PipeChat Digest #5430 - Thursday, June 30, 2005
 
Re: ministry vs. job
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: ministry vs. job
  by "Rev. Tony Newnham" <organist.tony@btinternet.com>
"New" Hinners
  by "Dennis" <kzrev@rr1.net>
Re: PipeChat   Service literature/music/preluds
  by <hydrant@baskerbeagles.com>
Re: ministry vs. job
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: ministry vs. job
  by <DERREINETOR@aol.com>
XPosted - New organ for St. Andrew's Anglican, Winnipeg, Canada
  by "Russ Greene" <rggreene2@shaw.ca>
snaredrum effect
  by <blueeyedbear@aol.com>
RE: XPosted - New organ for St. Andrew's Anglican, Winnipeg, Canada
  by "Douglas Henn-Macrae" <douglas@henn-macrae.com>
Re: snaredrum effect
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
RE: XPosted - New organ for St. Andrew's Anglican, Winnipeg, Canada
  by "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
RE: snaredrum effect
  by "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
CZECH ORGAN CULTURE - (THE RESTART) - PART 1
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Optimum editions of the repertoire
  by "Desiree'" <nicemusica@yahoo.com>
Re: ministry vs. job
  by "Rev. Tony Newnham" <organist.tony@btinternet.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: ministry vs. job From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Wed, 29 Jun 2005 08:35:04 -0700 (PDT)   Hello,   OK....I'm a rotten church organist because I never read the Bible!   Read it....found it badly flawed and highly contrived....moved on to reading music books instead.   Regards,   Colin MItchell UK     --- "Rev. Tony Newnham" >   > When is a church organist a bad organist? > > > > A: When he doesn't read the Bible > > I thoroughly agree!!!       ____________________________________________________ Yahoo! Sports Rekindle the Rivalries. Sign up for Fantasy Football http://football.fantasysports.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Re: ministry vs. job From: "Rev. Tony Newnham" <organist.tony@btinternet.com> Date: Wed, 29 Jun 2005 16:55:04 +0100   Hi Colin   Maybe it's time you gave the Bible another try!   Every Blessing   Tony ----- Original Message ----- From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Wednesday, June 29, 2005 4:35 PM Subject: Re: ministry vs. job     > Hello, > > OK....I'm a rotten church organist because I never > read the Bible!    
(back) Subject: "New" Hinners From: "Dennis" <kzrev@rr1.net> Date: Wed, 29 Jun 2005 11:43:23 -0500   I was fortunate yesterday........I am moving to accept a new pastoral = call, and I stopped by my new church..........when I was there earlier the sanctuary was being renovated and the organ was sealed off.   But they have a lovely 2 manual and flat pedal Hinners Tracker Organ = that is somewhere around 1900 or earlier--and it is loved as well as lovely! I = only had about five minutes there, and I'll report at greater length. It is basically unaltered.   Rev. Dennis A. Steckley Don't cry because it's over. Smile because it happened. --Dr. Seuss        
(back) Subject: Re: PipeChat Service literature/music/preluds From: <hydrant@baskerbeagles.com> Date: Wed, 29 Jun 2005 14:29:01 -0400     >From: "Emily Adams" <eadams@cinci.rr.com> >Date: Tue, 28 Jun 2005 08:17:42 -0400 > >>From Glenda: "...there is a world of good music suitable for church out there of varying degrees of difficulty and capabilities just crying to be used.">>   >Amen! My technical proficiency certainly limits what I'm able to work up in a week's time....>   Throughout my career, by example from William Barnard at Christ Church Cathedral--Houston TX, I have devoted most of my practice time to learning literature. Regardless of what you learn, it's a good start to greater achievement. The slow movements from sonatas are an excellent starting point. Even the slow movements from Hindemith are pretty accessible!   Look at even larger works, such as the Franck Chorales. The a-minor contains two beautiful slow movements, and the b- minor as well. The E-major is contains even more goodies.   A Bach prelude and fugue can be edited down to a few minutes by learning beginning and concluding sections. When you've conquered that, you have a beautiful piece to play for a prelude as well as a good start to learning great literature. The Widor and Vierne finale pieces are also ripe for editing.   