PipeChat Digest #5401 - Saturday, June 11, 2005
 
Child Friendly Organ Music
  by "Thomas/Patricia Gregory" <tgregory@speeddial.net>
Nancianne Parrella at St. Ig 5-1-05
  by "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net>
Re: controlling slider pallets with electric action
  by <rredman@imagin.net>
Re: controlling slider pallets with electric action
  by <rredman@imagin.net>
Pipechat
  by "Daniel Hopkins" <danielwh@ns.sympatico.ca>
Foot fetish?
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
Re: Foot fetish?
  by <DERREINETOR@aol.com>
Re: Foot fetish?
  by "nelson denton" <ndenton@cogeco.ca>
Re: Foot fetish?
  by "Jan Nijhuis" <nijhuis.jan@gmail.com>
Re: Foot fetish?
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Organs and Organists Online update June 11th
  by "John Foss" <harkat@kat.forthnet.gr>
 

(back) Subject: Child Friendly Organ Music From: "Thomas/Patricia Gregory" <tgregory@speeddial.net> Date: Fri, 10 Jun 2005 15:09:45 -0500   A few years ago a fellow list member sent me a copy of Niven's "Willo the Wisp".     The moving 16th notes remind me the "invasion of the yellow jackets" which would take place every summer in our sanctuary.   Best wishes,   Tom Gregory Thomas and Patricia Gregory Waukesha WI USA    
(back) Subject: Nancianne Parrella at St. Ig 5-1-05 From: "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net> Date: Fri, 10 Jun 2005 22:31:11 -0400   Nancianne Parrella at St. Ignatius Loyola, New York, May 1st, 2005   Settling into a creaky pew in this stunning 1898 church, where I feel so much at home, and opening up the handsome program booklet, chock full of information, one knows immediately that this church and its music staff, when it comes to Organ recitals (and anything else they present), means serious business. Memories of the occasion, plus Cleveland Kersh's program =   notes, commissioned for the event, cause one to never, ever, throw away a St. Ignatius program! I have a box thereof, duly marked.   So, I have opened now to the program page, which, when showing the bill of =   fare for a Parrella concert always reminds one of the great care that goes =   into her programming. It is a special skill to be able to program a consistently telling 90 minutes or so of Organ music, including things we know and love, and music this performer teaches us to love anew.   First thing on the program, the great Bach "Piece d'Orgue," and perhaps 40 =   years ago, you'd have said, the WHAT? Then, the person to whom you'd have said WHAT? will have played you the opening bars, and you'd have said, = "Oh, you mean the "Fantasy in G Major," and if really sharp, you'd have added: "572!" Well, Pi=E8ce d'Orgue might, in fact, have surprised (and pleased) Bach, but it is not the name by which he or his friends knew it. He bears some responsibility in having used French tempo markings almost uniquely = in this work, the opening marking being <tr=E8s vitement.> As Mr. Kersh = reminds us, Bach, who had made a hand copy of the de Grigny <Premiere Livre = d'Orgue,> was well-acquainted with things French. As for the name <Pi=E8ce d'Orgue> = I recall that it appeared almost suddenly on the scene, and my Googling has determined that the name originated with Kenneth Gilbert and other editors =   of the Neue Bach Gesellschaft, published during the first half of the 20th =   century. I am not sure in what year between 1900 and 1950 the Organ music became available in the new editions. At that moment, and not a moment later, <Pi=E8ce d'Orgue> became the "Lingua Franca" of those "in the = know." I eventually joined the group. (In my student days, 50s, early 60s, with certain Bach works with significant differences, the drill was to look in the first Bach Gesellschaft, and do a comparison with the Peters Edition (Griepenkerl and Roitzsch - via el cheapo Kalmus), and play what seemed best, this with watchful input from Fenner Douglass, who was my teacher then.   In any case, back to the Organ loft, from which we heard a wonderfully coherent performance of this most complex work. It cannot be played = without complete dexterity, and I have heard it many times with dexterity and dexterity alone. A superb understanding of touch, articulation leading to clarity, and a certain subtlety and flexibility are requirements that can illuminate a performance of this magnificent work. Ms Parrella's performance, possessing all of that, was the perfect beginning to this marvelous (and otherwise French) program!   