organ was not the instrument of high-drama we associate with the romantic organs of France, Germany, Holland, England and elsewhere; with their fine reed choruses and expressive possibilities.   However, all this was to change in the years following the turn of the 19th and 20th centuries, possibly due to the fact that the Czech region had become a productive manufacturing economy, which would eventually rise to become the 10th richest country in the world. In the larger cultural centres such as Prague and Brno, some very large instruments were built.   In no particular order,the following links will demonstrate not only the changes, but the persistence of the older style right up to the present day. Make note of the dates!   http://varhanninastroje.euweb.cz/index2.php?odkaz=3D152&dispozice=3Dano&tit= le=3D=DA=9Atek%20(k%20sv.%20Petra%20a%20Pavla)     http://varhanninastroje.euweb.cz/index2.php?odkaz=3D149&dispozice=3Dano&tit= le=3D=DAjezd%20u%20Vala=9Ask=FDch%20Klobouk   http://varhanninastroje.euweb.cz/index2.php?odkaz=3D165&dispozice=3Dano&tit= le=3D=8Eamberk%20(k.%20sv.%20V=E1clava)   http://varhanninastroje.euweb.cz/index2.php?odkaz=3D160&dispozice=3Dano&tit= le=3DVrbno%20pod%20Pradedem%20(k.sv.Michaela)   http://varhanninastroje.euweb.cz/index2.php?odkaz=3D7&dispozice=3Dano&title= =3DBrno%20%20katedr=E1la%20sv.%20Petra%20a%20Pavla   http://varhanninastroje.euweb.cz/index2.php?odkaz=3D114&dispozice=3Dano&tit= le=3DPraha%20(k.%20sv.%20Jakuba%20Vet=9A=EDho)   Everything was now set for the organ to become a serious instrument in the Czech region, but the romantic period was drawing to a close, and the organ clearly had limited appeal to the main-stream Czech composers.   As we shall see, things sometimes take un-expected twists and turns of fortune. Who would ever have suspected, that as the 20th century unfolded, the Czech region would become the CSSR under the Russian communist "sphere of influence". The secular nature of communism could hardly have been the best environment for organists, organs and organ composers..... or could it?   As we shall see in Part 4, the history of Czech Organ Culture becomes ever more fascinating and diverse, and after a slow start, the 20th century witnessed a virtual explosion in the writing of organ-compositions: and this in a country which has more atheists per hectare than any other in Europe!!   However, let us end this part by hearing a sound-clip of the =93Postlude=94 from Janaceck=92s =93Glagolitic Mass;=94 written as the gathering storm-clouds of political change and war gathered across Europe and the world.   http://www.musicabona.com/samples/rd151-2_1_14.mp3     Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK         __________________________________ Yahoo! Mail Mobile Take Yahoo! Mail with you! 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(back) Subject: Mother Goose Suite..was levity From: "Desiree'" <nicemusica@yahoo.com> Date: Tue, 5 Jul 2005 08:22:36 -0700 (PDT)   Fot those who recall, The Mother Goose Suite was the composition that won the AGO Composition award at the last competition for that. While it is fun and does add levity to a recital, Bradley Welch mentioned iits being a fairly technical work. It is based on Mother Goose Rhymes A Narrator reads throughout the score while the organist plays.   The name of the composer escapes me at this time.   TDH   __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around http://mail.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Re: Mother Goose Suite..was levity From: "Bernadette Wagner" <musicalgrl90@yahoo.com> Date: Tue, 5 Jul 2005 08:54:45 -0700 (PDT)   It's Ravel, isn't it? I had to do "The Enchanted Garden" or "The Secret = Garden", or whatever type of garden it was as a duet at piano camp this = year. I have to say that it was really quite boring. The ending has big = glissandos and is quite "big", but that's kinda it. There are a bunch of = rolled chords in the middle of the piece, which adds "flair" I guess. I = don't know about the other movements of the suite, but this one wasn't my = cup of tea.   nicemusica@yahoo.com> wrote: Fot those who recall, The Mother Goose Suite = was the composition that won the AGO Composition award at the last competition for that. While it is fun and does add levity to a recital, Bradley Welch mentioned iits being a fairly technical work. It is based on Mother Goose Rhymes A Narrator reads throughout the score while the organist plays.   The name of the composer escapes me at this time.   TDH   __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around http://mail.yahoo.com   ****************************************************************** "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org List-Subscribe: List-Digest: List-Unsubscribe:           __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around http://mail.yahoo.com
(back) Subject: Theatre Organ Chat List? From: <Gordongoede@aol.com> Date: Tue, 5 Jul 2005 12:02:25 EDT   Dear Listers: Does anyone know if there is a chat list for Theatre Organs? And if so, how to is subscribe? TIA Gordon (In Fresno, California)