Additionally, it's important to repeat these pieces so that they not only become your favorites but favorites of the congregation also. If people only hear a piece every year or more, how will they ever grow to like it.   One other thing I really work on when improvising or playing literature is exploring the complete resources of the organ. Every 8, 4 or 2 stop is a potential solo stop. Some pieces, especially fugues, are lovely when played on a 4' flute, even with tremolo!! Explore.... explore...   Scritchies and Haruffaroo-bahawow... Bruce and the Baskerbeagles   HowlingAcres http://www.baskerbeagles.com Natural products for pets & people http://www.naturalzone.biz  
(back) Subject: Re: ministry vs. job From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Wed, 29 Jun 2005 13:09:00 -0700 (PDT)   Hello,   What?   Miss out on "pipechat", "organofftopic" and "The Simpsons?"   NEVER!! Life is too short!!   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK   --- "Rev. Tony Newnham" <organist.tony@btinternet.com> wrote:   > Hi Colin > > Maybe it's time you gave the Bible another try! >       ____________________________________________________ Yahoo! Sports Rekindle the Rivalries. Sign up for Fantasy Football http://football.fantasysports.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Re: ministry vs. job From: <DERREINETOR@aol.com> Date: Wed, 29 Jun 2005 16:34:30 EDT   Dear Glenda and list,   I tend to agree with you, Glenda. At my church, we do not use the term "Minister of Music", or anything approaching it, though it is pretty = clear--from my cassock and surplice to my role in shaping liturgy--that as Organist and Choirmaster, I am a "minister".   At St. John's, we start with liturgy when it comes to every move we make. Organ literature is actually an afterthought. In fact, one of my = predecessors--a very well respected pedagogue and concert organist--got into a great deal = of hot water when he tried to put an organ project ahead of a leaky roof!   "Ministry" as a musician, in my opinion, is a complex thing. It takes a = great deal of effort in being liturgically appropriate, enforcing the terms of one's contract, and being integrated into the life of the Parish. Things = to avoid: "Biblical Idolatry" (forgetting that the Church predates the Canon of Scripture and thus worshipping the Scriptures in an unhealthy way), = Evangelical zeal, and indeed, "Bach worship".   It's all about balance, prayer, and a decent vigilance to protect your own =   job. Someday, I'll write a book.   Pax, BH SJE Boston.        
(back) Subject: XPosted - New organ for St. Andrew's Anglican, Winnipeg, Canada From: "Russ Greene" <rggreene2@shaw.ca> Date: Wed, 29 Jun 2005 16:12:28 -0500   Well, my organ committee reviewed our parish survey last night and we have overwhelming support to replace our aging Allen.   We're looking at a 3-manual digital instrument, mid-sized at around the 55-60 stop mark to support our extensive choral and concert programs. Quite a bit of research has been done and a budget established which has produced the following candidates (alphabetical by maker):   Ahlborn-Galanti 3200   Allen Quantum 345   Phoenix Custom III/60   Rodgers Trillium 958   Allen and Rodgers have local dealer support; AG and Phoenix dealers are in the Toronto area, about 1,200 miles away.   I'd love to get opinions from those of you who have had positive or negative experiences with these makers, particularly with models comparable to those under consideration.   There isn't a lot of point telling me to get a pipe organ. We have no space for pipes. We're not willing to buy a used organ and install it ourselves even if we did have space. We don't want a one-manual tracker. We can't afford a new pipe organ of reasonable size. Etc. Etc. Etc. We've been all over this option and it just isn't for us as much as I love the dream. We've also looked at trying to squeeze a Copeman Hart or a Walker into our budget - smaller spec than we'd like and still too pricey for us.   We do want to get the best possible digital, within our budget constraints and music program requirements.   Having said that, my committee and I would really value any input list members are willing to give on which of these instruments, or other similar-size, similar price instruments, would be our best choice.   Thanks to all, Russ Greene   Organist & Choirmaster St. Andrew's Anglican Church (Woodhaven) Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada  
