PipeChat Digest #5387 - Thursday, June 2, 2005
 
Re: Ernest White Organ, Our Saviour, NYC
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Re: Which organ is more noteworthy?
  by <RMB10@aol.com>
Two FREE Pedal Stops in New York City
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Re: Lemare Organ Works/Transcriptions
  by "John Vanderlee" <jovanderlee@vassar.edu>
Re: WHICH?? RE: White NYC organ is more noteworthy of the two?
  by "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net>
Everett Nourse' new CD - fund raiser for Memorial Carillon
  by <Wuxuzusu@aol.com>
Lemare Andantino in D-flat
  by "Daniel Hancock" <dhancock@brpae.com>
Douglas Bruce recital, Our Savior's, Milwaukee (xpost)
  by "John Seboldt" <rohrwerk@seboldt.net>
Ross's ideal small organ
  by "Daniel Hancock" <dhancock@brpae.com>
Re: Bach Erbarm dich
  by "John Seboldt" <rohrwerk@seboldt.net>
St. Mary the Virgin
  by "Kenneth Potter" <swell_shades@yahoo.com>
Re: Lemare Andantino in D-flat
  by "Rev. Tony Newnham" <organist.tony@btinternet.com>
Re: two modestly-sized Mollers
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Re: Which organ is more noteworthy?
  by "Desiree'" <nicemusica@yahoo.com>
Large organs for big American Churches
  by "Daniel Hancock" <dhancock@brpae.com>
Re: Lemare Andantino in D-flat
  by <BlueeyedBear@aol.com>
Lemare in current repertory
  by "Robert Lind" <lindr@core.com>
Re: two modestly-sized Mollers
  by "jch" <opus1100@catoe.org>
Re: Which church is more noteworthy
  by <RMB10@aol.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Ernest White Organ, Our Saviour, NYC From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Thu, 2 Jun 2005 07:59:12 EDT   This organ, never successful, had been modified, and will be replaced by a =   Schantz.   Sebastian M. Gluck New York City  
(back) Subject: Re: Which organ is more noteworthy? From: <RMB10@aol.com> Date: Thu, 2 Jun 2005 08:00:00 EDT   Desi- Will you be writing a thesis about the changing styles of Harrison's work from his early concepts of tonal design to his later years? If so, you = would have some choice instruments to choose from in and around the NYC metro = area. Would you be performing recitals on some of these instruments as part of = your thesis? Sounds like it would be a lot of fun.   Monty Bennett  
(back) Subject: Two FREE Pedal Stops in New York City From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Thu, 2 Jun 2005 08:06:22 EDT   Available for the taking:   16' Open Wood, 32 pipes, large scale 16' Bourdon/8' Flute Unit, 44 pipes   Pick up midtown-east Manhattan by taker. Serious takers please email me or =   call 917-749-0827 and leave contact information if I do not answer.   There will be other pipework for sale, as well as some possible free = parts, later in the week.   Sebastian M. Gluck  
(back) Subject: Re: Lemare Organ Works/Transcriptions From: "John Vanderlee" <jovanderlee@vassar.edu> Date: Thu, 2 Jun 2005 08:24:52 -0700   > The original title is "Andantino in D-flat". > Lemare composed this song without words in 1888 and the original = version >sold over one million copies. > In 1921 Ben Black and Neil Moret added lyrics turning one of the >Victorian era's most popular organ solos into the popular song >"Moonlight and Roses" > The form of the original organ composition is AABA Coda. The second >statement of the A theme features a thumbed down counter melody played on = a 4' >flute, and the reprise features the theme played on the Vox Humana. > In the song version, the B theme became the verse, and the A theme = the >chorus. > In the selfless self promotion department you can hear me play the >original Lemare Andantino on the CD "HARTZ AND FLOWERS - Justin >Hartz Plays the >Organ at Longwood Gardens". For this performance I played from an >original 1888 >score following Lemare's original phrasing and registrations, and = replicated >Lemare's rubato (as heard on his recording for the Victor Talking Machine >Company). > Support a fellow organist - order a copy from OHS, Zarex/Pro Organo, = or >Longwood Gardens! > >Cheers, > >Justin Hartz   I have the copy already Justin!   John --  
