PipeChat Digest #5393 - Tuesday, June 7, 2005
 
Solemn Evensong at St. John's
  by <DERREINETOR@aol.com>
BEMF Concerts at St. John's
  by <DERREINETOR@aol.com>
Re: fav. small American organs
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net>
Re: fav. small American organs
  by "Rev. Tony Newnham" <organist.tony@btinternet.com>
Re: fav. small American organs
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
Re: fav. small American organs
  by "Rev. Tony Newnham" <organist.tony@btinternet.com>
organ consultants and pricing
  by "Randy Terry" <randy@peacham.homeip.net>
Re: celestes that aren't meant to be
  by <Justinhartz@aol.com>
Re: fav. small American organs
  by <Justinhartz@aol.com>
Pipechat IRC tonight
  by "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca>
Complete ranks for sale, NYC
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
PD reprints
  by "Jonathan Orwig" <giwro@adelphia.net>
OHS 50th Annual Convention
  by "Administrator" <admin@pipechat.org>
National Cathedral plans...
  by "Randy Terry" <randy@peacham.homeip.net>
Poem about a visit to WNC on tuning day
  by "Randy Terry" <randy@peacham.homeip.net>
 

(back) Subject: Solemn Evensong at St. John's From: <DERREINETOR@aol.com> Date: Mon, 6 Jun 2005 09:46:22 EDT   Dear List,   If you are in the Boston area, please join us for Solemn Evensong at the Church of St. John the Evangelist, 35 Bowdoin Street, Boston, this Friday, = June 10th at 7:30pm. The guest preacher will be Rosaria Salerno, Clerk of the = City of Boston with the Rev. Dr. James D. Curtis, officiating; musical offerings = by the St. John's Schola Cantorum with the Choir of Dignity, Boston, under = the direction of yours truly.   Music is as follows:   Prelude, Fugue and Ciaccona -- Buxtehude Hymn: Praise, my soul, the God of Heaven (Lauda anima) Psalmody: plainchant Magnificat -- Eduardo Torres Nunc dimittis -- Vincente Ripolles Hymn: The day thou gavest (St. Clement) Anthem: "Lift up your heads, O ye gates" -- William G. Harris (yours = truly) Hymn: Praise to the Lord, the Almighty (Lobe den Herren) Festival Voluntary -- Flor Peeters     Hope to see a few of you there!   Pax, Bill H Organist and Choirmaster, SJE, Boston        
(back) Subject: BEMF Concerts at St. John's From: <DERREINETOR@aol.com> Date: Mon, 6 Jun 2005 09:52:05 EDT   Dear List,   The Church of St. John the Evangelist, 35 Bowdoin St., Boston, MA, will be =   hosting 9 "Fringe" Concerts during the Boston Early Music Festival (June = 12-18). Among these concerts is a very interesting programme of Bach harpsichord works presented by Sonia Lee of the University of Illinois. If you will be = in the Boston area during the Festival, I would encourage you to attend.   A full list of "Fringe" Concerts can be had at bemf.org. Look for the "fringe" page, then come visit us!   Pax, Bill H. SJE Boston  
(back) Subject: Re: fav. small American organs From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net> Date: Mon, 6 Jun 2005 09:13:21 -0500   Registration in eighteenth-century and early nineteenth-century England = was viewed in a very orchestral way. For example, trumpet voluntaries were almost invariably in the key or C or D, did not modulate (except by going onto another stop such as the Flute) and rarely even used accidentals -- = so as to do nothing that wasn't manageable on the valveless orchestral = trumpets of the day. Flutes were viewed mainly as solo stops played at 4 ft. pitch (generally without an 8 ft. stop being on as well), and so having a Tenor = C or even a Middle C Flute would not have been a great inconvenience. Using = 8 and 4 ft. flutes together for accompanimental purposes is a later practice imported from France and Germany.   John Speller   ----- Original Message ----- From: "Rev. Tony Newnham" <organist.tony@btinternet.com> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Monday, June 06, 2005 3:10 AM Subject: Re: fav. small American organs     > Hi > > A TC 4ft flute seems to be quite common on small British organs of the = mid > to late 19th/early 20th Century (unless it's the only 4ft). Principal, and > if present 15th are almost invariably full compass, as is Stopped = Diapason > (sometimes with a Clarabella or Open Flute treble range. Open Diapasons > often also stopped at TC. > > Source - observation, plus entering many surveys on the National Pipe Organ > Register. (www.bios.org.uk/npor) > > Every Blessing > > Tony > ----- Original Message ----- > From: "Andy Lawrence" <lawrenceandy@gmail.com> > To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> > Sent: Sunday, June 05, 2005 9:11 PM > Subject: Re: fav. small American organs > > > Ok, I'd certainly trust Ed's stoplist better than my memory :) A > short-compass 4' flute does seem odd, though, huh?      
