PipeChat Digest #5397 - Wednesday, June 8, 2005
 
Re: Sad news: Billy Nalle
  by "M. W. Belcher" <littlebayus@yahoo.com>
A Tale of Three Manuals (xposted)
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
OHS Convention July 12-18 Brockton, Mass.
  by "William T. Van Pelt" <bill@organsociety.org>
Dobson at Verizon Hall (was WNC) (X-post)
  by "Harry Martenas" <harry.martenas@gmail.com>
Re: OHS Convention July 12-18 Brockton, Mass.
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net>
Re: Looking for Reger and Dupre
  by <RMaryman@aol.com>
Tin Pest, et cetera
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Re: OHS Convention July 12-18 Brockton, Mass.
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net>
new Bach ms. found
  by "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
Flashy Patriotic
  by "Daniel Hancock" <dhancock@brpae.com>
Re: Deteriorating Organ Pipes
  by "firman1" <firman1@prodigy.net>
Re: OHS Convention July 12-18 Brockton, Mass.
  by "Jim McFarland" <mcfarland6@juno.com>
Re: Tin Pest, et cetera
  by "Jim McFarland" <mcfarland6@juno.com>
patriotic number
  by "Dennis Steckley" <kzrev@rr1.net>
RE: patriotic number
  by "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
Is it just me?
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
are the masterworks "difficult?"
  by "Randy Terry" <randy@peacham.homeip.net>
Re: channeling trumpets, again
  by <rredman@imagin.net>
Organmaster Shoes
  by <Justinhartz@aol.com>
Re: Organmaster Shoes
  by <JSPBen@aol.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Sad news: Billy Nalle From: "M. W. Belcher" <littlebayus@yahoo.com> Date: Wed, 8 Jun 2005 12:06:49 -0700 (PDT)   Greetings!   I had the pleasure of receiving a very nice, kind letter from Mr. Nalle when I made inquiry with him re: the music used on CBS TVs' show, "Mama," starring Peggy Wood... plus Robin Morgan, Lars Hansen, and others... Mr. Nalle was the organist for that series... his contributions were on a Hammond organ, I believe...   He even told me not only what Kalmus edition of Grieg's music to consult, but also the price... and um... how to pronounce his surname!   He really welcomed my letter, and was so glad that someone even remembered the "Mama" series on TV.   A fine, musically very able gentleman, who will be sorely missed... RIP.   Best wishes to all,     Morton Belcher fellow list member...   --- Tim Bovard <tmbovard@earthlink.net> wrote:   > Dear Pipechatters, > > The following notice appeared on the Theatre Organ > List, and I forward it > here for your information. > > --Tim > ------------------------------------------------------------------ > > Friends: > > It's with great sadness that I report that Organist, > Billy Nalle passed away > this weekend here in his home town, Fort Myers. I > think he was born in 1925 > or 1923 (but I'm not really sure) > > Billy's career is too large to attempt to list it > all here. I met him via > my friend Walter Draughon in about 1983 and had the > opportunity to see and > play the New York Paramount Wurlitzer in its new > home in > Whicata. Billy retired > to Fort Myers and lived just up the street from me. > I often saw his lime > green pants at the grocery store and found his Honda > Civic 1977 parked in the > parking lot. > > Those of you that are PLUGGED in via email to other > organists may pass this > info along as you see fit. > > Stephen Brittain > > > > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital > organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> > >     __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around http://mail.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: A Tale of Three Manuals (xposted) From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Wed, 08 Jun 2005 16:13:46 -0400   In 1913 the Liberty Theatre, Seattle, acquired Wurlitzer Hope-Jones Unit Orchestra of that year. Fourteen ranks. Opus 41. Full toy counter, of course.   In the early 1950s, the theatre was to be razed. Jim Lokken (whom some = know from other lists) and I, classmates, tried to get our class to obtain the organ as our Class Gift (1955). Nobody was interested. So we all went = our various ways: seminary, other grad schools, U.S. Army/NavyAir Force, = etc..   But in summer 1955, a few other students picked up the challenge, and obtained the beast, and hauled it down to the PLC/PLU campus in Tacoma and stacked it in storage until campus organist R. Byard Fritts (father of = then toddler Paul Fritts) returned from sabbatical and installed it above the basketball court in the gym, to the great delight of many in succeeding years.   Eventually, the gym was razed, and the organ went to a church in Spokane.   Photo of console (sent to me by gracious courtesy of John Shanahan) available on request.   Alan  
