PipeChat Digest #5395 - Wednesday, June 8, 2005
 
Re: channeling trumpets, again
  by "Andy Lawrence" <lawrenceandy@gmail.com>
National Cathedral
  by "David Baker" <dgb137@mac.com>
Looking for Reger and Dupre
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
Wicks Factory Tour
  by "Scott A Montgomery" <montre1978@yahoo.com>
Re: Wicks Factory Tour
  by "Scott A Montgomery" <montre1978@yahoo.com>
Re: National Cathedral Plans...
  by "Nathan Smith" <erzahler@sbcglobal.net>
flutes in English organs
  by "Daniel Hancock" <dhancock@brpae.com>
sesquialtra
  by "Daniel Hancock" <dhancock@brpae.com>
RE: sesquialtra
  by "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
RE: sesquialtra
  by "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
Re: War March of the Priests
  by "Karl Moyer" <kmoyer@millersville.edu>
Re: Looking for Reger and Dupre
  by "Karl Moyer" <kmoyer@millersville.edu>
Re: sesquialtra
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net>
Re: flutes in English organs
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net>
Re: War March of the Priests
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net>
Re: National Cathedral Plans...
  by "Jim McFarland" <mcfarland6@juno.com>
This week's mp3: Vivet's Toccata
  by "Jonathan Orwig" <giwro@adelphia.net>
Re: War March of the Priests
  by "M. W. Belcher" <littlebayus@yahoo.com>
Re: War March of the Priests
  by "Desiree'" <nicemusica@yahoo.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: channeling trumpets, again From: "Andy Lawrence" <lawrenceandy@gmail.com> Date: Tue, 7 Jun 2005 15:31:14 -0700   On 6/7/05, Andy Lawrence <lawrenceandy@gmail.com> wrote: > Oops, you already answered that question. Channeled toeboards it is > then! Well, then... in addition to a 4' octave, i'm also in search of > an 8' trumpet or other chorus reed for my swell. 61 or 73 notes. 3" > pressure or thereabouts. Expecting to spend real money on the latter. > Andy Addendum... the 4' Octave I'm in search of will be for the great  
(back) Subject: National Cathedral From: "David Baker" <dgb137@mac.com> Date: Tue, 7 Jun 2005 18:50:08 -0400   Do I remember correctly that at least part of the organ was "electrified" by Wicks?   David Baker (Boston)  
(back) Subject: Looking for Reger and Dupre From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Tue, 07 Jun 2005 19:45:23 -0500   Did Reger write anything else along the lines of his 'Benedictus' worthy of learning and playing?   For that matter, did Dupre write anything along the lines of Reger's 'Benedictus' worthy of learning and playing?   As ever, thanks.   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com          
(back) Subject: Wicks Factory Tour From: "Scott A Montgomery" <montre1978@yahoo.com> Date: Tue, 7 Jun 2005 18:04:13 -0700 (PDT)   I want to drop a note to everyone here on pipechat about Wicks organ = company. I went down to the St Louis area yesterday to help a couple of my friends = pack up a small pipe organ. When we finally made it to the church, the = organ had seen better days and we decided not to bother with the effort = and decided to pop over to the Wicks organ factory. (Just a quick 20 = minute drive from where we were located.) Even though we were totally unannounced visiting the Wicks factory, = everyone there was delighted to see us, and spent a few hours of there day = to visit with us and even had a late lunch. When arriving to the factory I noticed some rather large pipes along the = wall in the next room. As people were talking in the front room, I = continued to sneak my way into the room (ignoring a much needed restroom = break after all that driving!) to see a massive 3 manual organ. I was = impressed. The organ was built in the 60's and did a great job of = representing what organ building was of that time. It isn't my cup of = tea, but I knew something would be there that interested me. We took a brief tour of several of the areas of the factory; pipe = construction, case building, console building. WOW! So many employees = totally excited and dedicated to their particular task. The pipe making = truly blew my mind with the mixtures of lead being rather high, and I blew = into a newly unvoiced pipe and was surprised at the sound. Nothing I have = heard currently from Wicks. (I am used to tiny little Wicks practice = organs built in the 60s.) Off to the tower, where there is a very beautiful tall in-cased