(back) Subject: Re: fav. small American organs From: "Rev. Tony Newnham" <organist.tony@btinternet.com> Date: Mon, 6 Jun 2005 15:27:49 +0100   Hi John   I agree with what you say, but that doesn't explain the inclusion of TC flutes on single manual organs!   Every Blessing   Tony ----- Original Message ----- From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Monday, June 06, 2005 3:13 PM Subject: Re: fav. small American organs     > Registration in eighteenth-century and early nineteenth-century England > was > viewed in a very orchestral way. For example, trumpet voluntaries were > almost invariably in the key or C or D, did not modulate (except by = going > onto another stop such as the Flute) and rarely even used accidentals -- = > so > as to do nothing that wasn't manageable on the valveless orchestral > trumpets > of the day. Flutes were viewed mainly as solo stops played at 4 ft. = pitch > (generally without an 8 ft. stop being on as well), and so having a = Tenor > C > or even a Middle C Flute would not have been a great inconvenience. = Using > 8 > and 4 ft. flutes together for accompanimental purposes is a later = practice > imported from France and Germany. > > John Speller > > ----- Original Message ----- > From: "Rev. Tony Newnham" <organist.tony@btinternet.com> > To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> > Sent: Monday, June 06, 2005 3:10 AM > Subject: Re: fav. small American organs > > >> Hi >> >> A TC 4ft flute seems to be quite common on small British organs of the >> mid >> to late 19th/early 20th Century (unless it's the only 4ft). Principal, > and >> if present 15th are almost invariably full compass, as is Stopped >> Diapason >> (sometimes with a Clarabella or Open Flute treble range. Open = Diapasons >> often also stopped at TC. >> >> Source - observation, plus entering many surveys on the National Pipe > Organ >> Register. (www.bios.org.uk/npor) >> >> Every Blessing >> >> Tony >> ----- Original Message ----- >> From: "Andy Lawrence" <lawrenceandy@gmail.com> >> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> >> Sent: Sunday, June 05, 2005 9:11 PM >> Subject: Re: fav. small American organs >> >> >> Ok, I'd certainly trust Ed's stoplist better than my memory :) A >> short-compass 4' flute does seem odd, though, huh? > > > > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> > >    
(back) Subject: Re: fav. small American organs From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Mon, 6 Jun 2005 12:48:33 EDT   Dear Tony:   I have really been confused why an organ builder on a small instrument would have two stops for a stopped flute 8' breaking at TC or a 4' flute beginning at TC with no bass pipes for the stop. There were several continental builders who put whole half stops divided at MC for variety even on large instruments on a secondary manual or two. This makes more sense. Was the former to save space on the sound board or to assist the one footed organist who might pull the manual to pedal coupler? It's strange to me that Oboe 8' was often placed as a 49 pipe rank at TC. or that the Diapason 8' was a TC stop with only a stopped bass available. Some builders even went so far as to make the bass 17 notes CC to D# dividing at D#- E and beginning the rest of the 8' stops at T E. To me this would make a organ sound with very little gravity in the bass.   Ron Severin    
(back) Subject: Re: fav. small American organs From: "Rev. Tony Newnham" <organist.tony@btinternet.com> Date: Mon, 6 Jun 2005 18:13:46 +0100   Hi Ron   Apart from the space and cost issue, I've no explanation either - it's a fact of life! Divided stops are a great help on a small organ - = especially a single manual, as you can do a melody and accompaniment (it even works = if only the 8ft is divided - just draw the treble end and play the accompaniment down an octave - it usually needs a bit of fudging, but it does work. (But having been used, at various times, to playing reed = organs with divided stops, I'm used to it)   Every Blessing   Tony ----- Original Message ----- From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> To: <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Monday, June 06, 2005 5:48 PM Subject: Re: fav. small American organs     > Dear Tony: > > I have really been confused why an organ builder on a small > instrument would have two stops for a stopped flute 8' breaking > at TC or a 4' flute beginning at TC with no bass pipes for the stop. > There were several continental builders who put whole half stops > divided at MC for variety even on large instruments on a secondary > manual or two. This makes more sense. Was the former to save > space on the sound board or to assist the one footed organist > who might pull the manual to pedal coupler? It's strange to > me that Oboe 8' was often placed as a 49 pipe rank at TC. or > that the Diapason 8' was a TC stop with only a stopped bass > available. Some builders even went so far as to make the > bass 17 notes CC to D# dividing at D#- E and beginning the > rest of the 8' stops at T E. To me this would make a organ sound > with very little gravity in the bass. > > Ron Severin > > > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> > >    