(back) Subject: OHS Convention July 12-18 Brockton, Mass. From: "William T. Van Pelt" <bill@organsociety.org> Date: Wed, 8 Jun 2005 16:18:38 -0400   Early registration ends for the OHS convention on June 15 (seven days = hence) after which the fee rises, and the hotel registration deadline is June 19, after which the room rate may increase if any rooms remain available.   Registration information is available at http://www.organsociety.org/2005/registration.html along with the = schedule, pictures of the organs, and much more information. As well, there is information about the hotel and how to make reservations there.   This year's convention features organs built as early as 1834 and as recently as 1991. Most are 19th-century and pre-WWII organs. The earliest is believed to have been the first organ that Elias and George Hook built for a church. One of the more fascinating is an entirely restored 1911 E. = M. Skinner 3m which Lorenz Maycher will play, he having convinced the church = of its superlative value when they were considering jettisoning it (or, at least rebuilding it beyond recognition).   Another gem is the 1859 E. & G. G. Hook 3m relocated and restored for a mid-20th century Lutheran Church building in North Easton from a Lutheran Church in downtown Boston (which now has a new building containing a Richards, Fowkes & Co. organ, the Hook being too large to fit). Kevin = Birch will play it for us.   The spectacular interior of St. Anthony's in New Bedford, bedecked with a phalanx of gigantic angels and other eye-popping ornaments, has a huge = 1912 Casavant 4m that had fallen to nearly unplayable condition. The prospect = of the Organ Historical Society bringing people from all over the U. S. to = hear it led the church to authorize expenditures to put it into playable condition, for which we are very grateful. They are, too, now that = they've heard it! Timothy Smith will play it for us on Monday, July 18.   The last Jardine organ, built in 1899 for St. Thomas Episcopal Church in Taunton, Mass., will be played by Tom Murray on Friday, July 16. In 1899, the tubular-pneumatic Jardine replaced the previous electric Hope-Jones which seriously damaged the church when its circuits overheated and = started a large fire. The Jardine was designed and built under the supervision of the British organbuilder Carlton Michell who is best known as a builder of the Grove organ at Tewksbury Abbey in England.   Bill    
(back) Subject: Dobson at Verizon Hall (was WNC) (X-post) From: "Harry Martenas" <harry.martenas@gmail.com> Date: Wed, 8 Jun 2005 16:46:00 -0400   After the recent discussion of plans at the Washington National Cathedral, I visited the websites of Fisk and Dobson, since the cathedral has "...contracted C.B. Fisk and Dobson Pipe Organ Builders to help develop the visual design aspect of the presentation."   Regarding the WNC, I am not qualified to debate the issue, other than to observe that the WNC has been working with people at the absolute top of their fields:   Jack Bethards (Schoenstein & Co.) and Joseph Dzeda (A. Thompson-Allen Co.), two of the most widely respected builders and restorers of EP romantic/orchestral/symphonic organs;   Consultants Jonathan Ambrosino and Ian Bell - internationally respected for their comprehensive knowledge of American and British organ building, respectively;   And now Fisk and Dobson are going to study the visual aspects. Both firms are highly respected for both classically-inclined mechanical action instruments, and for full-blown romantic instruments on an enormous scale (think Myerson Center, LA Cathedral).   I simply don't understand the need to second guess this panel of experts. They constitute an enormous amount of expertise and theoretical knowledge of EP, mechanical action, American, English, cathedral, and concert organs. I am happy to wait and see what they come up with before I dismiss it. These people have examined the current instrument, and apparently agree that a major rebuild/recasting is needed, along with another instrument for the opposite end of this vast space. I am quite satisfied that they know what they are doing, and will do it well.   Back to Dobson - while on their site, I looked at two sets of pictures, and recommend them to everyone.   http://www.dobsonorgan.com/html/instruments/op76_construction.html shows construction photos of their instrument for Verizon Hall in Philadelphia. For those who equate tracker action with shrill, squeaking neo-baroque organs - look at the size of those windchests! Look at the scale of the pipework. Swell boxes as large as some NYC apartments. A wooden 32' Contre Bombard that extends 3 notes into the 64' octave. 5 16's on the manuals. I rather doubt this will squeak.   http://www.dobsonorgan.com/html/instruments/op76_console.html shows the construction of the magnificent dual (one mechanical, one electrical) consoles. I honestly cannot say which is more striking, impressive, or elegantly designed. I simply don't know what words to use.   This is artistry, design, and construction of the highest order.=20   My admiration goes out to Lynn Dobson and his firm - and I am quite content that they will be involved is examining the visual possibilities for the instrument(s) at Washington National Cathedral.   Harry Martenas Bloomsburg, PA  