As hinted above, after the Bach, all further pieces were by French composers, beginning with Jacques Boyvin (ca. 1649-1706), who was born = about 20 years earlier than Marchand (whose music Bach copied and thus knew = well) and Francois Couperin. All three are part of a common practice period, rooted in the music of the Roman Catholic Church. All wrote works based on =   the church tones. Boyvin presided at the famous Francois Henri Clicquot Organ at Notre Dame Cathedral in Rouen. Of him, we heard two pieces from Organ masses, one on the 2nd tone and another on the 3rd. The first, <Dialogue de R=E9cits,> makes use of the elegant and abundant r=E9cit = sounds on this instrument. The second, <Grand Dialogue a 4 Choeurs,> gave ample = scope to the batteries of reeds along with other chorus sounds. Ornaments-R-Us here, and these were all executed with a fluid grace.   If we have had a course in music history somewhere, we will have studied = the group, "Les Six." Georges Auric, Louis Durey, Arthur Honegger, Darius Milhaud, Francis Poulenc, Germaine Tailleferre. Erik Satie, whose daring ideas really inspired this group in their thinking, was not really counted =   as one of <Les Six>. Organ music? A little, from Honegger, Milhaud, = Poulenc (only the wonderful concerto), and the only woman in the group, Germaine Tailleferre (1892-1983). Tailleferre, who was a prodigious pianist as a child, like all the others in the group, left us very little for Organ. I love this about her: According to John Henderson, Tailleferre was in = Widor's Organ class until Widor dismissed her for wanting to improvise in the = style of Stravinsky! In any case, she did leave us a Nocturne of 1977, a = gorgeous, gentle piece which we heard this evening. Somewhat deflating for us as Organists (not really) is the news from Dr. Henderson that Nocturne is actually Tailleferre's own transcription of a composition of her own for wind ensemble. We'll take it, anyway.   Next, we heard the Franck Pi=E8ce Heroique, and all I am able to say is = that Ms Parrella's performance took me back to another performance of the same work many years ago that was so electrifying that I have remembered it clearly to this day. It was in a concert by Jeanne Demessieux at Woolsey Hall in the late 50s or early 60s. It was so exciting that as she moved toward the grand finale, the audience somehow spontaneously rose to their feet with excitement. The St. Ignatius audience is a bit more reserved, = not in their appreciation but in not being quite so demonstrative. The loud clapping went on for quite a time. It was brilliant, even minus = Demessieux's spike heels!   At Oberlin, where attendance at student recitals was required each Wednesday, part of the wisdom of this requirement was realized as we Organ =   students absorbed a knowledge of a lot of literature for instruments other =   than the Organ. I began my lifetime enthusiasm for the Cesar Franck work = for piano, "Prelude, Choral, and Fugue." I am haunted from time to time by the =   beautiful Choral. A few years after Oberlin, I chanced to hear the same = work at Wigmore Hall in London, played by Clifford Curzon. What an experience. = I guess T. Tertius Noble, late of St. Thomas' Church, Fifth Avenue, was similarly addicted, and did a transcription for Organ of just the Choral, which we heard this evening. Nancianne gave it every attention - it is = clear that she belongs to our little band of the elect - but frankly, I do not think the transcription works. The Choral played on a gorgeous piano in a fine room, the chordal accompaniment arpeggiated with melody held - well, there is nothing quite like it. Registrations were beautiful this evening, =   but I guess, for me, the Organ is, in this case, not a suitable medium for = a transcription of this piece. It is, nonetheless, extremely interesting to = me that the transcription exists, and that Tertius Noble (and this evening's recitalist) loved this piece also.   From the Langlais Suite Br=E8ve of 1947, Nancianne chose <Dialogue sur les =   Mixtures,> a wonderful and intricate confection. Mr. Kersh suggests that = in the building of this program, there is perhaps a logic and kinship here connecting the Suite Br=E8ve of Langlais with the two suites of Boyvin, = and, for that matter, with the great body of other such Organ Mass suites, = which tend to ally a registration with each component of the suite. Here, the Langlais does just that in the first and last parts of the suite, the = first piece called simply Grand Jeux, and last piece, Dialogue on the Mixtures, again fitting the pattern. I think it is a neat idea. I would, with considerable trepidation, take exception to Mr. Kersh's seeing in this = piece a "predominantly martial character." I feel there is at least an element =   of "Jocularity" to consider.   Herewith followed a remarkably ethereal performance of <Rorate Coeli> of Jeanne Demessieux. I thought at the time, so ethereal that it seemed to = put me under in a deep trance, and I felt that maybe, so entranced was I, that = I really had not heard the piece at all. Weird, huh?