(back) Subject: Re: WHICH?? RE: White NYC organ is more noteworthy of the two? From: "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net> Date: Thu, 2 Jun 2005 09:16:05 -0400   Well, I puzzled for a time over that WHITE Organ bit, the mind taking me over to St. George's Stuyvesant Square and its Moller, for which, I think, =   we owe "thanks" to Ernest White. I was at Biggsy's dedication recital, = along with most of New York, the curiosity factor hard at work. I can't honestly =   recall what the collective thinking, including my own, was about this instrument at the time. As a young student, I believed many strange = things! I was there a couple of years ago with some curiosity seekers from = overseas, and found the poor dear thing hard as nails. Biggs was intrigued enough = with the Organ that he made a recording of Romantic Organ Music on it, kind of unheard of for him. He did it very well indeed, and I think it sold well. = I wish I could now find my own LP. I have gradually been turning the LPs = over to Hip for morphing into CDs, and passing the Vinyl on to a choir member = who listens only to LPs and will gladly take them. I would certainly want to preserve that historic recording.   Dear Desiree, I say only in love that, while you have brought many = delights to the list, you have not yet even placed in the annual Pipechat Spelling Bee, so I quickly looked around for an alternative and found WHICH. A bit = of a stretch, but it fit. When I was teaching in a Canadian university, I = often had students who spelled "creatively" read what they had written out loud, =   and the incredulous looks on their faces were always a delight.   Cheers,   Malcolm Wechsler www.mander-organs.com   ----- Original Message ----- From: "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Wednesday, June 01, 2005 10:14 PM Subject: WHICH?? RE: White NYC organ is more noteworthy of the two?     > Shouldn't that be "WHICH NYC Organ is more noteworthy of the two?" I > don't know of any "White" organs unless you might be referring to > something that Ernest White designed. And i dont' know how many of > Ernest's organs are still around. > > David >      
(back) Subject: Everett Nourse' new CD - fund raiser for Memorial Carillon From: <Wuxuzusu@aol.com> Date: Thu, 2 Jun 2005 09:23:13 EDT   Greetings all,   Many of you know of Everett Nourse's music at organ conventions and/or at the Fox San Francisco Theater. Now Everett's daughter, Jeanne, has produced a CD from Everett's personal collection of Fox masters. These have never been released before.     Jeanne states in the CD liner notes, "A few years before his death, he=20 called me to say he'd been listening to some of the early Fox recordings an= d was=20 amazed by their vibrancy and beauty. Knowing him to be an extremely humble=20 man, I was surprised to hear him wax so eloquently about his own playing. T= hen=20 he said, 'I played with such lushness and fire, I must have been really=20 feeling in love.' "   They are available as a gift for donations of $50 or more to the Everett Nourse Memorial Carillon Fund at the Trinity Baptist Church, Vacaville, CA, where he was organist for over 25 years.   If you would like one of these gift CDs, send your name and address along with your check payable to =E2=80=9CTrinity Baptist Church=E2=80=9D and wri= tten request for=20 the CD, to the Everett Nourse Memorial Fund, c/o Jeanne Nourse, P.O.Box 429= ,=20 Vineburg, CA 95487. Contributions are tax deductible (minus $6).   Please direct any questions to Jeanne Nourse (707) 996-3808 <jenilu@vom.com= >   The recordings were made between 1956-1957 on 10 1/2", 15 IPS reels of tape= ..=20   "The Early Years At The Fox" Vol. 1   Song list: 1. A Little Bit Independent 2. My Shawl 3. Spring, Beautiful Spring 4. Josephine 5. Pretty Baby 6. Is It True What they Say About Dixie? 7. You Were Meant For Me 8. I Love You 9. Black And Blue Rag 10. Tip Toe Through The Tulips 11. Up A Lazy River 12. Were You Sincere? 13 We Just Couldn't Say Goodbye 14. Sweetheart Medley 15. You Tell Me Your Dream 16. I Only Have Eyes For You 17. Whispering 18. When Did You Leave Heaven? 19 Moon Over Manakoora 20. At Sundown 21. Louise 22. One Kiss 23 You Turned The Tables On Me 24. Sleepy Time Gal 25. Blue Moon 26. The Lady's In Love With You 27. Wild Tango 28. Tales From The Vienna Woods   Musically, Stan Krider    
(back) Subject: Lemare Andantino in D-flat From: "Daniel Hancock" <dhancock@brpae.com> Date: Thu, 2 Jun 2005 08:24:32 -0500   Thank you to all of you who assisted me in finding the name and sources for this "popular" piece by Lemare.   Incidentally, does anyone on list play Lemare now?   Daniel Hancock Springfield, Missouri  