(back) Subject: organ consultants and pricing From: "Randy Terry" <randy@peacham.homeip.net> Date: Mon, 6 Jun 2005 10:42:45 -0700   I've been following this thread on the *other* list, and the discussions have been from people who find it hard to see the grey areas.   The discussion started by a young man asking if people had an idea for a fair price per rank. As I understand it, a builder might quote a = ball-park price for rank (or stop in the case of compound stops.) This price would = be ball-park only, and it would take into account the cost of a console, electronics, chests, blowers, reservoirs, labor, etc. Anyone with any = sense can see that this figure is ONLY rough. The actual cost may be more or = less as the design and planning become more solidified.   Then someone suggested that the church hire a consultant. This brought in people who said (rightly so) that consultants are self serving. Then a builder chimed in that it is organists who are self-serving. And etc, etc!   In the case of my church, the builder made most of the decisions regarding pipe additions and voicing. After that, I designed a stoplist that makes sense both for literature and accompaniment. I included a number of = things that were for *ME* but these in no way affect the basic design and = function, and with the software based control system, anyone can make specification changes.   However, if I were organist at a church buying an expensive NEW organ, I would seek input from colleagues in other Episcopal churches, builders, = and perhaps one paid consultant. I would work with a small committee to make sure communication was open, and in the end, I would have not only my likes/dislikes, but the valued opinion of others.   I don't think consultants, builders, or organists are to be feared per se, but people who don't keep an open mind or someone who thinks of the instrument as "theirs." Those are the problems, and people in all those roles have them!   +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ Randy Terry Music Minister The Episcopal Church of St. Peter Redwood City, California        
(back) Subject: Re: celestes that aren't meant to be From: <Justinhartz@aol.com> Date: Mon, 6 Jun 2005 14:36:20 EDT   Aeolian made fantastic celestes. Perhaps you are referring to an Aeoline or other "whisper" stop. If this is the case, the Viola would just overpower the Aeoline. Always keep in mind that what is written on the stop knob or tab may not accurately describe the rank of pipes it is designed to turn on or off.   Cheers,   Justin Hartz  
(back) Subject: Re: fav. small American organs From: <Justinhartz@aol.com> Date: Mon, 6 Jun 2005 14:42:11 EDT   Actually, it is not that unusual to find a short compass 4' flute on an American organ from the mid Nineteenth Century, especially if it has only = one manual. Many of these instruments had stops which were divided into Bass and = Treble with the break occurring between tenor E and F.   Cheers,   Justin Hartz  
(back) Subject: Pipechat IRC tonight From: "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca> Date: Mon, 6 Jun 2005 14:52:49 -0400   Just a reminder that we shall be up and chatting tonight, as we do every = Monday and Friday evening. The Chat room opens at 9.00 Eastern Summer = Time.   Join us and meet up with some of the regulars!   See you there,   Bob Conway
(back) Subject: Complete ranks for sale, NYC From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Mon, 6 Jun 2005 18:40:24 EDT   For sale in NYC, East 30s, Manhattan. Prices do not include crating, packing materials, insurance, or shipping. Prefer that you pick up or send your team of trained squirrels.   Pipes as-is, from 1920s organ containing much 19th century pipework. All older ranks have a low C pipe added that was made to match when the = organ was rebuilt. Voiced on electropneumatic chests on the pressures indicated. =   There is room on either side of the installation pressure for successful = use on other pressures.   5-1/2" pressure:   8' Second Open Diapason (zinc and spotted metal) $300.00 8' Gross Flute (open pine, stopped bass) $300.00 8' Gamba (zinc and spotted metal, 19th century, box beards) $400.00 8' Dulciana (zinc and spotted metal, 19th century) $300.00 4' Harmonic Flute (13 wood, remainder spotted, 19th century) $250.00 8' Harmonic Tuba (zinc and hoyt metal, harmonic, English) $850.00   4-1/2" pressure:   8' Keraulophone (zinc and spotted metal, 19th century) $250.00 8' Dolce (zinc and spotted metal, 19th century) $250.00 8' Swell Open Diapason (zinc and spotted metal, 19th century) $300.00 4' Flauto Traverso (wood, harmonic) $200.00 8' Cornopean (zinc and spotted metal, 19th century) $800.00 8' Oboe (zinc and spotted, stem-and-bell, lift caps) $800.00 8' Orchestral Oboe (zinc and spotted, Willis pattern) $1,100.00   Miscellaneous:   AGO pedalboard $100.00 Stop rail with 63 stopkeys, probably 1970s Klann action $75.00 take both for $150.00   Contact either of these numbers this week:   Albert Jensen-Moulton (917) 903-8281 Sebastian Gluck (917) 749-0827  
