PipeChat Digest #5391 - Sunday, June 5, 2005
 
Jared Grenz is this week's star performer on organs and organists online
  by "John Foss" <harkat@kat.forthnet.gr>
flowerpot organs
  by "John Foss" <harkat@kat.forthnet.gr>
Hydraulis (was Re: flowerpot organs)
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net>
favorite small American-built organs
  by "Randy Terry" <randy_terry@hotmail.com>
fav. small American organs
  by "GB" <gblack@ocslink.com>
RE: flowerpot organs
  by "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
Richard Proulx
  by "Stephen Best" <stevebest@usadatanet.net>
New Oxford Health Commercial (OT, not spam)
  by "N. Russotto" <ravenrockdesigns@gmail.com>
Re: fav. small American organs
  by "Andy Lawrence" <lawrenceandy@gmail.com>
Re: FREE 8' Diapason in New York City
  by "Andy Lawrence" <lawrenceandy@gmail.com>
Re: fav. small American organs
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net>
Re: fav. small American organs
  by "Andy Lawrence" <lawrenceandy@gmail.com>
Re: Composer's Intentions
  by <SWF12262@aol.com>
RE: fav. small American organs
  by "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
 

(back) Subject: Jared Grenz is this week's star performer on organs and organists online From: "John Foss" <harkat@kat.forthnet.gr> Date: Sat, 4 Jun 2005 11:58:13 +0300   In keeping with our policy of featuring established recitalists and young organists, "star of the day" today is 15 year old Jared Grenz, playing the =   "piccolo" trumpet in John Stanley's Trumpet Tune in D, accompanied by dad = on the III/40 Holtkamp Organ in the 1st Congregational United Church of = Christ, Eau Claire, WI. Jared is also organ soloist in the "Ricercar in F sharp minor" by Johann Pachelbel on the II/26 1889/2003 Steere & Turner/Bedient Organ in the 1st Presbyterian Church, Chippewa Falls.   A lot of "behind the scenes" work has been accomplished - the members area =   has been re-designed and looks very elegant. it is also easier to use. I think all the files are now available again. The categorisation by = composer is complete, that by organist is still in progress. To give you some idea =   of the work involved, there are 51 recordings of works by J S Bach alone.   I have had several applications for membership which have come in blank. This may be due to a server problem - so I have taken to replying with Yahoo, which seems to be the most reliable. If you receive a message from = me from my Yahoo account, all I really need is a reply with your name, = username and password of choice - though there are other optional extras. If you = have tried to join and are wondering what has happened - and have got the patience (!) - please contact me on harfo32@yahoo.co.uk   Don't forget the News and Events section. If any members of the list have recitals they would like to include please let me know. We are developing this section by venue, date and recitalist. We are also including links to =   to the UK recital site - http://www.londonorgan.co.uk/ as it includes a comprehensive list of forthcoming London events, and also to the worldwide =   recital data base http://www.organfocus.com/ which can be searched by keywords, venue, date and organist. I looked through Google to see what impact the inclusion of files on the list has on the ratings. Despite the relatively short time the site has = been on line (not yet a full year) all the contributors I glanced at were on = the first page in the first ten entries. Ranking is to a certain extent a factor of time, but also volume. Quite by =   chance I was helping one of my students create his own web site last week and I asked him what he should include on it. Music, of course, and Greek food! Which was his choice of recipe? Well - what Greek dish would you choose? He, in common with about half the people I asked, chose Moussaka. So - next step - where do you find a recipe? Well, you're sitting at a computer, so Google seems as good a place as any.... and lo and behold, = out of 160,000 entries, at poll position is Alexandra Tsakiridou writing in = the English Times of Katerini, an online site written by my students. This was =   the first edition to go on line back in 1997, so longevity is part of the key to reaching the top! http://pieria.spark.net.gr/etimes/ I highly recommend Alexandra's recipe!   We had 3,691 visitors in May who between them visited 25,166 pages and resulted in 191,864 hits so keep coming!   John Foss http://www.organsandorganistsonline.com/ http://launch.groups.yahoo.com/group/orgofftop/      