(back) Subject: Douglas Bruce recital, Our Savior's, Milwaukee (xpost) From: "John Seboldt" <rohrwerk@seboldt.net> Date: Thu, 02 Jun 2005 08:45:52 -0500   Douglas Bruce will be featured in a program at Our Savior's Lutheran,=20 Milwaukee, WI, on Friday June 17, 7 pm. Full info is at   http://65.31.162.44/ezpublish/index.php/homesite/news/douglas_bruce_recital   Quick program summary:   March in G Major (Henry Smart)   Pieces for the standing clock in C=F6then Castle (J.S. Bach)   Sonata No. 2 (Mendelssohn   Clock pieces by Handel and Haydn   Variations on "Immortal, Invisible" (Hans Uwe Hielscher)   Toccata and Fugue in d/D, op 59/5-6 (Reger)   Allegretto in E-flat (William Wolstenholme)   Pi=E8ce H=E9ro=EFque (Franck)   Aria (Noel Rawsthorne)   Allegro Brillante (Vincenzo Petrali)   -----------   Those clock pieces by Bach are something I've never encountered -=20 something new every day... not to speak of some of the other less-heard=20 gems. Should be fun!   John Seboldt Interim Organist, Our Savior's Lutheran, Milwaukee, WI www.seboldt.net/annunciation www.seboldt.net/choralevensong Re  
(back) Subject: Ross's ideal small organ From: "Daniel Hancock" <dhancock@brpae.com> Date: Thu, 2 Jun 2005 08:45:34 -0500   A small handful of colourful warm flutes, perhaps a Dulciana and a mutation, and a bright harmonically-rich Principal chorus of perhaps 8 4 2 & IIrk Mixture, is really what's needed. Fine if you can add a Trumpet as well, and a Pedal of some use, but anything else in most places is just frills these=20 days.   Interesting, I think, Ross. Out of curiosity, what pitches would you advocate in the two-rank Mixture? Twelfth and Nineteenth? Or Nineteenth and Twenty-Second?   I assume this organ is primarily for service-playing. If so, what would you advocate in the ideal small organ for playing repertoire?   Daniel Hancock Springfield, Missouri  
(back) Subject: Re: Bach Erbarm dich From: "John Seboldt" <rohrwerk@seboldt.net> Date: Thu, 02 Jun 2005 08:53:35 -0500   Stephen Williams wrote: > Wading through the Bach works always coughs up a few interesting > observations and questions. Here's one that may be helpful to others who > play or teach the piece from this edition: Erbarm dich mein, o Herre = Gott, > BWV 721, Barenreiter, Vol 3, p 28, m 11, beat 2, first 8th, tenor note > (assuming a 3 and/or 4-part 8th note accompaniment); G-natural or = F-sharp? > Thanks. > Stephen   I think the bigger question is whether the NBA's indication "manualiter" for this piece is questionable or not. I have personally gravitated toward doing it this way, with a nice 16-8-4 manual foundation registration, but this was kind of a subjective "I like it that way" response. What set this sonic interpretation in place for me was the preparation for the 100th anniversary program of the Schuelke organ in New Vienna, Iowa - the combination of the NBA's "manualiter" heading with a trial on the organ's Great principals just made sense at that moment. This piece is one of those little gems that just tugs at you, profound but simple, whether it's actually Bach or not!   My recording is at http://www.seboldt.net/annunciation/organperformance.html if you want to hear what I mean.   John Seboldt Milwaukee, WI www.seboldt.net/annunciation      
(back) Subject: St. Mary the Virgin From: "Kenneth Potter" <swell_shades@yahoo.com> Date: Thu, 2 Jun 2005 07:19:54 -0700 (PDT)   A number of comments have been made in the last couple of days about St. Mary the Virgin, some of which are just not accurate. I sang in the choir back in my student days, and being the organ nerd I was, I did a lot of exploring etc.   The choir organ at the front right side of the church is from the original water motor powered Jardine organ. It was one of the very first electric action remote divisions in the country. The Jardine organ was removed from the rear gallery a long time ago, but only the pipes were removed from the choir organ. The old Jardine chest is still there and many people claim it could be made viable again with new pipework and new wiring. It's a large chamber. That was certainly Kyler Brown's plan at the time of the Trupiano rebuild. They installed the newly rebuilt console in the chancel where it was intended to stay. During that time the choir sang from the front. However, the rebuilding of the old Jardine choir organ never happened. No-one there was really happy to have the choir down front, so at great expense, that mammoth console was hoisted back up to the gallery where it remains. At that time a three manual Holtkamp type console was installed in the chancel to be used for services and accompaniment whenever needed. The organ had just been returned to the gallery at the time of the AGO convention in New York. and the choir sang with a Rodgers substitute for an event there.   