PipeChat Digest #5382 - Wednesday, June 1, 2005
 
RE: 16' manual stops
  by "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
Re: learning only one page
  by <Justinhartz@aol.com>
Re: learning only one page
  by "Andy Lawrence" <lawrenceandy@gmail.com>
Re: learning only one page
  by "Andy Lawrence" <lawrenceandy@gmail.com>
Re: lawyer organists
  by <DarrylbytheSea@aol.com>
 

(back) Subject: RE: 16' manual stops From: "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Wed, 1 Jun 2005 16:58:47 +1200     The NZ builder George Croft used to build superb smallish-scale open wood Violones in the first half of the 20thC that were quite outstanding. His best was at St Paul's Anglican, Symonds St, Auckland, in the 1920s. The = 16ft Double Open on the Great on the IV/57 N&B from 1906 in Wellington is borrowed on the Pedal as the 16ft Violone and that is also wonderful, = though not as good as the wooden Croft which is one of my bestest favouritest = stops of any kind anywhere.   On the St James's Presby. organ by Tustin (ex N&B) in Newtown, Wellington, = a 2m of about 16 stops, there was a 16ft Gamba that was borrowed ion the Pedal. Sadly, in the rebuild and electrocution some years ago, it was no longer made available on the Swell.   Ross    
(back) Subject: Re: learning only one page From: <Justinhartz@aol.com> Date: Wed, 1 Jun 2005 03:09:10 EDT   There is no one way to learn a piece written for the organ. Each composition presents its own challenges. A good teacher will show you how to PRACTICE different passages of = music. A bad teacher will just correct the wrong notes (if, indeed, he or she =   can).   Cheers, Justin Hartz  
(back) Subject: Re: learning only one page From: "Andy Lawrence" <lawrenceandy@gmail.com> Date: Wed, 1 Jun 2005 00:59:54 -0700   On 6/1/05, Justinhartz@aol.com <Justinhartz@aol.com> wrote: > There is no one way to learn a piece written for the organ. > Each composition presents its own challenges. > A good teacher will show you how to PRACTICE different passages of > music. > A bad teacher will just correct the wrong notes (if, indeed, he or sh= e > can). > =20 > Cheers, > Justin Hartz  
(back) Subject: Re: learning only one page From: "Andy Lawrence" <lawrenceandy@gmail.com> Date: Wed, 1 Jun 2005 01:14:21 -0700   I have long felt that a private music lesson should usually be simply a teacher-attented/coached/directed/critiqued practice session.=20 Learning to practice is the key. But I haven't run into a teacher that does this yet (other than me, and I'm not a real teacher. I sometimes help adult pianists make the transition to get a good basic hymn-playing technique). The lesson is always a critiqued performance. I think this should only happen about 10% of the time. Andy     On 6/1/05, Andy Lawrence <lawrenceandy@gmail.com> wrote: > On 6/1/05, Justinhartz@aol.com <Justinhartz@aol.com> wrote: > > There is no one way to learn a piece written for the organ. > > Each composition presents its own challenges. > > A good teacher will show you how to PRACTICE different passages of > > music. > > A bad teacher will just correct the wrong notes (if, indeed, he or = she > > can). > > > > Cheers, > > Justin Hartz >  
(back) Subject: Re: lawyer organists From: <DarrylbytheSea@aol.com> Date: Wed, 1 Jun 2005 04:56:29 EDT   In a message dated 5/31/2005 6:22:13 PM Central Standard Time, nicemusica@yahoo.com writes:   The gent who was (and probably still is?) the national councillor for Professional Concerns in the last 2 years has a JD and a BAMus. He was = elected particularly for that reason, I think.     The "gent" is Jim Owen from Dayton. He's a great guy and a very valuable asset to the Guild. As a lawyer, his specialty is labor relations, and he = has been a bi-vocational church musician for many years. I was called about a rather sticky situation in another chapter and my = first comment was, "call Jim." They did, and the matter was resolved rather quickly. Yours, Darryl