(back) Subject: flowerpot organs From: "John Foss" <harkat@kat.forthnet.gr> Date: Sat, 4 Jun 2005 15:05:28 +0300   If my memory serves me correctly, there was a "model" organ manufactured = by Henry Willis & Sons about 40 years ago which was sort of "flowerpot" = shaped, with unenclosed pipes on a circular soundboard. I think it was a three = rank extension organ with direct electric action. Perhaps David Wyld can = confirm this. There used to be a picture of it in their advertisement in The Organ =   and The Musical Opinion. It looked a bit like the reconstructed Hyrdaulis which we have here in the museum of Dion - arguably the world's first = organ! http://www.culture.gr/2/23/232/epked/en/00_standard_menu/00a_ydraulis/00a.h= tm   John Foss http://www.organsandorganistsonline.com/ http://launch.groups.yahoo.com/group/orgofftop/      
(back) Subject: Hydraulis (was Re: flowerpot organs) From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net> Date: Sat, 4 Jun 2005 07:52:45 -0500   There is a video of the Dion hydraulis at http://www.archaeologychannel.org/content/video/hydraulis_56kW.html   My daughter Molly recently made a working model of a hydraulis with five copper pipes for her ancient inventions class project at Smith College. = She made and voiced the pipes herself out of half-inch copper pipe. She constructed the winding system out of 1/4" plexiglass so that it is = possible to see it operating with the water inside. The winding system is a little undersized for the instrument, with the result that there is only enough wind to play one pipe at time, but otherwise the instrument works very = well and presents a neat appearance. The whole thing is about three feet high and took up quite a bit of room in our Dodge minivan coming back for the summer with all the rest of our daughters' stuff from Northampton. = Anyway, now I am probably the only Pipechat member with a working hydraulis in the basement!   John Speller   ----- Original Message ----- From: "John Foss" <harkat@kat.forthnet.gr> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Saturday, June 04, 2005 7:05 AM Subject: flowerpot organs     > the reconstructed Hyrdaulis > which we have here in the museum of Dion - arguably the world's first organ! > http://www.culture.gr/2/23/232/epked/en/00_standard_menu/00a_ydraulis/00a.h= tm      
(back) Subject: favorite small American-built organs From: "Randy Terry" <randy_terry@hotmail.com> Date: Sat, 04 Jun 2005 10:24:59 -0700   I've shared a couple of my favorite smaller American-built organs. Does anyone else have a favorite electric-action instrument from the 50's or = 60's that they can share.   The organ I took my first lessons on is a 1958 Austin in First = Presbyterian in Florence, AL. I remember when I first encountered it how quick and responsive I thought the action was (I did not realize the factors that = made the Klann relays at my church so slow, or even that that particular action =   WAS slow until I played the Austin.   That organ was fully enclosed in the back gallery, and the worst thing = about it was the metal grill coverings rattled with the low notes. The organ chambers were higher than the ceiling, but there is a tone chute in the antebellum building and the organ sounds very successfully downstairs.   It is only 18 ranks, but the great chorus with 4' coupler is excellent, = and the English reeds are thrilling. Needless to say, no lack of umph in the pedal. The Dolce, which is almost inaudible, is the only useless stop. I was informed that there was a reason for the inculsion of the Dolce - they =   wanted something to back the choir up in a-capella works and for children soloists.   Of course, this is another instrument that is mainly a "church" organ, but = I played my sophomore profiency here - as the Wicks at the college had no working combination action, and I played the Franck Piece Heroique, Bruhns = G Major Preludium, and the Near Tryptich of Fugues, and all was at least somewhat authentic as far as registrations.   Randy Terry   GREAT:   8' Diapason 8' Bourdon (metal) 8' Gemshorn 8' Dolce 4' Octave 4' Quintaten III Mixture 2' Tremolo (fan)   SWELL:   8' Hohlflute 8' Viola 8' Viola Celeste 4' Spitzflute 2-2/3' Nazard 2' Blockflute 8' Trumpet 4' Hautboy Chimes Tremolo (fan)   PEDAL:   16' Diapason (wood, gt ext) 16' Gemshorn (gt ext, bottom 5 haskell) 16' Gedeckt (sw ext) 8' Principal (independent) 8' Gemshorn (gt) 8' Gedeckt (sw) 4' Fifteenth (ext) 4' Gedeckt (sw) 16' Trumpet (sw ext)   _________________________________________________________________ Express yourself instantly with MSN Messenger! Download today - it's FREE! =   http://messenger.msn.click-url.com/go/onm00200471ave/direct/01/    