The 32' euphone that someone mentioned came from a big auditorium organ out in (I think I recall) Michigan. I think it was after Harrison's time. It was a wonderful stop that sounded like a B-2 bomber coming at you. I may never have hearder a louder 32' stop in my life except for perhaps Notre Dame in Paris. Larry Trupiano removed it and replaced it with a more useable Bombarde with wooden resonators and a softer stopped 32. The euphone could never be used except for final cadences of big pieces. Hoisting that euphone out of there must have been impressive to watch. I miss it for it's extreme effect. It was said at the time that the gallery couldn't support the new 32's and the euphone too.   When I sang there the church acquired the old Aeolian Skinner from Trinity College in Hartford, Conn. That organ was built by G. Donald Harrison right around the same time as the St. Mary's organ and had a similar specification. It had just been torn out in favor of a new Austin, which, like St. Mary's sat caseless for many years til it got it's facade. The thought at the time was that St. Mary's could restore their organ, reversing a lot of the Ernest White (ca. 1942) changes, using the pipework from the Trinity Organ. I don't think they ended up using much of it in the rebuild, and they sold off ranks from the Trinity organ for years. The trinity organ was piled all over the church in every available cranny, with the console and the big 32' stuff in the room where they had coffee hour.   I'm not aware of an organ in the basement ever, but there was a largeish practice instrument up on either the second or third floor. I never heard it, so I have no idea what it sounded like. I can't really mention here what WAS found in the basement, that being more suitable for another list....................   Shortly after I left there, the organ had fallen into very sad state at the hands of one of New York's most disreputable organ maintainers best known for his muscles and tight t-shirts with the pack of cigarettes rolled into the sleeve. Several landmark instruments were laid low by that guy. I think in the case of St. Mary's he contracted to releather divisions and merely releathered the notes that had gone bad, with the organ going south shortly after he left. A friend of mine went in with a colleague to examine the organ with an eye to doing the needed repair work and found half-eaten sandwiches inside the swell division. Fortunately the guy seems to have disappeared from the local scene. That has to be one of the scarier organs to climb up into anywhere with two straight ladders going up the wall a huge distance. I was offered the chance to climb up once by an associate there, but chickened out. I remember turning pages for a friend who played some recitals there and having to hold certain stop knobs in because they would pop out at random, and being ready to shove the pedal in if it started slipping out of place.   Mostly I remember slouching down out of sight during the sermons there and then crawling out of the choir loft to go across the street to the White Tower for burgers or donuts. I always loved the dramatic look of the exposed organ. I once saw a sketch of the facade as it was to have been built - kind of similar to St. Patricks - but I think it's fortunate it was never built. The organ is certainly dramatic looking as it stands.   A powerful memory was walking out of a rehearsal there and finding people in 46th Street crying. I was to learn that Martin Luther King, Jr. had just been killed while we were practicing.   Best,   ken  
(back) Subject: Re: Lemare Andantino in D-flat From: "Rev. Tony Newnham" <organist.tony@btinternet.com> Date: Thu, 2 Jun 2005 15:31:40 +0100   Hi   I've played the Andantino a few times in lighter concerts. I've got a couple of other arrangements by him in my music collection, but I've not = had time to learn them yet.   Every Blessing   Tony (New list member) ----- Original Message ----- From: "Daniel Hancock" <dhancock@brpae.com> To: <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Thursday, June 02, 2005 2:24 PM Subject: Lemare Andantino in D-flat     Thank you to all of you who assisted me in finding the name and sources for this "popular" piece by Lemare.   Incidentally, does anyone on list play Lemare now?   Daniel Hancock Springfield, Missouri   ****************************************************************** "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org>      
