PipeChat Digest #5469 - Saturday, July 23, 2005
 
RE: Power surge
  by "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
Re: Power surge
  by "F. Richard Burt" <effarbee@verizon.net>
RE: Power surge
  by "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
dale's summer fun
  by <Keys4bach@aol.com>
RE: dale's summer fun
  by "Brent Johnson" <brentmj@charter.net>
Re: dale's summer fun
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net>
Re: dale's summer fun
  by <Keys4bach@aol.com>
Ott in River Forest, IL
  by "terry hicks" <Terrick@webtv.net>
Essays in Honor of Barbara Owen -- New Book & OHS Convention
  by "William T. Van Pelt" <bill@organsociety.org>
Re: Power surge--back on subject
  by "William Chapman" <wmgrantchapman@msn.com>
Organ Masterpieces from France and Germany
  by "Anthony Nichols" <ruffatti2003@yahoo.com>
digital pianos
  by "Dennis Steckley" <kzrev@casscomm.com>
Re: Power surge
  by "Jan Nijhuis" <nijhuis.jan@gmail.com>
re: Richard Morris recording(s)
  by <ProOrgo53@aol.com>
 

(back) Subject: RE: Power surge From: "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Fri, 22 Jul 2005 21:48:19 +1200   >Certainly students starting piano are better served by a good digital keyboard than by the typical old upright that we inherited from Grandma.   No way. The only way to get a kid interested in good music is to get them = a good instrument, and an electronic fake is not a good instrument. One of = the things I hate is when I see an advertisement like the following in a newspaper -   PIANO FOR SALE: Ideal for learner. Price $150.   If you get something with crappy tone, you teach the would-be student that the instrument (in this case a piano) has crappy tone. If you really want = to encourage a student, get piano with the finest tone that you can possibly afford. It's doesn't matter a damn what the thing looks like, or whether = it can be put in a cupboard or the back of the piano. That's completely irrelevant to teaching a kid about beauty in tone. And capturing a child's appreciation and understanding of fine tone is a fair way to making that child a musician that loves the instrument and its music.   The same thing with an organ. You don't get a Hammond to teach a kid to = play Bach on.   I've heard heaps and heaps of great big old heavy pianos "that we = inherited from Grandma" and I'd prefer them any day to an electronic substitute. I = was brought up on a huge old English "Collard & Collard". Sure, the case had been 'modernised', the touch was a bit too heavy, and the mid-range was = just average tonally, but the treble was very sweet and from about TenA down = the bass was to die for - rich, intense, majestic - quite thrilling in fact. I've never had any electronic keyboard/piano do that to me, however expensive.   With that, the piano occupied a place of importance in the living-room of the house and was always open, inviting anyone (especially us kids) = passing by to have a go. We did. If I had to get an electronic keyboard down from = a cupboard, I would never have done so.   Etc.etc.etc. End of rant.   Ross    
(back) Subject: Re: Power surge From: "F. Richard Burt" <effarbee@verizon.net> Date: Fri, 22 Jul 2005 06:04:43 -0500   Good Morning, Ross, et al: Somehow, Percey Grainger went wrong. Here was a man who went all over the world playing on all kinds of pianos, without complaining, and his music is still a breath of fresh air. Oh! ... I bet he probably did not have to "endure" the tone of an imitation piano. It was reported that he played all kinds of good music on all kinds of pianos, ...many of which were probably incapable of producing the kind of tone we would expect in public concerts. <impish grins> F. Richard Burt ..    
(back) Subject: RE: Power surge From: "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Fri, 22 Jul 2005 23:25:45 +1200   Somehow, Percy Grainger went wrong. Here was a man who went all over the world playing on all kinds of pianos, without complaining, and his music is still a breath of fresh air. >It was reported that he played all kinds of good music on all kinds of pianos, ...many of which were probably incapable of producing the kind of tone we would expect in public concerts. Wasn't he also an alcoholic boor? :-)   Ross   P.S. I like the bit in his Country Gardens piece where you are instructed = to hit the keys with your fist!      
(back) Subject: dale's summer fun From: <Keys4bach@aol.com> Date: Fri, 22 Jul 2005 09:58:06 EDT   Hi all, last Sunday i was in St Louis and played at my childhood church. It contains an intact and mostly working 1931 Aeolian. ( i was in college =   before i learned the cresc. pedal does NOT cancel with general cancel). = What fun i had. 44 ranks plus harp and chimes. 4 sets of celestes. 2 open wood 16's and a =   Violone. 10 reeds including the usual suspects, clarinet orchestral oboe, = french horn, English horn, clarion, trumpet, "organ"oboe, vox and a 16 Posaune = so smooth. Even has SW to Pd 2'! Played Dale Wood, the Bach If Thou But Suffer, a Bock arrangement of I = Love you Lord, as the church is HIGHLY blended, and Finale from Vierne's 1st. It is my hope that the rumors of interest from OHS are true. And unlike the convention, the building, a gothic monster seating 1200 has = AC. Hope you all have had at least one fun experience this summer like i did. Dale back in the swelter hoping the Austin still speaks........  