* I emerged to hear the unmistakable beginning of Naiades, of Vierne, from the fourth set of the Pieces de Fantasie, written between 1926 and 1927. In this performance, = the little water nymphs were kept bouncing along, in something of an endurance =   test not unlike some Chopin Etudes, played here with complete ease.   The program closed with two movements of the Vierne Fourth Symphony, 4. Romance, and 5. Final. Ms. Parrella is one who can play these great Symphonic movements in the French Romantic style, with great sweep and panache, and this she did on this occasion, using the Organ wonderfully in =   what was one of its favorite missions. The Romance is an unusual work of stunning beauty, and the exciting Final brought this grand program to an exciting close. *As for the Demessieux Rorate Coeli, I was doing my worry beads about = that, asking myself if I had somehow slept through it. Feeling very silly, I approached Ms. Parrella following the program and asked: "This may be a strange question, but did you actually play Rorate Coeli?" A yes answer means I committed the sacrilege of falling asleep during her concert, something I could never willingly do. Well, the answer was a quizzical = "yes, I am sure I played it, I think I did," like, why am I asking such a thing. = I can't say with what gratitude I received a phone call later in the = evening. After Nancianne and her husband Jo arrived home, he said: "How come you = did not play the Demessieux?" We had a great laugh about that, and one hopes that Rorate Coeli will have a place in the next recital program.   Malcolm Wechsler, still decompressing from a great evening of music! www.mander-organs.com                                  
(back) Subject: Re: controlling slider pallets with electric action From: <rredman@imagin.net> Date: Fri, 10 Jun 2005 22:03:00 -0500 (CDT)   >The last we heard, the Synchordia company had moved to Switzerland, and done an organ there. Check the archives for postings about it. I do not think the idea has been given up, but the difficulty in influencing pipe speech lies in precise control of the first 1/2 mm, or so, of pallet opening. Most servo systems I have seen to date will imitate half key depression etc. but any speech control is already over by then. I am sure good electric control will be accomplished in time, and personally encourage those working on this to keep on trying! Roy Redman   I haven't heard any recent rumors about a system that would give some > control of pallet velocity on slider chests using electric pulldowns. > Has everyone given up this undertaking? > > It would sure be nice for places that don't have the physical layout for > real tracker action but would like the added sensitivity. > Now that electronic organ companies have developed "tracker > sensitivity".... > > > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> > >    
(back) Subject: Re: controlling slider pallets with electric action From: <rredman@imagin.net> Date: Fri, 10 Jun 2005 22:03:00 -0500 (CDT)   >The last we heard, the Synchordia company had moved to Switzerland, and done an organ there. Check the archives for postings about it. I do not think the idea has been given up, but the difficulty in influencing pipe speech lies in precise control of the first 1/2 mm, or so, of pallet opening. Most servo systems I have seen to date will imitate half key depression etc. but any speech control is already over by then. I am sure good electric control will be accomplished in time, and personally encourage those working on this to keep on trying! Roy Redman   I haven't heard any recent rumors about a system that would give some > control of pallet velocity on slider chests using electric pulldowns. > Has everyone given up this undertaking? > > It would sure be nice for places that don't have the physical layout for > real tracker action but would like the added sensitivity. > Now that electronic organ companies have developed "tracker > sensitivity".... > > > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> > >    
(back) Subject: Pipechat From: "Daniel Hopkins" <danielwh@ns.sympatico.ca> Date: Sat, 11 Jun 2005 00:03:42 -0300   Is hte server down for Pipechat, I cant get in using the web or IRC Danielwh    
(back) Subject: Foot fetish? From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Fri, 10 Jun 2005 23:20:59 -0500   I just got this wisp of an idea for a new story. It's rough. What do you think?   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com   Prologue   "Detective, we just received a 9-1-1 call from St. Peter's Episcopal Church downtown. The priest was asking for an ambulance and police."   The call galvanized Max Barnett out of his somnolence. Sitting up in bed, he knocked over a book from his chest, turned on the bedside lamp and looked at the clock. Only 10:00 - he must have crashed. Coming off a week of midnight on-call will do that to one, he thought ruefully. "How long ago?"   "Maybe 10 minutes," the voice of the dispatcher responded. "We've dispatched EMTs and two units there. When I called the Chief, he asked for you to meet him there. He knows the priest personally."   "I'm on my way," Max was terse as he hung up.   Quickly he slipped into some Dockers and a fresh oxford shirt, and hastily picked up his gun, badge and cell phone as he soothingly told the excited Australian shepherd dog to stay put and let himself out the door. Within minutes he was speeding down the interstate toward the middle of the city.   His phone rang. "Barnett here," he answered, recognizing the Chief's number on his caller ID.   "How soon before you get here?" Chief Tagert's voice sounded tired.   "I'm just now hitting the exit, and can be there in two or less," Barnett answered. "What's up?"   "A homicide in the church," was the tense answer. "The scene borders on the bizarre. I'll wait until you get here to fill you in - you can see for yourself."   Max was pulling up. There was the usual redundant rescue team, always in the way but never of much use. The EMTs were escorting a gurney out, a body encased in black body bag. One recognized Max and nodded toward the church. "They're still working on one inside."   Max nodded and made his way past some onlookers. There was a cop guarding the entrance, and he waved Max inside. "The Chief is up front - he said for you to go on up."   Max nodded and made his way down the long center aisle of the dimly lit nave to the choir area. There he found EMTs kneeling on the floor over a body. As his eyes narrowed in the brighter light, he noted that the figure on the floor was petite, a woman, and she was thrashing about in pain as one of the technicians tried to restrain her.   "Lady, be still so that we can try to stop the bleeding," he pleaded with her. "We need to get you to the hospital quickly."   As Max looked on, her eyes fluttered wildly. "Don't let him kill me," she moaned, clutching the technician's arm in seeming panic.   "Lady, he ain't going to be killing you or anyone else," the tech replied earnestly.   Max felt a tug at his arm. Looking around, he saw Chief Tagert, who pulled him away from the sight. Walking a few feet away to the altar, he came to a man in a priest's collar, a small, wiry man in his sixties, who was gazing on the scene.   "Detective Max Barnett, this is Father Blackwell. He is the one who found her and called 9-1-1."   Max solemnly shook hands with the priest, who was concernedly watching the woman on the floor. The chief continued, "Father, tell Max here what you were telling me."   The priest, his eyes not leaving the woman, replied, his voice cracking. "I was on my way home from giving a parishioner last rites at the hospital. I noted the lights on, and guessed that Melanie was here practicing, as she usually does at night." He paused. "She's the organist here. So I decided to stop and speak to her.   "When I made it in here, I noticed there was no music playing. I saw her car outside, and thought it odd. When I came closer to the organ, I heard moaning. That's when I found her and - and him."   "Him?" Max interrupted. The EMTs had lifted the woman onto a stretcher and was slowly moving with her.   "Yes," the priest was nervous. "He was lying over her. He was - dead."   "Did you know him?"   "Never saw him before in my life," the priest shook his head.   "Do you know how he died?" Max couldn't help himself, as the EMTs moved toward the door with the patient.   "Melanie was holding a gun." The priest paused. "She apparently shot him. There was a small machete-looking knife beside the man's body." His eyes filled with tears. "There was blood everywhere, but it looked as if he had tried to sever her feet from her body."                
(back) Subject: Re: Foot fetish? From: <DERREINETOR@aol.com> Date: Sat, 11 Jun 2005 00:58:53 EDT   Glenda,   I can't wait for the punchline.......   "as he soothingly told the excited Australian shepherd dog to stay put and let himself out the door."   We love Aussies in our family. My folks have had Australian Shepherds for years. SMART DOGS.   Pax, Bill H. SJE Boston  
(back) Subject: Re: Foot fetish? From: "nelson denton" <ndenton@cogeco.ca> Date: Sat, 11 Jun 2005 01:01:53 -0400   Hmmm Max the barefoot cop seems mighty suspicious.   Or the other possibility is that somebody was wearing their street shoes while practicing their heel and toe methods.   The victim was the organ tuner. His "weapon" was a tuning wand. The preist never recognized him because the modern clergy never go into = the church except for services. Hence he never met the tuner.       P.S My Darling Glenda I've told you this before! When we are off together snuggled up sharing a bottle in the blower room = and I tell you something secret about me. You are NOT supposed to repeat it publicly Even if I am very fascinating   xoxoxox N.    