(back) Subject: fav. small American organs From: "GB" <gblack@ocslink.com> Date: Sat, 4 Jun 2005 13:09:22 -0500   HI Randy and list, I play a 1946 Wicks unit organ of 5 ranks for church most every Sunday. Dia. 8, stopped flute 8, viola 8, dulciana 8 and = trumpet 8. Eventhough it is really not my favorite small organ; however, I can always depend on the action to work. I have been playing this small organ since 1977 and have never had one note cipher, or a magnet to repair. = Yes, a new rectifier this past week, but mechanically this little beast will go on and on for a long time I am sure. I would sooner have this than speakers any day. My 2 cents worth. Gary    
(back) Subject: RE: flowerpot organs From: "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Sun, 5 Jun 2005 07:17:55 +1200     >If my memory serves me correctly, there was a "model" organ manufactured = by   Henry Willis & Sons about 40 years ago which was sort of "flowerpot" = shaped,   with unenclosed pipes on a circular soundboard. I think it was a three = rank extension organ with direct electric action.   I believe it was in fact just one rank unified to 8 4 & 2, beginning as a stopped flute but the upper octaves in open metal and more Principal in tone. I have a photo somewhere but it'd take t wks to find it.   Ross    
(back) Subject: Richard Proulx From: "Stephen Best" <stevebest@usadatanet.net> Date: Sat, 04 Jun 2005 15:59:25 -0400   Hi everyone,   One of my organ students is writing a dictionary of sacred music for Scarecrow Press and has been unable to find a birth date for Richard Proulx. The year is easy to find -- the exact date is elusive. Anyone have that information?   Steve Best in Utica, NY    
(back) Subject: New Oxford Health Commercial (OT, not spam) From: "N. Russotto" <ravenrockdesigns@gmail.com> Date: Sat, 4 Jun 2005 19:46:41 -0400   Hello, all   Theres a new Oxford health Commercial out with and organ piece in the background! I dont even mean a snip, I mean through the whole commercial. I believe that it was Bach's Passacaglia and Fugue in C, but don't quote me, as I did not hear it too well.     NFR --=20 Nicholas F. Russotto Somers, Connecticut Organist, Holy Cross PNCC Enfield, Connecticut Moderator/Owner: Monarch of Music=20 http://launch.groups.yahoo.com/group/monarch_of_music/  
(back) Subject: Re: fav. small American organs From: "Andy Lawrence" <lawrenceandy@gmail.com> Date: Sat, 4 Jun 2005 22:40:58 -0400   So far, all my favorite small organs have been old and one-manual, the best of all being the Grafton, VT William Nutting organ from 1860ish.=20 No organ, large or small, has affected my opinion of what an organ should be more than this one. (I know I've said that before... I'll prolly say it again). ;) The reason is that a fairly complete chorus of some kind becomes possible even with a just a few stops. I believe the ideal small organ would be the same thing, but with everything duplexed to manual and pedal (obviously it wouldn't be a tracker anymore, though I suppose you could do the either/or thing to good effect), with one dedicated pedal stop, maybe a 16, 8 unit or even 16, 8, 4 unit.   The Nutting stoplist is something like this:   --Diapasons at 8', 4', 2 2/3, 2, 1 3/5 (yep, a diapason cornet, sounds AWESOME and FULL in a small-medium sized church with just a smidge of accoustic. Basically sounds like a normal principal chorus, with a touch of reed. --Flutes at 8' and 4'. I think its a bourdon and chimney or something like that. --8' Dulciana (or was it a string?) --16' pedal Bourdon.   It led with dignity and style a packed church in the "star-spangled banner" sung very loudly (it was a Grafton 250th evening celebration). Its fully enclosed, and so would also lead a choir nicely.   Take the same sets of pipes and duplex them over two manuals and pedal, extend the pedal rank to give the pedal some independence and there's little music you couldn't at least fake. Extend the 4' flute to 2' maybe if you insist. Add a trumpet 16', 8', 4' unit, and there's nothing you couldn't fake, and quite a bit that you wouldn't have to. Oh, except maybe the slush, but add one undulant to go with the Bourdon and/or string, and you've got that too. So I guess we're up to maybe 13 or 14 ranks to do everything... hymns, choir, and literature. No, no, not accurately I know. But musically. (I know... some of you are saying "must have mixture". Lemme tell ya, this organ don't need no stinking mixture).   