organ, = along with many other sets of pipes for listening through the main = console. Gamba celestes, concert flutes, french horns, English horns, = diapasons, etc. So many to listen too. All of this pipe work has an = extremely warm tone, pleasing to the ear and the eye. I could have sat = and played this organ for hours. The organ I am referring to can be found at: http://organ.wicks.com/display_page?p=3D200&s=3D6295 I am so excited by what I heard at the factory, that I must see the "New = Wicks" in the church setting, so I am traveling this week to Kalamazoo, = Michigan to visit Opus 6419. http://organ.wicks.com/display_page?p=3D200&s=3D6419 I have never been that impressed with the sound that Wicks has produced. = The only Wicks I have truly enjoyed playing is the massive Willis/Wicks at = St Mary's Cathedral in Peoria, Illinois. Along with my own feelings and = many others expressing negative opinions, it is very easy to get a bad = taste in your mouth about any company. BEWARE OF THIS! I have made a = complete turn around to any of these ideas and hope to be able to play = many of the new organs Wicks will be producing in the years to come. I = defiantly will be spending more time at the factory playing the organ in = the tower. BRAVO!           Scott Montgomery 619 W Church St Champaign, IL 61820 217-390-0158 www.ScottMontgomeryMusic.net  
(back) Subject: Re: Wicks Factory Tour From: "Scott A Montgomery" <montre1978@yahoo.com> Date: Tue, 7 Jun 2005 18:12:14 -0700 (PDT)   "I defiantly will be spending more time at the factory playing the organ in the tower."   Opps!!! That should be DEFINITELY   Scott A Montgomery <montre1978@yahoo.com> wrote: I want to drop a note to everyone here on pipechat about Wicks organ = company.   I went down to the St Louis area yesterday to help a couple of my friends = pack up a small pipe organ. When we finally made it to the church, the = organ had seen better days and we decided not to bother with the effort = and decided to pop over to the Wicks organ factory. (Just a quick 20 = minute drive from where we were located.)   Even though we were totally unannounced visiting the Wicks factory, = everyone there was delighted to see us, and spent a few hours of there day = to visit with us and even had a late lunch.   When arriving to the factory I noticed some rather large pipes along the = wall in the next room. As people were talking in the front room, I = continued to sneak my way into the room (ignoring a much needed restroom = break after all that driving!) to see a massive 3 manual organ. I was = impressed. The organ was built in the 60's and did a great job of = representing what organ building was of that time. It isn't my cup of tea, = but I knew something would be there that interested me.   We took a brief tour of several of the areas of the factory; pipe = construction, case building, console building. WOW! So many employees = totally excited and dedicated to their particular task. The pipe making = truly blew my mind with the mixtures of lead being rather high, and I blew = into a newly unvoiced pipe and was surprised at the sound. Nothing I have = heard currently from Wicks. (I am used to tiny little Wicks practice = organs built in the 60s.)   Off to the tower, where there is a very beautiful tall in-cased organ, = along with many other sets of pipes for listening through the main = console. Gamba celestes, concert flutes, french horns, English horns, = diapasons, etc. So many to listen too. All of this pipe work has an = extremely warm tone, pleasing to the ear and the eye. I could have sat and = played this organ for hours. The organ I am referring to can be found at: http://organ.wicks.com/display_page?p=3D200&s=3D6295   I am so excited by what I heard at the factory, that I must see the "New = Wicks" in the church setting, so I am traveling this week to Kalamazoo, = Michigan to visit Opus 6419. http://organ.wicks.com/display_page?p=3D200&s=3D6419   I have never been that impressed with the sound that Wicks has produced. = The only Wicks I have truly enjoyed playing is the massive Willis/Wicks at = St Mary's Cathedral in Peoria, Illinois. Along with my own feelings and = many others expressing negative opinions, it is very easy to get a bad = taste in your mouth about any company. BEWARE OF THIS! I have made a = complete turn around to any of these ideas and hope to be able to play = many of the new organs Wicks will be producing in the years to come. I = defiantly will be spending more time at the factory playing the organ in = the tower.   BRAVO!           Scott Montgomery 619 W Church St Champaign, IL 61820 217-390-0158 www.ScottMontgomeryMusic.net     ****************************************************************** "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org List-Subscribe: List-Digest: List-Unsubscribe:        
