PipeChat Digest #5396 - Wednesday, June 8, 2005
 
RE: War March of the Priests
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
Flashy patriotic?
  by "Charles Peery" <cepeery@earthlink.net>
Re: National Cathedral Plans
  by "Stan Yoder" <vze2myh5@verizon.net>
Re: Flashy patriotic?
  by <pepehomer@aol.com>
Deteriorating Organ Pipes
  by <pepehomer@aol.com>
Re: Flashy patriotic?
  by "Paul Smith" <kipsmith@getgoin.net>
English influence on early American organs
  by "Daniel Hancock" <dhancock@brpae.com>
Mendelssohn March of the Priests/Liverpool
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Re: Flashy patriotic?
  by "Robert Lind" <lindr@core.com>
Re: Flashy patriotic?
  by "Paul Valtos" <chercapa@enter.net>
Re: Flashy patriotic?
  by "James Edward Mackay" <ymcmlx@gmail.com>
RE: War March of the Priests
  by "Desiree'" <nicemusica@yahoo.com>
Re: Flashy patriotic?
  by "N. Russotto" <ravenrockdesigns@gmail.com>
St. Johns Anglican Church Lunenburg NS restoration
  by "Daniel Hopkins" <danielwh@ns.sympatico.ca>
Sad news: Billy Nalle
  by "Tim Bovard" <tmbovard@earthlink.net>
Re: English influence on early American organs
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: Deteriorating Organ Pipes
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Wangerin Organ
  by "GB" <gblack@ocslink.com>
 

(back) Subject: RE: War March of the Priests From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Wed, 08 Jun 2005 07:20:12 -0500   I personally would have inserted "The Queen's Procession" by Oliphant Chuckerbutty in there somewhere! But John is right - nothing was more appropriate.   From one who did just that for a postlude for a new bishop's visitation once upon a time.   When I was in high school, "The War March of the Priests" was used a relief from Pomp and Circumstance, particularly for capping ceremonies and the like. I remember playing with someone a 2-piano version of it and P&C.   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com     -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of John L. Speller Sent: Tuesday, June 07, 2005 10:29 PM To: PipeChat Subject: Re: War March of the Priests   My wife was a Deputy at the 1997 Episcopal Church General Convention in Philadelphia and I went along too for the ride. We had a Convention Eucharist at which the Archbishop of Canterbury was the preacher, and at which all the bishops of the Episcopal Church processed in and out. The organist was Peter Conte and he played the "War March of the Priests" as all the bishops were processing out. Our own bishop had a very broad grin on his face when Peter Conte started playing, but I think it was lost on most of them.        
(back) Subject: Flashy patriotic? From: "Charles Peery" <cepeery@earthlink.net> Date: Wed, 8 Jun 2005 08:46:49 -0400   This will be my first time conducting a big Patriotic Concert at the church I've served for 11 months. Seems it's traditional that the organist plays "Exit Music". Last year (and most years, I'm given to understand) it was an unknown-to-me solo arrangement of "The Stars and Stripes Forever". Everyone is clamoring for this again, and I don't own it or know it. I was actually in attendance for the concert last year, and I recall thinking that the arrangement was less than effective... reduced tempo in order to articulate the repeated pedal notes in the B section, the need to have a piccolo player (who couldn't be heard) to play the obbligato.   Are there alternatives? (I have a great pianist who accompanies, so, temperature anomalies notwithstanding, a piano/organ duet is possible. As is a piano-four-hands arrangement. Although, I went to the music store and didn't find any suitable duets that avoided pieces that are already being performed in another way.)   I already am familiar with: the John Knowles Paine variations on the Star Spangled Banner, the Wilbur Held variations on "America" in the Fall Festivals book, the Dudley Buck SSB variations.   Anybody have recommendations for a flashy patriotic encore piece?   Thanks, Chuck Peery St. Louis    
(back) Subject: Re: National Cathedral Plans From: "Stan Yoder" <vze2myh5@verizon.net> Date: Wed, 08 Jun 2005 09:47:29 -0400   I believe the scuttlebutt at A-S was that The Old Man used a good bit of = pipework from the Methuen Walcker (which he then owned, yes?) for the WNC job.   Stan Yoder Pittsburgh  