(back) Subject: PD reprints From: "Jonathan Orwig" <giwro@adelphia.net> Date: Mon, 06 Jun 2005 16:16:52 -0700   Hello friends,   So many of you inquired about the Boulnois Quatre Pi=E8ces that I have decided to offer them as reprints...   This music was published in 1911, so it has long since passed into Public Domain (except in France, where copyright subsists for 100 years after the death of the composer when said person dies in service to the Republic)   You can access the order page at: http://evensongmusic.net/reprints.html   which also has the links for the mp3 demos in case you missed them last = week   Enjoy!   -- Jonathan Orwig Evensong Music, Media and Graphics New Organ and Choral Music http://www.evensongmusic.net    
(back) Subject: OHS 50th Annual Convention From: "Administrator" <admin@pipechat.org> Date: Mon, 6 Jun 2005 19:02:33 -0500   i am forwarding this at the request of Matthew Bellocchio, the Convention Chairman.   David   **************************************************************** OHS 50th Annual Convention in Southeast Massachusetts ("The Old Colony") July 12-18 2005   70 Great Performers, including: Ray Cornils, Frances Fitch, Rev. Peter Gomes, Will Headlee, Brian Jones, Peter Krasinski, Christopher Marks, Lorenz Maycher, Marian Metson, Rosalind Mohnsen, Thomas Murray, Sharon Rose Pfiefer, Sine Nomine Singers, Bruce Stevens, Peter Sykes.   46 Great Places, including: the largest church in Southeastern Massachusetts (with spectacular decorations and 5,500 light bulbs!); a miniature Gothic cathedral; Plimouth Plantation; a tour of E. M.Skinner sites, Reed & Barton Silversmiths Factory Store, the Old Colony Historical Society Silver Collection, the largest granite monument in the nation, the New Bedford Whaling Museum, elegant Greek Revival meetinghouses; buildings by Charles Brigham, Richard Upjohn, Russell Warren, H. H. Richardson and Henry Vaughan.   38 Great Organs, including: instruments by Casavant, Flentrop, Hook, Hutchings, Jardine, Johnson, Roche, Roosevelt, Simmons, Skinner and Stevens; the region's largest instruments; the oldest surviving Hook church organ; a Hook & Hastings theater organ; and the Roosevelt organ built for Trinity Church in Boston.   12 Great Meals, including: a Portuguese Buffet, a Pilgrim Feast, a New England Clambake, a dinner in a former church (with organ) and an elegant dinner at an historic private club.   6_ Great Days - Tuesday evening through Monday night.   1 Great Convention   OHS 50th Annual Convention in Southeast Massachusetts (The Old Colony) July 12-18, 2005   Single day registrations are also available. For full information, including convention schedule and registration form, visit www.organsociety.org/2005   -- **************************************** David Scribner Owner / Co-Administrator PipeChat   http://www.pipechat.org mailto:admin@pipechat.org  
(back) Subject: National Cathedral plans... From: "Randy Terry" <randy@peacham.homeip.net> Date: Mon, 6 Jun 2005 17:59:08 -0700   I can't believe nobody is interested in discussing the plans for new = organs at Washington Cathedral! Whasup??   +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ Randy Terry Music Minister The Episcopal Church of St. Peter Redwood City, California        
(back) Subject: Poem about a visit to WNC on tuning day From: "Randy Terry" <randy@peacham.homeip.net> Date: Mon, 6 Jun 2005 18:03:46 -0700     B Y G R E Y B R O W N April 25, 2001 ++++++++++++++++++++++++++ Nothing so incongruous   to the marriage of stone   to graceful arch,   to the union of light and colored glass   than this fog-horn blast   shifting the floor beneath us.   It's as if the pipes have gas,   all sanctity blown   as the docent apologizes,   her voice high-pitched   straining to explain,   "Monthly repairs,   so sorry for your visit,   must be done"   and then some.   We have come to receive,   but not these bullfrog tones,   Somewhere a man in dusty coveralls   is oblivious to our cringing   as he kneels to the coupling   of expectation and reality.   He is measurement, science and scale   where we would trust faith   to hold dominion.   Panes stutter   and the docent apologizes again,   like Oz, she begs us   to pay no attention   to the man behind the curtain.   Bass swells the ground   as somewhere   muscle comes close to securing beauty   and a tightening wrench   tinkers towards the holy.