(back) Subject: Re: National Cathedral Plans... From: "Nathan Smith" <erzahler@sbcglobal.net> Date: Tue, 7 Jun 2005 21:54:49 -0400   Dear List,   Ah yes, Mr. Skinner's swan song, and his statement of the way an organ should be, is on its way out. A merciful end following the merciless slaughtering it endured at the hands of one Mr. Whiteford. You can thank perflex for those D-E magnets that are screwed on to the old Skinner toe boards.   I wonder if Wicks will acknowledge the fact that their equipment will be removed in their next electo-pneumatic bashing advertisement.   - Nate    
(back) Subject: flutes in English organs From: "Daniel Hancock" <dhancock@brpae.com> Date: Tue, 7 Jun 2005 21:06:29 -0500     There are quite a few old organs of this type still surviving in the United States, Britain and elsewhere (although none unfortunately in Missouri). Probably the best example of the old English style of organ in the USA is the early nineteenth-century organ by Appleton in the Metropolitan Museum of Art. A good example in Britain is the organ in Christ Church, Spitalfields, London (near Liverpool Street station), which is currently undergoing restoration by William Drake.   +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++   John--   Thank you for your further comments, and for providing that stoplist example. =20   My understanding of early American organ history is that it was primarily influenced by English instruments, though, we know of obvious points in contrast--like Tannenberg. =20   Would you agree that this is so?   Daniel Hancock Springfield, Missouri  
(back) Subject: sesquialtra From: "Daniel Hancock" <dhancock@brpae.com> Date: Tue, 7 Jun 2005 21:08:52 -0500   Christ Church, Spitalfields, London: Richard Bridge, 1735 (original specification)   Great Organ (GG, AA-d3)   Sesquialtra V   +++++++++++++++++++++++++   What would the composition of a five-rank sesquialtra be? 8, 4, 2-2/3, 2, and 1-3/5? If so, why would this have been done, rather than using a two rank sesquialtra (2-2/3 & 1-3/5) with the already present 8, 4, and 2 Diapasons?   Daniel Hancock  
(back) Subject: RE: sesquialtra From: "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Wed, 8 Jun 2005 14:18:59 +1200   >What would the composition of a five-rank sesquialtra be? 8, 4, 2-2/3, 2, and 1-3/5? If so, why would this have been done, rather than using a two rank sesquialtra (2-2/3 & 1-3/5) with the already present 8, 4, and 2 Diapasons?   I don't know what the composition of that Sesquialt[e]ra is or was, but it would necessarily be of Cornet pitches, since its purpose was more that of = a Mixture and had Diapason pipes and not flutes. It may have been 12.15.17.19.22, or some of the ranks may have been doubled right from the start.   Ross    
(back) Subject: RE: sesquialtra From: "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Wed, 8 Jun 2005 14:27:51 +1200     Sorry for the typO. Please note the word below, in capitals, which I accidentally omitted.   >I don't know what the composition of that Sesquialt[e]ra is or was, but = it would "not"necessarily be of Cornet pitches, since its purpose was more = that of a Mixture and had Diapason pipes and not flutes. It may have been 12.15.17.19.22, or some of the ranks may have been doubled right from the start.   Ross      
(back) Subject: Re: War March of the Priests From: "Karl Moyer" <kmoyer@millersville.edu> Date: Tue, 07 Jun 2005 22:49:36 -0400   I was at Union Seminary 50 =AD 61 and recall a chapel service where one of th= e music students played this for a postlude on morning. Perhaps a prank, though I=B9m not sure. Dr. Baker came flying through the door and all but pulled _______ right off the organ bench!!   Karl E. Moyer Lancaster PA  
(back) Subject: Re: Looking for Reger and Dupre From: "Karl Moyer" <kmoyer@millersville.edu> Date: Tue, 07 Jun 2005 22:55:07 -0400   Did Reger write anything else along the lines of his 'Benedictus' worthy of learning and playing?     Robert Noehren used to play Reger=B9s =B3Melodia=B2 with ravishing beauty.   Karl E. Moyer Lancaster PA  
