PipeChat Digest #5398 - Thursday, June 9, 2005
 
Re: Organmaster Shoes
  by <Gfc234@aol.com>
Re: Organmaster Shoes
  by "Richard Hazelip" <rhazelip1@yahoo.com>
RE: OHS Convention July 12-18 Brockton, Mass.
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
Re:Organmaster shoes
  by <Justinhartz@aol.com>
RE: are the masterworks "difficult?"
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
Re: Organmaster Shoes
  by "Jan Nijhuis" <nijhuis.jan@gmail.com>
Re: Organmaster shoes
  by "Jan Nijhuis" <nijhuis.jan@gmail.com>
Re: English influence on early American organs
  by "Rev. Tony Newnham" <organist.tony@btinternet.com>
Re: Tin Pest, et cetera
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: PipeChat Digest #5397 - 06/08/05
  by "John Foss" <harkat@kat.forthnet.gr>
Re: English influence on early American organs
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: Tin Pest, et cetera
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Organmaster Shoes From: <Gfc234@aol.com> Date: Wed, 8 Jun 2005 23:00:01 EDT     In a message dated 6/8/05 9:57:20 PM, Justinhartz@aol.com writes:     > =A0 =A0 I have a new organ student, and I directed her to the Organmaster=20= Shoes > website for "Mary Jane" style Organmasters. > =A0 =A0 She told me the site came up in a foreign language. > =A0 =A0 I just got in from teaching, typed in www.organmaster.com, and lo=20= and > behold, the website is in Korean! > =A0 =A0 Organmaster Korea must be upscale, for the site features Gucci, He= rmes, > Louis Vuitton and Chanel! > =A0 =A0 I wonder if they have an Ethel Smith Model? > =A0 =A0 This is no joke. Check it out! >=20   Justin! That is a riot! Most of the Korean organists I know are exquisitely=20 dressed! Anyhoo-the site for our American Organmasters is Organmastershoes= ..com.   Cheers-and LOL gfc :)       Gregory F. Ceurvorst 1921 Sherman Ave. #GS Evanston, IL 60201 847.332.2788 home/fax 708.243.2549 mobile gfc234@aol.com gfc234@nextel.blackberry.net    
(back) Subject: Re: Organmaster Shoes From: "Richard Hazelip" <rhazelip1@yahoo.com> Date: Wed, 8 Jun 2005 20:44:33 -0700 (PDT)   FWIW I typed organmaster shoes into my search bar and got the regular = site. No Korean or anything. rh   Justinhartz@aol.com wrote: I have a new organ student, and I directed her to the Organmaster Shoes website for "Mary Jane" style Organmasters. She told me the site came up in a foreign language. I just got in from teaching, typed in www.organmaster.com, and lo and behold, the website is in Korean! Organmaster Korea must be upscale, for the site features Gucci, Hermes, Louis Vuitton and Chanel! I wonder if they have an Ethel Smith Model? This is no joke. Check it out!   Cheers,   Justin   ****************************************************************** "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org List-Subscribe: List-Digest: List-Unsubscribe:     --------------------------------- Discover Yahoo! Find restaurants, movies, travel & more fun for the weekend. Check it = out!
(back) Subject: RE: OHS Convention July 12-18 Brockton, Mass. From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Wed, 08 Jun 2005 23:18:17 -0500   Thanks, John, for explaining that one. I was trying to figure out that plot. Bigamist organbuilder/organist caught at convention - gotta work on it.   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com     -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of John L. Speller Sent: Wednesday, June 08, 2005 4:41 PM To: PipeChat Subject: Re: OHS Convention July 12-18 Brockton, Mass.   My apologies for this message, which was intended as a private note to my wife and got sent to the list by mistake.          
(back) Subject: Re:Organmaster shoes From: <Justinhartz@aol.com> Date: Thu, 9 Jun 2005 00:20:22 EDT   Thanks. That worked, but the Korean site is much more interesting :) Perhaps organists in Korea are paid better than in the USA since they have = a wide variety of designer options!   Cheers,   Justin  
(back) Subject: RE: are the masterworks "difficult?" From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Wed, 08 Jun 2005 23:32:27 -0500   Thanks, Randy, for the advice. It does work to lay off a week.   My only problem is that if I miss one day of practice, it turns into three. And playing organ is one of the few 'sitting' activities I can do without pain in my back, for some reason. I thought I just pulled muscles a couple weeks ago, but guess I'll end up finally seeing one of dem dere kyropracters to find out what I did.   Looking for a pool guy trained in the art of deep massage,   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com     -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of Randy Terry     We should all remember however, that just because we can play it, doesn't mean it is easy. After 20+ years of playing the organ, I have to remind myself that I may actually have LEARNED something in all that time!   Glenda - when I study a work and get stuck or bored, I often find that if I just totally stay away from a keyboard for a week or two, things begin to work again after a break. Happy playing!          