(back) Subject: Re: two modestly-sized Mollers From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Thu, 2 Jun 2005 10:36:50 EDT   Dear Listers:   Having just spent several excruciating hours with one of the last and = worst Moller organs ever built, I can say that a small organ depends totally = upon the period and the folks who designed, scaled, voiced, and tonally finished = the organ. The organ in question was a 13-ranker from 1991, so vulgar, strident, harsh, coarse, uneven and unwieldy in its design as to be unbearable. = Misspelled stop names did not lend credibility to the designer. The instrument was cheaply built, and violated most of the fundamentals of good pipe organ = building. A tragic waste of funds. However, I also recently saw and played a FIVE-rank Moller that was several decades older, and it was warm, musical adaptable, emotionally = evocative, and far more elegant. It came off as a musical instrument, not a = noise-making machine. The larger 1991 instrument is the type of thing that forces many people to purchase disposable, artificial products. Oddly, though, this = church may have no other point of reference, and think that what they have is a great =   organ. I questioned myself as to whether or not this was a matter of taste, = and came to the conclusion that it was not. Brutal, ugly, deafening sound, = coupled with bad tonal design and a complete lack of tonal finishing, in an organ that is a technical nightmare are not matters of aesthetics.   Sebastian M. Gluck New York City http://www.glucknewyork.com/   ..  
(back) Subject: Re: Which organ is more noteworthy? From: "Desiree'" <nicemusica@yahoo.com> Date: Thu, 2 Jun 2005 07:43:35 -0700 (PDT)   I just wanted to see which was more noteworthy among the New Yorkers. The = stoplist of the Smocky Mary organ looks like it may be more fun than the = St Pauls organ. But The St Paul organ as one listed said in a different = wayn said, is what GDH intended it to be. TDH   RMB10@aol.com wrote: Desi- Will you be writing a thesis about the changing styles of Harrison's work from his early concepts of tonal design to his later years? If so, you = would have some choice instruments to choose from in and around the NYC metro = area. Would you be performing recitals on some of these instruments as part of = your thesis? Sounds like it would be a lot of fun.   Monty Bennett   ****************************************************************** "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org List-Subscribe: List-Digest: List-Unsubscribe:     __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around http://mail.yahoo.com
(back) Subject: Large organs for big American Churches From: "Daniel Hancock" <dhancock@brpae.com> Date: Thu, 2 Jun 2005 09:52:23 -0500   >Despite correspondence on this List and in other places, I still just >cannot >see any need whatever for a 4 or 5 manual job of 80 to 120 stops in a >church >seating perhaps 600 to 1000. Three manuals and 50 to 60 stops is still a >very large number.=20   Well, Ross, I can't say I wish it weren't so. Personally, I don't think that - all things being ideal - there's ever a need for such a large instrument, either. I mean, after a certain point, what else can you add that's nothing more than a duplicate of previously existing stops and divisions?   I do think it has to do with the large, awkward, non-traditional volumes that are being built to house large church congregations these days. Acoustically, they are not traditional (nor on many other levels, either), and time-honored rules of organ design and placement do not always work in them.=20   And I can't say that I am an advocate for those large instruments that try to combine divisions that represent every school and period of organ building in the history of the world. You know, an English Romantic Swell, and a French Baroque Recit - all coexisting together with nine other manual divisions in the same instrument. I like a coherent, well-rounded instrument whose parts function well alone, and add up to a perfect whole.=20   That's NOT to say that I think an organ ought to be constructed as a period piece. I do think it's entirely appropriate to take lessons from all organ-building schools and periods. And probably, any organ designed today ought not to exactly emulate any of them, but be it's own thing, unless we're looking for something that can play Franck and other French Romantic works perfectly - in which case, recreate Cavaille-Coll. (I think the most successful organ builders in the past have been the ones who didn't copy or amalgamate successful historic organs, but learned from them, and plowed new ground.)   