(back) Subject: Re: Flashy patriotic? From: <pepehomer@aol.com> Date: Wed, 08 Jun 2005 09:52:09 -0400   I have an arragement that I believe is still available from OHS of "Stars = and Stripes Forever" arranged by Biggs. I use it and it seems as close to = the original as you can get with two hands and some feet. You can even = skip the piccolo part if you'd like (and I do). Justin Karch Organist, Holy Trinity LCMS Rome, GA -----Original Message----- From: Charles Peery <cepeery@earthlink.net> To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Wed, 8 Jun 2005 08:46:49 -0400 Subject: Flashy patriotic?     This will be my first time conducting a big Patriotic Concert at the = church I've served for 11 months. Seems it's traditional that the organist = plays "Exit Music". Last year (and most years, I'm given to understand) it = was an unknown-to-me solo arrangement of "The Stars and Stripes Forever". = Everyone is clamoring for this again, and I don't own it or know it. I was = actually in attendance for the concert last year, and I recall thinking = that the arrangement was less than effective... reduced tempo in order to = articulate the repeated pedal notes in the B section, the need to have a = piccolo player (who couldn't be heard) to play the obbligato. Are there alternatives? (I have a great pianist who accompanies, so, = temperature anomalies notwithstanding, a piano/organ duet is possible. As = is a piano-four-hands arrangement. Although, I went to the music store and = didn't find any suitable duets that avoided pieces that are already being = performed in another way.) I already am familiar with: the John Knowles Paine variations on the Star = Spangled Banner, the Wilbur Held variations on "America" in the Fall = Festivals book, the Dudley Buck SSB variations. Anybody have recommendations for a flashy patriotic encore piece? Thanks, Chuck Peery St. Louis ****************************************************************** "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org>  
(back) Subject: Deteriorating Organ Pipes From: <pepehomer@aol.com> Date: Wed, 08 Jun 2005 09:57:46 -0400   This was actually in Newsweek magazine a few weeks back, and I just = happened to run across it online http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/7856686/site/newsweek/ Has anyone experienced this, or for that matter, have any real idea what's = going on? Justin Karch Organist, Holy Trinity LCMS Rome, GA  
(back) Subject: Re: Flashy patriotic? From: "Paul Smith" <kipsmith@getgoin.net> Date: Wed, 8 Jun 2005 09:12:33 -0500   I have an old piano arrangement of "American Patrol" March that I worked = up for organ solo. Our Swell is on the far left at the front of the = sanctuary, and the Great on the far right. As the piece progresses from its ppp opening( beginning on the Swell on the far left); through fortissimo (tutti!); and back into the ppp distance (on the Great to the right) they can follow the "Patrol" across the room with their ears. It includes the tune "Columbia, the Gem of the Ocean" at its climax, along with some drum immitations that probably work better on piano. It was written in the = 1880s, but is still a crowd-pleaser, without getting involved in contemporary politics or the incipient police state now being promoted by some in this country. Even without the spatial effects, it can still be thrilling. I = use it for the close of a July Fourth Hymn-sing and concert (used every year = to fill the time between the church picnic and when it gets dark enough to start the fireworks). It would work well in an informal arrangement with a =   piano. It is not nearly as hard as a good "Stars and Stripes" either!     ----- Original Message ----- From: "Charles Peery" <cepeery@earthlink.net> > > Are there alternatives? (I have a great pianist who accompanies, so, > temperature anomalies notwithstanding, a piano/organ duet is possible. = As > is a piano-four-hands arrangement. Although, I went to the music store > and didn't find any suitable duets that avoided pieces that are already > being performed in another way.) > > Anybody have recommendations for a flashy patriotic encore piece?      