(back) Subject: Re: Organmaster Shoes From: "Jan Nijhuis" <nijhuis.jan@gmail.com> Date: Wed, 8 Jun 2005 21:36:59 -0700   I must say the Korean site is prettier than the U.S. site.   So who is Hugh Fred? and why are the display typefaces and the link names in English? ... so many questions ... haven't found a man's shoe there (yet).   Eh, they probably woudn't have them in a 13 anyway.=20   On 6/8/05, Richard Hazelip <rhazelip1@yahoo.com> wrote: > FWIW I typed organmaster shoes into my search bar and got the regular sit= e. No Korean or anything. >=20 > rh >=20 > Justinhartz@aol.com wrote: > I have a new organ student, and I directed her to the Organmaster Shoes > website for "Mary Jane" style Organmasters. > She told me the site came up in a foreign language. > I just got in from teaching, typed in www.organmaster.com, and lo and > behold, the website is in Korean! > Organmaster Korea must be upscale, for the site features Gucci, Hermes, > Louis Vuitton and Chanel! > I wonder if they have an Ethel Smith Model? > This is no joke. Check it out! >=20 > Cheers, >=20 > Justin >=20 > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: > List-Digest: > List-Unsubscribe: >=20 >=20 >=20 > --------------------------------- > Discover Yahoo! > Find restaurants, movies, travel & more fun for the weekend. Check it ou= t! > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> >=20 >=20     --=20 Jan Nijhuis nijhuis.jan@gmail.com  
(back) Subject: Re: Organmaster shoes From: "Jan Nijhuis" <nijhuis.jan@gmail.com> Date: Wed, 8 Jun 2005 21:46:44 -0700   How long before the "organ comittee" decides to choose between a three manual Hyundai or Daewoo console?     On 6/8/05, Justinhartz@aol.com <Justinhartz@aol.com> wrote: > Thanks. > That worked, but the Korean site is much more interesting :) > Perhaps organists in Korea are paid better than in the USA since they hav= e a > wide variety of designer options! >=20 > Cheers, >=20 > Justin   --=20 Jan Nijhuis nijhuis.jan@gmail.com  
(back) Subject: Re: English influence on early American organs From: "Rev. Tony Newnham" <organist.tony@btinternet.com> Date: Thu, 9 Jun 2005 08:24:33 +0100   Hi   Stephen Bicknell in his book "The History of the English Organ" reveals a number of successive traditions of organ building - but, to my mind, the significant historical periods are what could perhaps be termed the "Classical English Organ" - i.e. GG compass manuals, short compass swell = (if it's there at all on earlier examples) and no, or very rudimentary, = pedals. I like the music of this period - but there are only a few organs of this type left - we have a "transitional" example in the chamber organ in my current church.   As you say, the changes, due mainly to the Schulz influence - and as far = as I can see, influenced initially by the Hull-based firm of Forster and Andrews, led to the c-compass, reasonable pedal departments (eventually!) = in the mid 1800's. The rapid development was fuelled by the huge numbers of new churches and capels being built - especially in the then new = industrial cities - at this period, leading to a corresponding big demand for new organs - and helped, no doubt, by the Victorians interest in new and "scientific" developments. It's this period that saw the development, if not invention, of pneumatic and electric actions, etc. Nicholas Thistlethwaite's book "The Making of the Victorian Organ" makes a fascinating read - and there a fair number of relatively untouched organs = of this era around.   Although, especially if the F&A proposition is correct, the changes = started in the North, they were quickly taken up by Lewis et al and spread South very quickly.   Yes - there was a Jardine connection to the USA IIRC - I'd have to look up =   exactly what - and I don't have time at present! I think that other = English builders also emigrated, or at least worked for a time, across the pond.   As to influence in the USA - my knowledge in that area is somewhat limited = - so I won't comment on it!   Every Blessing   Tony ----- Original Message ----- From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Wednesday, June 08, 2005 6:40 PM Subject: Re: English influence on early American organs     > Hello, > <SNIP>> > Although the Echo division on the English style of > instrument was eventually replaced by a Swell; the > tonal differences between a typically English organ of > 1750 and one built in 1840 would have been quite > small; save for maybe a pedal register or two at 16ft, > but only normally down to low G (10.2/3ft). > > There was a dramatic seed-change in the style of > organ-building associated with William Hill, the > organist Dr Gauntlett of the Congregational Church > tradition and their discussion with Mendelssohn. This > resulted in the "German-style" of British > organ-building, which emerged around 1845 or so, which > resulted in some remarkable instruments being built > with C-compass manuals and pedals, as well as a degree > of independence for the pedal divisions. One of the > most remarkable was the organ of Great George Street, > Congregational Church, Liverpool, which (thanks to > Henry Willis IV) I played after the closure of the > building. <SNIP> > Now, wasn't there a Jardine connection in the US? > > Jardine in the UK, were based near to Liverpool, in > the city of Manchester....only about 25 miles away.... > so far as I am aware. > > It was the North of England, rather than the South, > which was most influenced by the German-style, and > this undoubtedly reached a pinnacle with the building > of the great Schulze organs circa.1857 at Doncaster, > Leeds, Newcastle (Tyne Dock) and Wigan. > > That same Schulze influence was the influence on T.C. > Lewis and, by default, on G.Donald Harrison, who > admired the Lewis style of chorus-work. > <SNIP>> I guess that's as clear as a muddy pool! > > Regards, > > Colin Mitchell UK >    