Here in Springfield, Missouri, I can contrast a 65-rank Austin from 1979 with four manual divisions and pedal to a 23-rank Casavant from 2005 of two manual divisions and pedal. The Austin resides in a 1930's academic-Gothic Presbyterian Church Sanctuary which seats perhaps 300 - tight. The room is acoustically dead, and the entire organ is buried in chambers. The Casavant is in a volumetrically large Catholic Cathedral that seats 400, and sits in a more or less open case (divided, on either side of the choir loft). The Casavant - apart from being absolutely stunning in it's voicing and tonal finishing, fills its room far better than the Austin. Apart from having to figure out how to play repertoire for three-manual instruments on it, its really a more exciting recital instrument.   Yes, it can be exciting to "have more to choose from" in a larger instrument, but when the individual stop voice is mediocre, and the tonal finishing minimal or non-existent, it's not really that exciting. But when you have a well-designed organ (really, large or small) it's terribly exciting to see how each stop works on it's own and in relation to others. As an architect, I'm fascinated with small, efficient, and well-designed spaces. I'll always be impressed with large historic mansions and tall new sky-scrapers, but I suppose it's much the same for me as an organist.   But when you get to the large fan-shaped "worshiptoriums" that are seemingly prevalent here in the U.S., it gets rather more difficult to deal with acoustics - if there are any. But that's not to say it hasn't been done.   My original point was - and forgive me for straying - these large instruments are not always so much necessitated by ego and "keeping up with the Joneses" and greedy organists (although sometimes all of these play a part!) as they are by large rooms that are hard to fill with sound.   Daniel Hancock Springfield, Missouri  
(back) Subject: Re: Lemare Andantino in D-flat From: <BlueeyedBear@aol.com> Date: Thu, 2 Jun 2005 10:59:59 EDT   In a message dated 6/2/05 6:25:04 AM Pacific Daylight Time, dhancock@brpae.com writes:   > Incidentally, does anyone on list play Lemare now? >   i still play his transcription of humperdinck's prelude to hansel & = gretel.   scot  
(back) Subject: Lemare in current repertory From: "Robert Lind" <lindr@core.com> Date: Thu, 2 Jun 2005 10:02:42 -0500   I usually look for strong, closing voluntary pieces from Lemare. Over the last years I've played Marche Moderne and Marche Solennelle, among others. = I have a number of things waiting for me to learn. Perhaps the best of these is his Toccata and Fugue, Op. 98.   Bob Lind   ----- Original Message ----- From: Daniel Hancock <dhancock@brpae.com> To: <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Thursday, June 02, 2005 8:24 AM Subject: Lemare Andantino in D-flat     > Incidentally, does anyone on list play Lemare now?    
(back) Subject: Re: two modestly-sized Mollers From: "jch" <opus1100@catoe.org> Date: Thu, 02 Jun 2005 10:04:30 -0500   At 09:36 AM 6/2/05, you wrote: >The organ in question was a 13-ranker from 1991, so vulgar, strident, >harsh, coarse, uneven and unwieldy in its design as to be unbearable. >Misspelled >stop names did not lend credibility to the designer. The instrument was >cheaply built, and violated most of the fundamentals of good pipe organ >building. A >tragic waste of funds.   A recent poster tried to blame the demise of Moller on their labor union. = I would suggest the above comments on a latter day Moller attests to the real reason. I worked on many Mollers from the twenties and early thirties which were very fine sounding instruments. Some time after WW2 Moller took the wrong turn in their quest for staying competitive.   Jon      
(back) Subject: Re: Which church is more noteworthy From: <RMB10@aol.com> Date: Thu, 2 Jun 2005 11:29:19 EDT   What about some of the churches in the outlying areas or even the other boroughs?   Plymouth Church of the Pilgrims in Brooklyn has a large 4 manual Aeolian-Skinner organ but I have not heard it. I think it has been = recorded.   I know that there have to be some others in CT and NJ as well as in Westchester County, NY and out on Long Island that we don't hear about. = You should do some research into those as well because some of the less famous ones are really gems, too.   Monty Bennett