(back) Subject: English influence on early American organs From: "Daniel Hancock" <dhancock@brpae.com> Date: Wed, 8 Jun 2005 09:12:40 -0500   >Yes, I would. I used to live in Pennsylvania and am quite a fan of >Tan= nenberg. However, I think that for a long time the predominant organ >cu= lture in America was English rather than German. For example, the 1838 >= Schwab organ at the Old Cathedral in St. Louis, built by a Swiss immigran= t >trained in the German tradition, seems to have had a G-compass with >k= eyboards going down to 10.2/3' G. This was standard in the Anglo-America= n >tradition until 1850 but something unheard of in German organs. I gue= ss >Schwab had to conform to the prevailing culture in order to sell orga= ns.   I wouldn't have thought that the English influence would have been so str= ong by as late as 1838--are the manual compasses the only real influence?= I understand from the OHS Database that the organ no longer exists, but= there are other organs built by Mathias Schwab listed. Interestingly en= ough, the grand majority of them seem to be in the Midwest, which also su= rprises me, given that we're talking about the mid-nineteenth century (bu= t really, Springfield, Missouri is the last place on earth to get anythin= g common elsewhere). Alas, most of them are reported as "largely known f= rom historical documents, and therefore specifications are not largely kn= own, but one that was listed was the extant organ of the CATHEDRAL BASILI= CA OF THE ASSUMPTION in COVINGTON, KENTUCKY USA (stoplist to follow).   It is especially interesting to me that this organ seems to have a German= influence in nomenclature, at least, but then, there are English hold-ou= ts as well. =20   Indeed, Manual II seems to be but a miniature of Manual I, and it could f= urther possibly be conjectured (and conjectured only, because I have only= this stoplist with which to appraise the instrument) that this organ was= based on the German werk principal--that is, to say, that the Pedal is b= ased on a 16' Principal (can you call the Open Bass that?), Manual I on t= he 8' Principal, and Manual 2 on the 4' Principal. But other than that, = Manual II seems to be identical to the primary division in many respects,= although I would guess it the be the subordinate division. Both have an= 8' Gedackt, but contrasting 8' strings, a 4' Principal or Octave, 4' Roh= rflute, a Quinte, and Super Octav. You might say that the Oboe is the "e= cho" of the Trumpet, although I can't=20 tell if this is the case in this instance. The pedal has surprising ind= ependence, at least for this time in the mid-nineteenth century (when did= we go to those sole universal 16' Bourdons?)   Now that I've analyzed it on paper (I'm hearing what I want to in my head= , already!) I suppose it's time to make a visit!   Now then, I have to ask Ross--you've stated in the past on this list that= your New Zealand organ tradition is much different from our American tra= dition. But having the same roots, do you suppose that they really are? = Of course, there have been many departures from this English school of t= hinking since then, but in organs from this time, perhaps I could draw a = reasonable comparison!   Daniel Hancock Springfield, Missouri=20   Matthias Schwab Organ, c.1859 West Gallery   MANUAL I 16 Bourdon 8 Principal 8 Gedackt 8 Viol d'Gamba 4 Octav 4 Rohrfl=F6te 2 Super Octav 2 2/3 Quinte Mixtur IV 8 Trumpet Discant 8 Trumpet Bass   MANUAL II 8 Gedackt 8 Dulciana 4 Principal 4 Rohrfl=F6te 2 2/3 Quinte 2 Super Octav 8 Oboe   PEDAL 16 Open Bass 8 Violone 4 Flute   Tremolo Zimbelstern   COUPLERS MANUAL II TO MANUAL I MANUAL I TO PEDAL   MANUAL COMPASS 54 notes C to f ''' PEDAL COMPASS 25 notes C to c'  