(back) Subject: Re: OHS Convention July 12-18 Brockton, Mass. From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net> Date: Wed, 8 Jun 2005 16:31:41 -0500   Are you going to register? Remember I have registered for the 14th., = 15th. & 16th. of July, Thurs - Sat. You had better put in the notes box that = you are married to me and that I am a member and registered previously. Or would you like me to register you? Not long to the deadline after which = the registration goes up.   John. ----- Original Message ----- From: "William T. Van Pelt" <bill@organsociety.org> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org>; "PIPORG-L" <PIPORG-L@listserv.albany.edu> Sent: Wednesday, June 08, 2005 3:18 PM Subject: OHS Convention July 12-18 Brockton, Mass.     > Early registration ends for the OHS convention on June 15 (seven days hence) > after which the fee rises, and the hotel registration deadline is June = 19, > after which the room rate may increase if any rooms remain available. > > Registration information is available at > http://www.organsociety.org/2005/registration.html along with the schedule, > pictures of the organs, and much more information. As well, there is > information about the hotel and how to make reservations there. > > This year's convention features organs built as early as 1834 and as > recently as 1991. Most are 19th-century and pre-WWII organs. The = earliest > is believed to have been the first organ that Elias and George Hook = built > for a church. One of the more fascinating is an entirely restored 1911 = E. M. > Skinner 3m which Lorenz Maycher will play, he having convinced the = church of > its superlative value when they were considering jettisoning it (or, at > least rebuilding it beyond recognition). > > Another gem is the 1859 E. & G. G. Hook 3m relocated and restored for a > mid-20th century Lutheran Church building in North Easton from a = Lutheran > Church in downtown Boston (which now has a new building containing a > Richards, Fowkes & Co. organ, the Hook being too large to fit). Kevin Birch > will play it for us. > > The spectacular interior of St. Anthony's in New Bedford, bedecked with = a > phalanx of gigantic angels and other eye-popping ornaments, has a huge 1912 > Casavant 4m that had fallen to nearly unplayable condition. The = prospect of > the Organ Historical Society bringing people from all over the U. S. to hear > it led the church to authorize expenditures to put it into playable > condition, for which we are very grateful. They are, too, now that they've > heard it! Timothy Smith will play it for us on Monday, July 18. > > The last Jardine organ, built in 1899 for St. Thomas Episcopal Church in > Taunton, Mass., will be played by Tom Murray on Friday, July 16. In = 1899, > the tubular-pneumatic Jardine replaced the previous electric Hope-Jones > which seriously damaged the church when its circuits overheated and started > a large fire. The Jardine was designed and built under the supervision = of > the British organbuilder Carlton Michell who is best known as a builder = of > the Grove organ at Tewksbury Abbey in England. > > Bill > > > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> > >      
(back) Subject: Re: Looking for Reger and Dupre From: <RMaryman@aol.com> Date: Wed, 8 Jun 2005 17:30:31 EDT   In a message dated 6/7/2005 8:47:50 PM Eastern Standard Time, gksjd85@direcway.com writes: Did Reger write anything else along the lines of his 'Benedictus' worthy of learning and playing? my favorite piece to play by Reger - which is sort of, bot not 'zactly = like the Benedictus is the Ave Maria (op. 80?). it is on D-flat in a very slow = 6/8, and has a GORGEOUS cromatic ending.   Rick in VA  
(back) Subject: Tin Pest, et cetera From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Wed, 8 Jun 2005 17:35:06 EDT   I just returned from Padova where I photographed some serious Tin Pest = in some ancient organ pipes being restored at the Ruffatti workshop. They are =   undertaking the most conservative of consolidation techniques, the type of = work one would see in museum conservation work, favoring government standards = for preservation above what some organists might insist upon for cosmetic = vanity or the chronic need for "newness." I am in the process of writing an article that one of the journals = asked me to prepare on metal deterioration in organ pipes. It will not be a = simple task to cover the subject accurately, concisely, or completely. Like Bronze Disease in the sculpture conservation community, Zinc = Disease and Tin Pest are subjects of ongoing research, as to both the physical and =   chemical issues.   Sebastian M. Gluck New York City  
(back) Subject: Re: OHS Convention July 12-18 Brockton, Mass. From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net> Date: Wed, 8 Jun 2005 16:41:10 -0500   My apologies for this message, which was intended as a private note to my wife and got sent to the list by mistake.   John Speller   ----- Original Message ----- From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Wednesday, June 08, 2005 4:31 PM Subject: Re: OHS Convention July 12-18 Brockton, Mass.     > Are you going to register? Remember I have registered for the 14th., 15th. > & 16th. of July, Thurs - Sat. You had better put in the notes box that you > are married to me and that I am a member and registered previously. Or > would you like me to register you? Not long to the deadline after which the > registration goes up. > > John.      