(back) Subject: RE: dale's summer fun From: "Brent Johnson" <brentmj@charter.net> Date: Fri, 22 Jul 2005 09:30:05 -0500   Dale, I got to hear this organ and get inside it a bit during an AGO crawl early one Saturday morning. It's a great instrument with a lot of wonderful colors in it. We were just told "It needs some work", but things inside looked in good condition. The console looked as if it had taken a bit of = a beating, but isn't that what they're for? :) You were lucky to get to = grow up listening to and playing that instrument.   Brent Johnson ORGANLive - Music of the organ on demand http://www.organlive.com     -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of Keys4bach@aol.com Sent: Friday, July 22, 2005 8:58 AM To: pipechat@pipechat.org Subject: dale's summer fun   Hi all, last Sunday i was in St Louis and played at my childhood church. It contains an intact and mostly working 1931 Aeolian. ( i was in college =   before i learned the cresc. pedal does NOT cancel with general cancel). What fun i had. 44 ranks plus harp and chimes. 4 sets of celestes. 2 open wood 16's and a =   Violone. 10 reeds including the usual suspects, clarinet orchestral oboe, french horn, English horn, clarion, trumpet, "organ"oboe, vox and a 16 Posaune = so   smooth. Even has SW to Pd 2'! Played Dale Wood, the Bach If Thou But Suffer, a Bock arrangement of I = Love   you Lord, as the church is HIGHLY blended, and Finale from Vierne's 1st. It is my hope that the rumors of interest from OHS are true. And unlike the convention, the building, a gothic monster seating 1200 has = AC. Hope you all have had at least one fun experience this summer like i did. Dale back in the swelter hoping the Austin still speaks........   ****************************************************************** "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org>  
(back) Subject: Re: dale's summer fun From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net> Date: Fri, 22 Jul 2005 09:33:40 -0500   The Aeolian at Memorial Presbyterian Church in St. Louis has just been awarded an OHS plaque and we are hoping to organize a special recital to present this later in the year. With the Duke University and Longwood Gardens Aeolians it is probably one of the three outstanding Aeolian = organs in existence, and it still has its original Aeolian console.   John Speller   ----- Original Message ----- From: <Keys4bach@aol.com> To: <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Friday, July 22, 2005 8:58 AM Subject: dale's summer fun     > Hi all, > > last Sunday i was in St Louis and played at my childhood church. > > It contains an intact and mostly working 1931 Aeolian. ( i was in = college > before i learned the cresc. pedal does NOT cancel with general cancel). What > fun i had. > > 44 ranks plus harp and chimes. 4 sets of celestes. 2 open wood 16's and = a > Violone. 10 reeds including the usual suspects, clarinet orchestral = oboe, french > horn, English horn, clarion, trumpet, "organ"oboe, vox and a 16 Posaune so > smooth. Even has SW to Pd 2'! > > Played Dale Wood, the Bach If Thou But Suffer, a Bock arrangement of I Love > you Lord, as the church is HIGHLY blended, and Finale from Vierne's 1st. > > It is my hope that the rumors of interest from OHS are true. > > And unlike the convention, the building, a gothic monster seating 1200 = has > AC. > > Hope you all have had at least one fun experience this summer like i = did.      
(back) Subject: Re: dale's summer fun From: <Keys4bach@aol.com> Date: Fri, 22 Jul 2005 10:51:54 EDT   WHAT Marvelous news!!!!!!!!!! I have considered that "my" organ since my first lesson on it when i was = 11 years old. the following Sunday night i played my first 3 hymns. Oh John, i trust this means it will be easier to keep it! It is a grand dame and this is just outstanding. dale now a little bit taller and happier in Florida  
(back) Subject: Ott in River Forest, IL From: "terry hicks" <Terrick@webtv.net> Date: Fri, 22 Jul 2005 11:58:26 -0700   There is a small portative instrument in their chapel which is probably the Paul Ott instrument.    