(back) Subject: Re: sesquialtra From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net> Date: Tue, 7 Jun 2005 22:17:49 -0500   Sesquialtera (more commonly spelt Sesquialtra or Sexquialtra in eighteenth-century England) was the common name for the Great Mixture. Usually, but not always, it was a tierce mixture. Most commonly this was = a three rank mixture beginning at 17-19-22, although quite often it was a = four or five rank mixture. The composition varied, but might have been 15-17-19-22, 17-19-22-26, 17-19-22-24 or suchlike for a four rank mixture; 15-17-19-22-26, 17-19-22-26-29, 17-19-22-24-26 or suchlike for a five rank mixture. The English stop was a chorus stop and had very little to do = with the German Sesquialtera, which is usually 12-17 and more often than not a solo stop.   John Speller   ----- Original Message ----- From: "Daniel Hancock" <dhancock@brpae.com> To: <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Tuesday, June 07, 2005 9:08 PM Subject: sesquialtra     Christ Church, Spitalfields, London: Richard Bridge, 1735 (original specification)   Great Organ (GG, AA-d3)   Sesquialtra V   +++++++++++++++++++++++++   What would the composition of a five-rank sesquialtra be? 8, 4, 2-2/3, 2, and 1-3/5? If so, why would this have been done, rather than using a two rank sesquialtra (2-2/3 & 1-3/5) with the already present 8, 4, and 2 Diapasons?        
(back) Subject: Re: flutes in English organs From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net> Date: Tue, 7 Jun 2005 22:23:13 -0500   Yes, I would. I used to live in Pennsylvania and am quite a fan of Tannenberg. However, I think that for a long time the predominant organ culture in America was English rather than German. For example, the 1838 Schwab organ at the Old Cathedral in St. Louis, built by a Swiss immigrant trained in the German tradition, seems to have had a G-compass with keyboards going down to 10.2/3' G. This was standard in the = Anglo-American tradition until 1850 but something unheard of in German organs. I guess Schwab had to conform to the prevailing culture in order to sell organs.   John Speller   ----- Original Message ----- From: "Daniel Hancock" <dhancock@brpae.com> To: <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Tuesday, June 07, 2005 9:06 PM Subject: flutes in English organs       There are quite a few old organs of this type still surviving in the United States, Britain and elsewhere (although none unfortunately in Missouri). Probably the best example of the old English style of organ in the USA is the early nineteenth-century organ by Appleton in the Metropolitan Museum of Art. A good example in Britain is the organ in Christ Church, Spitalfields, London (near Liverpool Street station), which is currently undergoing restoration by William Drake.   +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++   John--   Thank you for your further comments, and for providing that stoplist example.   My understanding of early American organ history is that it was primarily influenced by English instruments, though, we know of obvious points in contrast--like Tannenberg.   Would you agree that this is so?      
(back) Subject: Re: War March of the Priests From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net> Date: Tue, 7 Jun 2005 22:29:20 -0500   My wife was a Deputy at the 1997 Episcopal Church General Convention in Philadelphia and I went along too for the ride. We had a Convention Eucharist at which the Archbishop of Canterbury was the preacher, and at which all the bishops of the Episcopal Church processed in and out. The organist was Peter Conte and he played the "War March of the Priests" as = all the bishops were processing out. Our own bishop had a very broad grin on his face when Peter Conte started playing, but I think it was lost on most of them.   John Speller   ----- Original Message ----- From: "Karl Moyer" <kmoyer@millersville.edu> To: "pipechat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Tuesday, June 07, 2005 9:49 PM Subject: Re: War March of the Priests     I was at Union Seminary 50 =AD 61 and recall a chapel service where one of = the music students played this for a postlude on morning. Perhaps a prank, though I=B9m not sure. Dr. Baker came flying through the door and all = but pulled _______ right off the organ bench!!        