Andy     On 6/4/05, GB <gblack@ocslink.com> wrote: > HI Randy and list, I play a 1946 Wicks unit organ of 5 ranks for church > most every Sunday. Dia. 8, stopped flute 8, viola 8, dulciana 8 and trump= et > 8. Eventhough it is really not my favorite small organ; however, I can > always depend on the action to work. I have been playing this small organ > since 1977 and have never had one note cipher, or a magnet to repair. Ye= s, > a new rectifier this past week, but mechanically this little beast will g= o > on and on for a long time I am sure. > I would sooner have this than speakers any day. My 2 cents worth. Gary >=20 >  
(back) Subject: Re: FREE 8' Diapason in New York City From: "Andy Lawrence" <lawrenceandy@gmail.com> Date: Sat, 4 Jun 2005 23:04:07 -0400   Sorry, already got one of those. But please PLEASE (anyone) if you know of a large scale, 4' Octave that could go with such a diapason please let me know. Actually, even a somewhat normal scale would be great.   I play a small organ that was originally all fat 8' stops. In the seventies someone decided to add skinny upperwork to it. Awful awful!   So... 4' octave please! (4,2 unit even better!)   Andy     On 6/3/05, TubaMagna@aol.com <TubaMagna@aol.com> wrote: > Once again, the organ bargains are staggering: >=20 > 8' Open Diapason, zinc and Hoyt's metal. > Anti-tank device scale. > Free for the taking. >=20 > We cannot ship these, as we have run out of the extra-large padded envelo= pes, > and the crew gets stomach aches if they lick that many stamps. Pick up in > Manhattan. >=20 > This is a $30,000.00 value, according to rumor, so why not take advantage= of > it? Would make a lovely Pedal stop for a big organ, or a thoughtful Bar > Mitzvah present for a loved one. >=20 > Sebastian M. Gluck > (917) 749-0827, or email >  
(back) Subject: Re: fav. small American organs From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net> Date: Sat, 4 Jun 2005 22:07:15 -0500   This is where the new OHS database proves so useful ...   See http://organsociety.bsc.edu/stoplists/VT/VT.Grafton.3967.TXT   John Speller   ----- Original Message ----- From: "Andy Lawrence" <lawrenceandy@gmail.com> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Saturday, June 04, 2005 9:40 PM Subject: Re: fav. small American organs     So far, all my favorite small organs have been old and one-manual, the best of all being the Grafton, VT William Nutting organ from 1860ish. No organ, large or small, has affected my opinion of what an organ should be more than this one. (I know I've said that before... I'll prolly say it again). ;) The reason is that a fairly complete chorus of some kind becomes possible even with a just a few stops. I believe the ideal small organ would be the same thing, but with everything duplexed to manual and pedal (obviously it wouldn't be a tracker anymore, though I suppose you could do the either/or thing to good effect), with one dedicated pedal stop, maybe a 16, 8 unit or even 16, 8, 4 unit.   The Nutting stoplist is something like this:   --Diapasons at 8', 4', 2 2/3, 2, 1 3/5 (yep, a diapason cornet, sounds AWESOME and FULL in a small-medium sized church with just a smidge of accoustic. Basically sounds like a normal principal chorus, with a touch of reed. --Flutes at 8' and 4'. I think its a bourdon and chimney or something like that. --8' Dulciana (or was it a string?) --16' pedal Bourdon.   It led with dignity and style a packed church in the "star-spangled banner" sung very loudly (it was a Grafton 250th evening celebration). Its fully enclosed, and so would also lead a choir nicely.   Take the same sets of pipes and duplex them over two manuals and pedal, extend the pedal rank to give the pedal some independence and there's little music you couldn't at least fake. Extend the 4' flute to 2' maybe if you insist. Add a trumpet 16', 8', 4' unit, and there's nothing you couldn't fake, and quite a bit that you wouldn't have to. Oh, except maybe the slush, but add one undulant to go with the Bourdon and/or string, and you've got that too. So I guess we're up to maybe 13 or 14 ranks to do everything... hymns, choir, and literature. No, no, not accurately I know. But musically. (I know... some of you are saying "must have mixture". Lemme tell ya, this organ don't need no stinking mixture).        