(back) Subject: Mendelssohn March of the Priests/Liverpool From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Wed, 8 Jun 2005 10:37:36 EDT   I heard John Kitchen perform what I believe was the Best transcription =   (which would have been appropriate) on the Willis at Saint George's Hall, Liverpool. It was part of a conference on the ethics of organ conservation = several years ago. Despite the condition of the instrument, it was a moving = interpretation (especially the "c" section) and the organ was magnificent as it stood. It is my understanding that both the organ and the Hall are to undergo =   refurbishment in the coming years. The wooden floor was removed, in part, = so that we could see the famous Minton tiles.   Sebastian M. Gluck New York City http://www.glucknewyork.com/  
(back) Subject: Re: Flashy patriotic? From: "Robert Lind" <lindr@core.com> Date: Wed, 8 Jun 2005 11:02:39 -0500   Tooting my own horn:   Augsburg Fortress published two volumes of organ pieces of mine in 2004, = and they both start out with patriotic marches in 19th-century march style:   Organ Images for Spring and Summer (ISBN 0-8006-7695-5) has America the Beautiful, and Organ Images for Fall and Winter (ISBN 0-8006-7682-3) has Battle Hymn of the Republic. Each is around 4-5 minutes long and are designed as postlude and recital material.   Here's what a couple of vendors said on their websites about the latter of these volumes (which came out first):   ORGAN IMAGES FOR FALL AND WINTER Robert Lind 0800676823 $19.50     This is a collection of note! Lind's collection includes three free = pieces, as well as 9 chorale prelude settings for organ. With organists seeking = the "latest" creative interpretation of various hymn tunes, these settings provide new insights and approaches to well-known and not-so-well-known tunes. Of particular note are his settings of "Battle Hymn of the = Republic" and "Draw Us in the Spirit's Tether." Though not easy, every composition = is superb. Highly recommended.   Contents: Battle Hymn of the Republic; Draw Us in the Sprit's Tether; = Elegy; Hark, the Glad Sound!; Jesus, Priceless Treasure; Let All Mortal Flesh = Keep Silence; Joseph Dearest, Joseph Mine; May the Angels Lead You into = Paradise; Oh, Come, Oh, Come, Emmanuel; Oh, Love, How Deep; Praeludium in d; = Whatever God Ordains is Right     "Organ Images for Fall and Winter" - by Robert Lind published by Augsburg Fortress Twelve great pieces with a lot of movement and beauty! of moderate to more advanced skill level, the titles are "Battle Hymn of the Republic," "Draw = Us in the Spirit's Tether" (also "Jesus, Come! For We Invite You"), "Elegy," "Hark,the Glad Sound!" (also "The Spirit Sends Us Forth to Serve"), = "Jesus, Priceless Treasure," "Let All Mortal Flesh Keep Silence," "Long Ago and = Far Away" (also "Joseph Dearest, Joseph Mine"), "May the Angels Lead You into Paradise," "Oh, Come, Oh, Come, Emmanuel," "Oh, Love, How Deep" (also "Oh, Wondrous Type! Oh Vision Fair"), "Praeludium in d," and "Whatever God Ordains Is Right."   End of commercial.   Bob Lind   ----- Original Message ----- From: Charles Peery <cepeery@earthlink.net>   > I already am familiar with: the John Knowles Paine variations on the > Star Spangled Banner, the Wilbur Held variations on "America" in the > Fall Festivals book, the Dudley Buck SSB variations. > > Anybody have recommendations for a flashy patriotic encore piece? > > Thanks, > Chuck Peery    
(back) Subject: Re: Flashy patriotic? From: "Paul Valtos" <chercapa@enter.net> Date: Wed, 8 Jun 2005 12:15:56 -0400   Dear Chuck, I don't know the composer but Tom Hazleton played a version, I = believe, at the West Park in Allentown last year. You might e mail him and ask him what he used. I unfortunately do not have his e mail address or phone = number but I'm sure someone on this site has it. If all fails, Allen organ must have it. Paul ----- Original Message ----- From: "Charles Peery" <cepeery@earthlink.net> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Wednesday, June 08, 2005 8:46 AM Subject: Flashy patriotic?     > This will be my first time conducting a big Patriotic Concert at the > church I've served for 11 months. Seems it's traditional that the > organist plays "Exit Music". Last year (and most years, I'm given to > understand) it was an unknown-to-me solo arrangement of "The Stars and > Stripes Forever". Everyone is clamoring for this again, and I don't > own it or know it. I was actually in attendance for the concert last > year, and I recall thinking that the arrangement was less than > effective... reduced tempo in order to articulate the repeated pedal > notes in the B section, the need to have a piccolo player (who couldn't > be heard) to play the obbligato. > > Are there alternatives? (I have a great pianist who accompanies, so, > temperature anomalies notwithstanding, a piano/organ duet is possible. > As is a piano-four-hands arrangement. Although, I went to the music > store and didn't find any suitable duets that avoided pieces that are > already being performed in another way.) > > I already am familiar with: the John Knowles Paine variations on the > Star Spangled Banner, the Wilbur Held variations on "America" in the > Fall Festivals book, the Dudley Buck SSB variations. > > Anybody have recommendations for a flashy patriotic encore piece? > > Thanks, > Chuck Peery > St. Louis > > > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> > > > > -- > No virus found in this incoming message. > Checked by AVG Anti-Virus. > Version: 7.0.323 / Virus Database: 267.6.6 - Release Date: 6/8/2005 > >    
(back) Subject: Re: Flashy patriotic? From: "James Edward Mackay" <ymcmlx@gmail.com> Date: Wed, 8 Jun 2005 11:20:14 -0500   Greetings.   On 6/8/05, Robert Lind <lindr@core.com> wrote:   > Organ Images for Spring and Summer (ISBN 0-8006-7695-5) has America the > Beautiful, and Organ Images for Fall and Winter (ISBN 0-8006-7682-3) has > Battle Hymn of the Republic.   These look quite good. [makes note to self for music store pilgrimage]   Battle Hymn of the Republic's mention, and Charles' note, reminded me of Jean Langlais' setting of the same in American Folk-Hymn Settings for Organ (H T FitzSimons Co/Fred Bock Music Cos, no F0623).   Too, in many hymnals FINLANDIA is set with a national/patriotic text.=20 That might be an option. NAVY HYMN would be another.   James   > ----- Original Message ----- > From: Charles Peery <cepeery@earthlink.net> >=20 > > Anybody have recommendations for a flashy patriotic encore piece?   --=20 JAMES EDWARD MACKAY Fargo, North Dakota USA ymcmlx@gmail.com evensong@att.net  
(back) Subject: RE: War March of the Priests From: "Desiree'" <nicemusica@yahoo.com> Date: Wed, 8 Jun 2005 09:29:04 -0700 (PDT)   The War March was indeed used at my eldest neices HS Graduation as the = postlude/recessional. Thats what got me hooked on it.       __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around http://mail.yahoo.com
(back) Subject: Re: Flashy patriotic? From: "N. Russotto" <ravenrockdesigns@gmail.com> Date: Wed, 8 Jun 2005 12:43:48 -0400   I'm surprised that no one (that I can see) has mentioned Charles Ives' Variations on America. I think it was part of VF's La Belle Epoque tape back in the mid 70's. There is a video clip of this on the VFL website:   http://www.virgilfoxlegacy.com/ Click "Chronology"   Scroll Down to "Videos"   And click La belle Epoque   Its a great piece and is sounds very flashy. If I were you, I would perform it in red leather organmasters with a sequined blue suit and white ruffled shirt. (G)   Nick   --=20 Nicholas F. Russotto Somers, Connecticut Organist, Holy Cross PNCC Enfield, Connecticut Moderator/Owner: Monarch of Music=20 http://launch.groups.yahoo.com/group/monarch_of_music/  
(back) Subject: St. Johns Anglican Church Lunenburg NS restoration From: "Daniel Hopkins" <danielwh@ns.sympatico.ca> Date: Wed, 8 Jun 2005 14:21:03 -0300   I will be attending St Johns Church on Sunday. The first service since the devestating fire mostly destroyed this historic Building. I will take =   many pictures throughout the day there. Of course the New Casavant Organ wont be installed untill late October. I am anxious to see the just finished newly restored building. At 3 pm is the first service in the building, then it will be open for tours the rest of the afternoon, = finally ending at 7 to 8 pm a chime recital on the restored chime of 11 bells.      