(back) Subject: Essays in Honor of Barbara Owen -- New Book & OHS Convention From: "William T. Van Pelt" <bill@organsociety.org> Date: Fri, 22 Jul 2005 17:07:58 -0400   Last Tuesday during the OHS Convention, the first copy of a brand new book published in honor of Barbara Owen was presented to her at the Annual Meeting. The book of 409 pages contains original essays on organ topics by fifteen scholars of the organ and has been kept a secret from Barbara = during the entirety of the two full years that were consumed in its writing and production. Barbara is one of the founders of OHS and has served as its President twice. The editors of the book are the late John Ogasapian, Scot Huntington, Len Levasseur, and N. Lee Orr.   Authors and their essays include:   ?John L. Speller: "Aspects of the Old English Transposing Organ" Nicholas Thistlethwaite: "Organs and Arminians in Seventeenth-Century Cambridge" Peter Williams: "Some Observations on Three Keyboard-Composers" Laurence Libin: "Johann Gabrahn's Organized Piano in Context" Susan Tattershall: "Oaxaca's Amazing Organ Culture" Lynn Edwards Butler: "Manual Designations as Registration Indicators" Uwe Pape: "Restoration of Tubular-Pneumatic Organs in Northern Germany" Stephen Bicknell: "The Bad Tempered Organ" John Ogasapian: "The Question of Eugene Thayer" N. Lee Orr: "Dudley Buck and the Coming of Age of the American Organ" Rollin Smith: "Early American Organ Recordings" Stephen L. Pinel: "Giles Beach and the American Church Organ Works" Dana J. Hull: "Organ Restoration Odyssey" Jonathan Ambrosino: "Winds of Change" Orpha Ochse: "Manuel Rosales and the Los Angeles Organ Renaissance"   The book is available from the OHS Catalogue at http://www.ohscatalog.org. It is currently the first item on the opening page.   Two hard bindings are available: the binding in library cloth is in stock for immediate delivery. A very small number of leather-bound, gilt-edge copies are being produced and almost all of them are subscribed. The remaining leather-bound copies are available at http://www.ohscatalog.org   OHS will enter its 50th year of existence in the Summer of 2006, and this book kicks off a number of other special publications being produced by = the OHS Press in celebration.   Bill    
(back) Subject: Re: Power surge--back on subject From: "William Chapman" <wmgrantchapman@msn.com> Date: Fri, 22 Jul 2005 20:16:50 -0400   For those interested in power surges here is a reprint from the Mike Holt website. This author also has his website listed at the bottom. For those = of you who are technically reclined--hit delete.   Grant Chapman     Basics of Surge and Transient Protection Part 1   In this multipart series we will cover surge and transient protection for all types of signal, control and power lines. My goal is to help the = reader understand the basic principles and be able to assess the capabilities of the types of protection available on the market today. One of the most important skills you should learn from this series is the ability to ask = the right questions and evaluate the answers received.   Some of the topics we will cover include:   The functioning of types of protective devices and their strengths and weaknesses. The impact that protective devices may have on the power, signal and = control circuits. The impact of structured wiring systems surge related damage to = electronics. Frequently made mistakes. Answers to questions presented in response to previous parts of the = series. Manufacturers' game of specsmanship. The most important part of this series is YOU. It is through your feedback =   that I can best understand your needs and can help you develop the tools = you need in this area.   Surges and transients are a fact of life in residential, commercial, and industrial electrical systems. The NEC recognizes this and provides some guidance on the connection of these devices. Surges and transients can = have a number of sources. These sources are both external and internal. = External sources include lightning, power system switching, faults, inductive loads =   and other causes. Internal sources include fluorescent lighting, inductive =   load switching (starting and stopping of motors especially) faults, = welding and other causes. To begin this series let us look first at the NEC requirements in Article 280 for surge arresters and then at Article 285 = for transient voltage surge suppressors (TVSSs).   Secondary surge arresters are those devices that are designed for = connection to the wiring system after the distribution transformer but prior to any overcurrent protection. These devices are normally at system phase to = ground voltages of less than 1kV. When used on circuits of less than 1 kV they = must be listed, rated for the available fault current and rated at or greater than the maximum continuous phase-to-ground power frequency voltage available at the point of application. Where used, the surge arrester is required to be connected to each ungrounded conductor. The grounding conductor for the arrester elements can be connected to one of four items:   Grounded service conductor. Grounding electrode conductor Grounding electrode for the service Equipment grounding terminal in the service equipment. Devices listed as surge arresters may also be connected on the load side = of the overcurrent protection. Some devices are listed as both surge = arresters and as transient voltage surge suppressors.   Silicon Carbide type surge arresters are also permitted by Article 280 on circuits at system phase to ground voltages of 1 kV or greater. We will = not discuss these higher voltage arresters at this time but may come back to them if there is sufficient interest in the feedback.   