(back) Subject: Re: fav. small American organs From: "Andy Lawrence" <lawrenceandy@gmail.com> Date: Sat, 4 Jun 2005 23:34:14 -0400   Cool! I'm pretty sure the 4' flute is full compass though, not TC as listed. The TC should be with the Dulciana Cornet (which is not how the stop is engraved, btw, but perhaps is the original engraving) and perhaps the twelfth... don't remember.   On 6/4/05, John L. Speller <jlspeller@swbell.net> wrote: > This is where the new OHS database proves so useful ... >=20 > See http://organsociety.bsc.edu/stoplists/VT/VT.Grafton.3967.TXT >=20 > John Speller >=20 > ----- Original Message -----  
(back) Subject: Re: Composer's Intentions From: <SWF12262@aol.com> Date: Sun, 5 Jun 2005 01:14:00 EDT     Dear Pipechatters, I would submit that comparing historically accurate performance with the day-to-day reality many of us face is like comparing oranges and = orangutans. We are blessed to live in a time when we can easily access performances = or recordings of performances that are meticulously researched and played = either on the original instruments for which the pieces were written, or extant instruments that are their contemporary. The artistic and educational = benefits of this are enormous. However, one must ask how far we must go in our attempts at historical accuracy. I suppose one extreme would state that JSB's music should only = be played on mechanical action instruments with specifications and pipe = scaling identical to the instruments Bach played, complete with slider chests and = hand (or foot treadle) blowing. How many of us have this sort of instrument = readily available -- not to mention a "blowist" to fill the chests? Supposing = such a north German baroque instrument was ours to enjoy, should we be playing Franck or Willan on it? I think the point I want to stress is all = attempts at historical accuracy involve trade-offs and compromises. No one = instrument can possibly recreate all of the literature in an historically accurate = manner. Another point we need to remember is however well researched an interpretation of one of Bach's preludes and fugues might be, for = instance, we can't know for sure how the piece sounded when he or one of his contemporaries = played it. Descriptions of a performance are not recordings of the live event! = We are reading about the performance through the "filter" of the writer -- = his perceptions, prejudices, preferences, etc. Historic performance is a = best guess scenario. I certainly lean more towards E. Power Biggs' interpretations of Bach than = Virgil Fox's, but who's to say that JSB might not have preferred some = aspects of the latter? Both interpretations might be very musical, but very different. We cannot know which developments in voicing and technology = (e.g. combination actions, expressive divisions) might prove attractive to JSB. Once a piece is written, it exists and takes on a life of its own, in many = cases far outliving its creator. Every time a piece is played it is recreated, reinterpreted -- no two live performances of a piece are = identical! When I write, I try very hard to add as little interpretive or editorial = material as possible. I want the pieces I've written to take on lives of their = own, as they must if they survive. We should surely learn as much as possible = about performance practice for every piece we play, as well as the historical, social, and cultural milieu in which it was written. This should inform = but not dominate our interpretations. Part of the magic of what we do as organists specifically, and as = musicians in general is even when we play a piece for the 738th time, it is a new creation! Just my 2 cents' worth ($1.98, adjusted for inflation ;)) Steve Steven Weyand Folkers Director of Music St. Lambert RC Church Skokie, IL USA      
(back) Subject: RE: fav. small American organs From: "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Sun, 5 Jun 2005 18:31:04 +1200   >So far, all my favorite small organs have been old and one-manual, the best of all being the Grafton, VT William Nutting organ from 1860ish. No organ, large or small, has affected my opinion of what an organ should be more than this one   I know the feeling. In the Mornington Methodist here in Dunedin, NZ, there is an 1874 J.W.Walker tracker (of England) that I stopped from being = broken up way back in the early 1960s. Apart from the pedals being electrified = and a standard pedalboard replacing the old grotty one, nothing has been = altered at all. The OpDiap and Bourdon are unenclosed, the rest enclosed enclosed. All manual stops on the one slider chest.   8 Open Diapason] 8 Stopped Diapason 8 Dulciana (bottom 8ve grooved) 4 Principal 4 Flute 2 Fifteenth . Mixture III   16 Bourdon.   It's a stunning little instrument and is recognised for the gem that it = is.   Ross