(back) Subject: Re: National Cathedral Plans... From: "Jim McFarland" <mcfarland6@juno.com> Date: Tue, 7 Jun 2005 23:27:35 -0400     On Tue, 7 Jun 2005 21:54:49 -0400 Nathan Smith <erzahler@sbcglobal.net> writes: > Dear List, > > Ah yes, Mr. Skinner's swan song,         ???   Not hardly, there were many more after that one.     Jim  
(back) Subject: This week's mp3: Vivet's Toccata From: "Jonathan Orwig" <giwro@adelphia.net> Date: Tue, 07 Jun 2005 20:41:57 -0700   Deeper into the woods of obscurity we go....   This week we hear the Toccata of Armand Vivet. Vivet was a pupil of Gigout (to whom this piece is dedicated) and choirmaster for him at St. Augustin in Paris. It's a happy little 3-minute piece, mostly on the manuals. http://evensongmusic.net/audio/VivetToccata.mp3   Enjoy!   -- Jonathan Orwig Evensong Music, Media and Graphics New Organ and Choral Music http://www.evensongmusic.net    
(back) Subject: Re: War March of the Priests From: "M. W. Belcher" <littlebayus@yahoo.com> Date: Tue, 7 Jun 2005 20:56:31 -0700 (PDT)   Greetings to all!   I don't see why Dr. Baker got so upset about this piece... so what if someone has given it the title of "War March of the Priests..." One can also use the tempo indication as the title...   Anyway....   The first time I heard this selection was at an imitation "Tom Thumb" wedding that we classmates put on in the second grade... I believe this piece was the piece used for us to march in to the auditorium...   I often wondered what the name of the piece was, and when I heard it and was able to ascertain the title of the piece I was so overjoyed...   A number of years ago I could play it pretty well... This summer I'll be doing some subbing for a number of sundays at a church, and I hope to "revive," i. e., resurrect this piece and play it with much gusto, albeit on an Allen electronic...   Best wishes to all,     Morton Belcher fellow list member...   =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D   --- Karl Moyer <kmoyer@millersville.edu> wrote:   > I was at Union Seminary 50 &#65533; 61 and recall a chapel > service where one of the > music students played this for a postlude on > morning. Perhaps a prank, > though I=B9m not sure. Dr. Baker came flying through > the door and all but > pulled _______ right off the organ bench!! > > Karl E. Moyer > Lancaster PA > > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital > organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> > >       __________________________________ Discover Yahoo! Find restaurants, movies, travel and more fun for the weekend. Check it = out! http://discover.yahoo.com/weekend.html    
(back) Subject: Re: War March of the Priests From: "Desiree'" <nicemusica@yahoo.com> Date: Tue, 7 Jun 2005 21:16:44 -0700 (PDT)   Thats a great idea and I often do it...use the tempo indication as title. But the War March is one of the most festive pieces that has been adapted = to the organ. The arrangement of it in the Oxford Ceremonial Music book is = one tht is most "organistic" and makes the most sense to me. I like to go = at a tempo of 95-100 with a lot of breadth. just imagine..a lot of mature = men all garbed up iun church's finest walking thru the nave. The title = gives a great use-indication...bishops visits, ordinations, etc. DH     From Desiree' T. Desiree' Hines Chicago, IL 60610 ---------------------------- For Compositions by Desiree' Frog Music Press www.frogmusic.com ------------------------------- FOR CONCERTS BY DESIREE' http://www.concertartist.info/bios/hines.html --------------------------------------------- Desiree' Hines plays the Organ at Fourth Presbyterian Church of Chicago   http://www.organlive.com/index.php?p=3D6&album=3DDesiree%20Hines%20plays%20= the%20Organ%20at%20The%20Fourth%20Presbyterian%20Church%20of%20Chicago __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around http://mail.yahoo.com