NEC article 285 governs the use of TVSSs permanently installed on premises =   wiring systems. In residential wiring systems such devices are normally wired into the service entrance equipment. In commercial or industrial locations, additional TVSSs may be installed at other locations such as branch panels to shunt both remnants of externally generated surges and internally generated surges back to their source. TVSSs are only permitted =   on circuits of 600 volts or less and on the load side of the overcurrent device. They must be listed, normally to UL-1449 version 2, and rated for the maximum continuous phase-to-ground power frequency voltage available = at the point of application and for the available fault current. TVSSs are = not permitted to be installed on ungrounded systems, impedance grounded = systems, or corner grounded delta systems unless they are specifically listed for = use on these systems. TVSSs are permitted between any two conductors - ungrounded conductor(s), grounded conductor, grounding conductor.   The NEC points out that the conductors used to connect the surge arrester = or TVSS to line or bus and to ground must be no longer than necessary and = avoid unnecessary bends. These conductors must be a minimum of #14 AWG copper or =   #12 AWG aluminum. Where bend radiuses, fill and clearances permit, a = larger wire size is preferable. Additionally, the NEC mandates that the grounding =   conductors must not be run in metal enclosures unless the conductor is bonded to both ends of the enclosure. This requirement ensures minimum inductance in the interconnection wiring.   In our next segments we will begin to look at how surges and transients = are generated, how they impact our facilities, basic operations of surge arresters and TVSSs and the individual components they employ. We will = also consider the impact of inductance on suppression operations.     Ed Roberts   Lightning and Transient Protection, Grounding, Bonding and Shielding Education www.efrobertsassoc.com Copyright =A9 2005 by E. F. Roberts and Assoc.   _________________________________________________________________ FREE pop-up blocking with the new MSN Toolbar =96 get it now! http://toolbar.msn.click-url.com/go/onm00200415ave/direct/01/    
(back) Subject: Organ Masterpieces from France and Germany From: "Anthony Nichols" <ruffatti2003@yahoo.com> Date: Fri, 22 Jul 2005 21:05:53 -0700 (PDT)     Hello,   Does anyone know where I can buy a copy of Organ Masterpieces from France = and Germany by Richard Morris? It's recorded on the Rodgers pipe organ at = Second Baptist Church Houston, TX. I've looked online every place I can = think of but have been unsuccessful. Any suggestions would be helpful.   Thanks,   Anthony Nichols   --------------------------------- Yahoo! Mail Stay connected, organized, and protected. Take the tour
(back) Subject: digital pianos From: "Dennis Steckley" <kzrev@casscomm.com> Date: Sat, 23 Jul 2005 00:28:43 -0500   Justin...you must not be playing the same digital pianos I've seen, heard, and played. The better ones are very fine, indeed, with a very lifelike touch and excellent sound. In fact, a good digital piano will probably sound better than the lower to medium price levels and brands of acoustic pianos. Dennis Steckley For I am possessed of a cat, surpassing in beauty, from whom I take occasion to bless Almighty God.  
(back) Subject: Re: Power surge From: "Jan Nijhuis" <nijhuis.jan@gmail.com> Date: Fri, 22 Jul 2005 22:30:33 -0700   On 7/22/05, Russ Greene <rggreene2@shaw.ca> wrote: > Digital keyboards were never intended as instruments for the budding > concert pianist nor as replacements for a Steinway concert grand. > Most pianists have spent their early years learning on an old upright > with an action vastly inferior to a good digital keyboard. The best > and worst keyboard actions I've experienced have been acoustic pianos.   Agreed, and I might add that the most consistant actions are on digitals. I certainly think that Yamaha has it right with their GH action. Not quite a finely regulated Renner, but quite convincing.   > > Digital keyboards are virtually useless for a student in > > developing > > manual technique. >=20 > Sorry, that's twaddle. The only time you are perhaps correct is for > an advanced student at the very upper levels of technique. Certainly > students starting piano are better served by a good digital keyboard > than by the typical old upright that we inherited from Grandma.   As for the acoustic ... I keep thinking of that drop-action spinet Hallet & Davis we had for a few months. Yeah, like you can develop technique on that. NOT!   > My goodness, I'm surprised to hear that. I've used digital keyboards > (and acoustic pianos) and digital organs (and pipe organs both > tracker and not) with human solo voices and small and large choirs. > They all work fine if the performer is competent. Any good digital is > certainly loud enough to support singing. It's intriguing that you > find them not loud enough or usually too loud - the correct setting > towards the middle of the volume slider has apparently escaped your > notice.   And occasionally you can drown out the bad singgers with a few hundred more watts, or move the volume control down low for accomanying a small child. (Or Wendy Makkena as Mary Robert before the "A with an attitude" adjustment in Sister Act)   > Russ Greene > ---------------------------------- > Organist/Choirmaster > St. Andrew's Anglican Church (Woodhaven) > Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada   --=20 Jan Nijhuis nijhuis.jan@gmail.com  
(back) Subject: re: Richard Morris recording(s) From: <ProOrgo53@aol.com> Date: Sat, 23 Jul 2005 02:01:59 EDT   _Google Search: Organ Masterpieces from France and Germany by Richard Morris_ (http://www.google.com/search?hl=3Den&ie=3DISO-8859-1&q=3DOrgan+Masterpiece= s+from+France+and+Germany+by+Richard+Morris&btnG=3DGoogle+Search)