(back) Subject: new Bach ms. found From: "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> Date: Wed, 8 Jun 2005 17:54:07 -0400   News flash:   Unknown J.S. Bach composition found - - - - - - - - - - - - By Stephen Graham   June 8, 2005 | Berlin -- Experts have discovered a previously unknown work by Johann Sebastian Bach in documents taken from a German library shortly before it was heavily damaged by fire, researchers said Wednesday. It was believed to be the first new Bach work to surface in 30 years.   Researcher Michael Maul found the aria, dated October 1713, in May in the eastern city of Weimar, the Bach Archiv foundation said on its Web site. There was no doubt about the authenticity of the handwritten, two- page score, the Leipzig-based foundation said.   Maul said it was the first Bach work to come to light since 1975, when a copy of the "Goldberg Variations" in a private collection was found to contain extra canons for piano in the composer's own handwriting. The last previously unknown vocal work by Bach to surface was in 1935, when the single-movement cantata fragment "Bekennen will ich seinen Namen" was discovered, the foundation said.     Gee, I guess they kinda forgot about the Neumeister Chorales discovered in 1985, huh? Or do organ works not count?   Randy Runyon    
(back) Subject: Flashy Patriotic From: "Daniel Hancock" <dhancock@brpae.com> Date: Wed, 8 Jun 2005 17:34:22 -0500     >I already am familiar with: the John Knowles Paine variations on the=20 >Star Spangled Banner, the Wilbur Held variations on "America" in the=20 >Fall Festivals book, the Dudley Buck SSB variations.   >Anybody have recommendations for a flashy patriotic encore piece?   >Thanks, >Chuck Peery >St. Louis     For flashy and short, I'd recommend the Virgil Fox arrangement, which is also accessible.   Daniel Hancock Springfield, Missouri  
(back) Subject: Re: Deteriorating Organ Pipes From: "firman1" <firman1@prodigy.net> Date: Wed, 8 Jun 2005 18:42:16 -0500   As a restorer of antique musical boxes of both the cylinder and disc type, = I have seen "lead disease" on some makes of boxes but not others. Lead was used underneath the comb teeth to give enough mass for the bass notes. On most boxes it is still shiny or dull, but some have just rotted away requiring replacement. It has been attributed to a "bad batch" of lead....meaning impurities. Pot metal parts, too, in player pianos "grow" overtime with internal corrosion.   Could it be the lead, not the tin, that is causing the problem? Berley A. Firmin II      
(back) Subject: Re: OHS Convention July 12-18 Brockton, Mass. From: "Jim McFarland" <mcfarland6@juno.com> Date: Wed, 8 Jun 2005 19:46:49 -0400     On Wed, 8 Jun 2005 16:31:41 -0500 "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net> writes: > Are you going to register? Remember I have registered for the 14th., > 15th. > & 16th. of July, Thurs - Sat. You had better put in the notes box > that you > are married to me     John:   Thanks for the good news. I was wondering when you two were going to tie the knot.   Jim  
(back) Subject: Re: Tin Pest, et cetera From: "Jim McFarland" <mcfarland6@juno.com> Date: Wed, 8 Jun 2005 19:56:12 -0400       Dear Seb:   I have found all of this to be very interesting. From some of the earliest articles to appear, I have come to understand the problem as follows:   The concern in Europe is that the current problem is not "tin pest" (caused by low temperature) but rather something else. It is also my understanding that the current effect can be measured in a 400 year-old organ or a 40-year old instrument and that the rate of deterioration is the same in both instances. (As though both instruments were built at the same time.)   This surely points to the problem being something other than contaminants from the time of the casting of the metal.   I am certainly looking forward to your updates on this issue. Please keep us all informed.     Jim  
(back) Subject: patriotic number From: "Dennis Steckley" <kzrev@rr1.net> Date: Wed, 8 Jun 2005 19:28:41 -0500   I vote for Ives, Variations on American-if the organ (and organist!) is suitable for the bubbly, bouncing humor of the piece; I got my copy from OHS. For my money, the definitive performance is by Virgil Fox on the great Wichita Wurlitzer-oh, such fun!! Dennis Steckley For I am possessed of a cat, surpassing in beauty, from whom I take occasion to bless Almighty God.  