(back) Subject: Re: Tin Pest, et cetera From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Thu, 9 Jun 2005 00:46:49 -0700 (PDT)   Hello Sebastian,   I may have my uses after all, should you find the "tin pest" subject difficult to fathom.   My brother is a top-flight metallurgist, and knows all there is to know about most things to do with metal.   Let me know if you find yourself struggling.   From what bit I know of the subject, there seem to be remarkable regional variations, due to the relative purity or impurity of the tin. I suppose the difficult bit is knowing whether such impurities react with the host metal electrostatically, chemically or at all. It could be to do with humidity, temperature, chemical pollutants or any number of things.   I wish you well, but fear that you have taken on a steep mountain.   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK   --- TubaMagna@aol.com wrote:   > I just returned from Padova where I photographed > some serious Tin Pest > > I am in the process of writing an article that > one of the journals asked for.... > me to prepare on metal deterioration   __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around http://mail.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Re: PipeChat Digest #5397 - 06/08/05 From: "John Foss" <harkat@kat.forthnet.gr> Date: Thu, 9 Jun 2005 10:58:03 +0300   gksjd85@direcway.com writes: Did Reger write anything else along the lines of his 'Benedictus' worthy of learning and playing?   About 40 years ago I had a book of 12 pieces by Reger op 59 published in 1901 which , in addition to the Benedictus in D flat, included a Toccata = in D minor and a Fugue in D major. Though not written as a single work, they = go well either together or separately. They are quite short and manageable. I =   played them at the opening recital of St Mary of Eton, Hackney Wick on the =   new II/36, Grant Degens and Bradbeer organ in 1965 which this year celebrates its 40th birthday. Did anyone go to Jane Parker Smith's recital =   to mark the occasion? I will be in London next month and hope to visit a = few organs from that period to see how they have fared with time!   John Foss http://www.organsandorganistsonline.com/ http://launch.groups.yahoo.com/group/orgofftop/      
(back) Subject: Re: English influence on early American organs From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Thu, 9 Jun 2005 01:11:28 -0700 (PDT)   Hello,   I have a funny feeling that the first example of pneumatic action was by Booth of Wakefield circa.1827?   It was actually an inflating "puff bellow" which lightened the touch of the keys.   And should anyone think that remarkably early, then consider the "Jaquard Loom," invented right at the end of the 18th century, but patented circa.1801 or 1802.   Put a pneumatic action and a Jaquard Loom punch-card mechanism together, and you get the amazing machinery which represents the automatic, folding-card mechanism of the Fair (Band) Organs.   Electric action.....erm....who was the first?   Was it a Belgian invention initially, as used very unreliably by Aneesens? (Molls patent?)   There were some clever people about then, just as there are now.   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK     --- "Rev. Tony Newnham"   > Hi > It's this period that > saw the development, if > not invention, of pneumatic and electric actions, > etc.   __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around http://mail.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Re: Tin Pest, et cetera From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Thu, 9 Jun 2005 04:15:20 EDT   Colin:   IMHO samples of this metal should be turned over to a person who knows metal and can analyze it. A person like your brother whom you mentioned. This will give ideas as to the content of the metal and the resulting oxides and salts if any.It appears that the problem is environmental It could be many things, but war was fought in these places in the last 50-60 years. I'm assuming Cordite from the bombs, and natural moisture could be a probable cause. Clouds of this smoke went everywhere. At least my theory rather coincides with the onset of these problems. It could also be somehow electrostatic too. I've noticed that some pipe metals seem to vibrate by lightly rubbing with the back of the fingers. TV rabbit ears do that connected to the TV or not. I know that may be a stretch, but to solve the problem we need to try a lot of things to nail it down. I noticed this phenomenon in recent pictures of the Monaco Cathedral organ facade pipes. We need to figure out the what and how that causes this, and possible solutions.   Just a thought.   Ron Severin