(back) Subject: Re: Foot fetish? From: "Jan Nijhuis" <nijhuis.jan@gmail.com> Date: Fri, 10 Jun 2005 22:54:16 -0700   Chop-chop ... not half-bad!   On 6/10/05, Glenda <gksjd85@direcway.com> wrote: > I just got this wisp of an idea for a new story. It's rough. What do > you think? >=20 > Glenda Sutton > gksjd85@direcway.com >=20 > Prologue >=20 > "Detective, we just received a 9-1-1 call from St. Peter's Episcopal > Church downtown. The priest was asking for an ambulance and police." >=20 > The call galvanized Max Barnett out of his somnolence. Sitting up in > bed, he knocked over a book from his chest, turned on the bedside lamp > and looked at the clock. Only 10:00 - he must have crashed. Coming off > a week of midnight on-call will do that to one, he thought ruefully. > "How long ago?"   <snip>=20     --=20 Jan Nijhuis nijhuis.jan@gmail.com  
(back) Subject: Re: Foot fetish? From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Sat, 11 Jun 2005 00:56:21 -0700 (PDT)   Hello,   The things people will do just to get a pair of "organ-masters" for free!   My only question, is why a perfectly good organist's who-dunnit has to include a priest.   I don't recall that the Fr.Brown mysteries ever featured an organist!!   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK       --- Glenda <gksjd85@direcway.com> wrote:   > I just got this wisp of an idea for a new story. > It's rough. What do > you think?     __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around http://mail.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Organs and Organists Online update June 11th From: "John Foss" <harkat@kat.forthnet.gr> Date: Sat, 11 Jun 2005 11:26:32 +0300   ORGANS AND ORGANISTS ONLINE : http://www.organsandorganistsonline.com/       We have a couple of New Additions from young organists this week - John Kristian Fjellestad improvising a Toccata on the IV/132 Steinmeyer organ = in Nidaros Cathedral - fabulous playing and a wonderful sound from Norway's largest instrument in the hands of a highly skilled young musician. Exuberant Tubas and real 32' Bombardes - none of your electronic fakes here - robust choruses and bright mixtures!       15 year old Jared Grenz is soloist in the Trumpet Tune in D major by Henry =   Purcell accompanied by his father, Timothy Grenz, on the III/40 Holtkamp Organ in the 1st Congregational United Church of Christ, Eau Claire, WI.       The "Eklektika" recital from our archives features the artistry of David M =   Patrick. David is playing French music by Grison, Widor, Vierne, Guilmant and Gigout on the IV/58 Hill, Norman and Beard organ of Gloucester Cathedral, restored in 1999 by Nicholsons of Malvern, and the IV/74 Walker =   organ (1952) in Buckfast Abbey, Devon, England. Ralph Downes was = consultant to both these instruments. The Guilmant and Gigout works are recorded on the III/62 2000 Van den Heuvel Organ in the Katarina Church, Stockholm, Sweden.   Established as a leading International recitalist with an impressive discography and broadcasting career, David M Patrick's performances = display virtuoso technique, rhythmic vitality and profound musical understanding.       We have added two new interesting links to the site - firstly the Vermont Organ Academy website at http://www.vermontorganacademy.com/ In an era = where it seems that many colleges are cutting back on their organ performance courses it is highly encouraging to see a new institution appear on the scene. Another new member, Norwegian organist and trumpeter, Ken Goran Mikkelsen http://www.ken-g.nu/ has aslo sent us details of his site. Ken lives near Tromso, which is within the Arctic Circle and the Land of the Midnight Sun. As is very clear from our contributors, Norway has a flourishing organ culture! He is a member of an instrumental group and his =   site includes photographs of churches and organs as well as a photo of Ken =   himself driving a sled pulled by a team of Huskies.       John Foss   http://www.organsandorganistsonline.com/ http://launch.groups.yahoo.com/group/orgofftop/