(back) Subject: RE: patriotic number From: "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Thu, 9 Jun 2005 12:49:26 +1200   > vote for Ives, Variations on American-if the organ (and organist!) is suitable for the bubbly, bouncing humor of the piece; I got my copy from OHS. For my money, the definitive performance is by Virgil Fox on the = great Wichita Wurlitzer-oh, such fun!! How is E.Power Biggs's recording of this regarded? I treasure my copy, autographed for me and given by Biggs himself upwards of 30 years ago. = Even the sound of the organ seems familiar - colourful and remarkably = expressive like a lot of late 19thc instruments both side of the Atlantic ditch.   When people say they hate Victorian organ, I tell them that there was a great deal of good in Victorian instruments - and that the period = 1850-1900 was a far better period than 1900-1950 for tone and quality of materials.   Ross    
(back) Subject: Is it just me? From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Wed, 08 Jun 2005 19:59:59 -0500   I've momentarily despaired of learning my Franck selections all the way through (too much work and not enough time to concentrate, so I get about 2/3 of the way through without problems, but don't seem to progress at the climactic point). But don't worry - the bug will strike again, and I carry around my volume, thinking about the recent thread relating to learning the hardest pages first. And I also realize that one shouldn't quit at the point of the block, but should keep working through the block.   In the meantime, I am making myself work on:   Bach Toccata Adagio and Fugue in C (problem =3D latter part of fugue) Reger Benedictus (problem =3D making it seamless) Durufle Fugue on the Theme of the Carillon of Soissons (problem =3D last two pages)   The question: are these pieces hard, or is it just me? I'm having trouble lately wrapping my mind around them, so some days the fingers flow and some days they don't. Most of you know what is included in my repertoire, so we're speaking relative to my ability or lack thereof.   They don't strike me as overly difficult, just moderately. I chose them as things I really need to learn, things I have enjoyed hearing others do, and items not requiring the dexterity of larger works. They are kind of like grapefruit juice - supposed to be good for me. And I don't mind them - I like them (same with grapefruit juice, with the right condiments of vodka and a salt-rimmed glass). But for some reason I'm just having the worst time developing a new practice routine and concentration. So - is it just me?   I'm going to see my doctor for a checkup tomorrow, and wanted to let him know so that he could check for Alzheimer's, menopause, mental illness of various genres, whatever.   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com          
(back) Subject: are the masterworks "difficult?" From: "Randy Terry" <randy@peacham.homeip.net> Date: Wed, 8 Jun 2005 18:11:20 -0700   I've been scolded by professors before when I would say something "isn't that difficult."   I'm talking about such pieces at the Fantasia & Fugue in g Minor of Bach, the Dupre Cortege et Litanie, and major works by Vierne, Franck, Widor, = et. al.   Once you've learned to play a piece, it doesn't seem difficult any more, = and to be sure, there are masterworks that are well within the grasp of the average well-trained organist.   We should all remember however, that just because we can play it, doesn't mean it is easy. After 20+ years of playing the organ, I have to remind myself that I may actually have LEARNED something in all that time!   Glenda - when I study a work and get stuck or bored, I often find that if = I just totally stay away from a keyboard for a week or two, things begin to work again after a break. Happy playing!   +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ Randy Terry Music Minister The Episcopal Church of St. Peter Redwood City, California        
(back) Subject: Re: channeling trumpets, again From: <rredman@imagin.net> Date: Wed, 8 Jun 2005 21:46:22 -0500 (CDT)     >Yes, it will work, but reed makers should be told, and might provide slightly thinner than normal tongues. Roy Redman >> > Not at all sure. But EP unit actions is an option. But the option I > want to eliminate first is... would a trumpet be happy on offset > toeholes in the toeboard of a slider chest. If so, that's the best > option. > Andy > > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> > >    
(back) Subject: Organmaster Shoes From: <Justinhartz@aol.com> Date: Wed, 8 Jun 2005 22:56:50 EDT   I have a new organ student, and I directed her to the Organmaster = Shoes website for "Mary Jane" style Organmasters. She told me the site came up in a foreign language. I just got in from teaching, typed in www.organmaster.com, and lo and behold, the website is in Korean! Organmaster Korea must be upscale, for the site features Gucci, = Hermes, Louis Vuitton and Chanel! I wonder if they have an Ethel Smith Model? This is no joke. Check it out!   Cheers,   Justin  
(back) Subject: Re: Organmaster Shoes From: <JSPBen@aol.com> Date: Wed, 8 Jun 2005 22:58:50 EDT   In a message dated 6/8/2005 9:57:20 PM Central Daylight Time, Justinhartz@aol.com writes:   I have a new organ student, and I directed her to the Organmaster Shoes website for "Mary Jane" style Organmasters. She told me the site came up in a foreign language.       try _http://www.organmastershoes.com/_ (http://www.organmastershoes.com/) John B.