(back) Subject: Sad news: Billy Nalle From: "Tim Bovard" <tmbovard@earthlink.net> Date: Wed, 08 Jun 2005 12:37:02 -0500   Dear Pipechatters,   The following notice appeared on the Theatre Organ List, and I forward it here for your information.   --Tim ------------------------------------------------------------------   Friends:   It's with great sadness that I report that Organist, Billy Nalle passed = away this weekend here in his home town, Fort Myers. I think he was born in = 1925 or 1923 (but I'm not really sure)   Billy's career is too large to attempt to list it all here. I met him = via my friend Walter Draughon in about 1983 and had the opportunity to see and play the New York Paramount Wurlitzer in its new home in Whicata. Billy retired to Fort Myers and lived just up the street from me. I often saw his lime green pants at the grocery store and found his Honda Civic 1977 parked in = the parking lot.   Those of you that are PLUGGED in via email to other organists may pass = this info along as you see fit.   Stephen Brittain      
(back) Subject: Re: English influence on early American organs From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Wed, 8 Jun 2005 10:40:51 -0700 (PDT)   Hello,   I am not particularly well clued-up obout the precise origins of US organ-building, but there are obvious links between the US and the UK.   More importantly, whilst the UK influence may appear to be from England, that same influence is at least German in part....I'll try to explain.   Go right back in time, and the influences on UK organ-building were those of Bernard and Christian Schmidt; essentially German organ-builders working in the UK. Neatly side-stepping Renatus Harris (!) we can also see the German influence in the organs of John Snetzler, who had, it is believed, worked on the great Muller organ at Haarlem. Indeed, there was a useful interchange between Holland and England well into the 18th century, and there is an extant Schmidt organ at Edam in the Netherlands.   The big problem concerned the Italian model, where organs merely had (at best) pull-downs, or just "manuals only" as represented by the John Stanley style of organ-voluntary and the Organ Concertii of Handel.   Although the Echo division on the English style of instrument was eventually replaced by a Swell; the tonal differences between a typically English organ of 1750 and one built in 1840 would have been quite small; save for maybe a pedal register or two at 16ft, but only normally down to low G (10.2/3ft).   There was a dramatic seed-change in the style of organ-building associated with William Hill, the organist Dr Gauntlett of the Congregational Church tradition and their discussion with Mendelssohn. This resulted in the "German-style" of British organ-building, which emerged around 1845 or so, which resulted in some remarkable instruments being built with C-compass manuals and pedals, as well as a degree of independence for the pedal divisions. One of the most remarkable was the organ of Great George Street, Congregational Church, Liverpool, which (thanks to Henry Willis IV) I played after the closure of the building.   Liverpool is perhaps significant, for this was the premiere departure point for America. (This was the place from where the "Titanic" started her fateful journey).   Now, wasn't there a Jardine connection in the US?   Jardine in the UK, were based near to Liverpool, in the city of Manchester....only about 25 miles away.... so far as I am aware.   It was the North of England, rather than the South, which was most influenced by the German-style, and this undoubtedly reached a pinnacle with the building of the great Schulze organs circa.1857 at Doncaster, Leeds, Newcastle (Tyne Dock) and Wigan.   That same Schulze influence was the influence on T.C. Lewis and, by default, on G.Donald Harrison, who admired the Lewis style of chorus-work.   So, it is perhaps not unusual to find the German influence almost everywhere in UK organ-building, and any Anglo-German admixture such as Daniel describers, would be well within the character of what we jokingly call "the English tradition," which was almost anything but English until well towards the end of the 19th century.   I guess that's as clear as a muddy pool!   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK     --- Daniel Hancock <dhancock@brpae.com> wrote:   > I wouldn't have thought that the English influence > would have been so strong by as late as 1838--are > the manual compasses the only real influence?   __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around http://mail.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Re: Deteriorating Organ Pipes From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Wed, 8 Jun 2005 10:55:00 -0700 (PDT)   Hello,   This subject is a bit of a hardy-annual.   It's not just "tin worm" which seems to be the problem, but also chemical attack on tin/lead alloys.   It's interesting, but the organ-pipes made from pure Cornish Tin from the UK, seem to stand up better to the rabages of time. The case pipes (and others) at Haarlem used Cornish Tin to the best of my knowledge, and they are as perfect now as the day they were made.   Apparently, it is the impurities in the tin or tin alloys which cause the problem, and like anything else, there is good tin and bad tin.   I didn't find out until recently, that the tin from Poland contains about 5% (?) of silver!   Somewhere on piporg-L, there is a very learned article in the archives, which discusses the "tin worm" phenomenon in great detail.   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK       --- pepehomer@aol.com wrote:   > This was actually in Newsweek magazine a few weeks > back, and I just happened to run across it online > > http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/7856686/site/newsweek/ >       __________________________________ Discover Yahoo! Find restaurants, movies, travel and more fun for the weekend. Check it = out! http://discover.yahoo.com/weekend.html    
(back) Subject: Wangerin Organ From: "GB" <gblack@ocslink.com> Date: Wed, 8 Jun 2005 13:03:33 -0500   HI list, I help to remove a 1916 Wangerin organ from a church in = Cascade, Iowa yesterday. We are going to rebuild the organ. Of = interest was the original hand pumping mech. still functional. An = electric blower was attatched to it several years ago. Gary