(back) Subject: snaredrum effect From: <blueeyedbear@aol.com> Date: Wed, 29 Jun 2005 18:56:51 -0400   can someone tell me how to approximate the effect of a snaredrum on an = organ with no percussion (other than chimes)? it will basically accompany = a piccolo-like melody. thanks, scot  
(back) Subject: RE: XPosted - New organ for St. Andrew's Anglican, Winnipeg, Canada From: "Douglas Henn-Macrae" <douglas@henn-macrae.com> Date: Wed, 29 Jun 2005 23:56:31 +0100   If a newcomer may be allowed his two-pennyworth -   I have heard Allens, including a recent installation in London, and was = not over-impressed. I have not heard Ahlborn or Rodgers, so cannot comment tonally on those, except to say that from the catalogues I have seen recently, Rodgers look incredibly expensive (in Europe, at least) - the Trillium 958 is listed at 70,000 Euros / approx 50,000 pounds, and for that you only get illuminated push-pull "drawstops". Having heard two large - but fairly different - Phoenix instruments a = couple of weeks ago, my money would go to them without a moment's hesitation, = based on both quality and price (over here you would probably pay roughly half = the price of the equivalent Rodgers, and get proper moving drawstops and excellent personal service).   If you weren't so far away I would also heartily recommend Hugh Banton (of The Organ Workshop in Lymm, Cheshire) who does incredible things with "Bradford" hardware (ie synthesis, not sampling).   I would go for the small independents over the mass-producers any time.   Best wishes,   Douglas. (Rochester, UK)   -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org]On Behalf Of = Russ Greene Sent: 29 June 2005 22:12 To: Electronic List; Pipechat List; Piporg List Subject: XPosted - New organ for St. Andrew's Anglican, Winnipeg, Canada   Well, my organ committee reviewed our parish survey last night and we have overwhelming support to replace our aging Allen.   We're looking at a 3-manual digital instrument, mid-sized at around the 55-60 stop mark to support our extensive choral and concert programs. Quite a bit of research has been done and a budget established which has produced the following candidates (alphabetical by maker):   Ahlborn-Galanti 3200   Allen Quantum 345   Phoenix Custom III/60   Rodgers Trillium 958   Allen and Rodgers have local dealer support; AG and Phoenix dealers are in the Toronto area, about 1,200 miles away.   I'd love to get opinions from those of you who have had positive or negative experiences with these makers, particularly with models comparable to those under consideration.   There isn't a lot of point telling me to get a pipe organ. We have no space for pipes. We're not willing to buy a used organ and install it ourselves even if we did have space. We don't want a one-manual tracker. We can't afford a new pipe organ of reasonable size. Etc. Etc. Etc. We've been all over this option and it just isn't for us as much as I love the dream. We've also looked at trying to squeeze a Copeman Hart or a Walker into our budget - smaller spec than we'd like and still too pricey for us.   We do want to get the best possible digital, within our budget constraints and music program requirements.   Having said that, my committee and I would really value any input list members are willing to give on which of these instruments, or other similar-size, similar price instruments, would be our best choice.   Thanks to all, Russ Greene   Organist & Choirmaster St. Andrew's Anglican Church (Woodhaven) Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada   ****************************************************************** "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org>      
(back) Subject: Re: snaredrum effect From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Wed, 29 Jun 2005 16:09:58 -0700 (PDT)   Hello,   Coudn't you buy a snare drum second-hand?   It would be a whole lot easier!   Theatre organs use a rather clever device, but this involves a real drum. I forget exactly, but I seem to recall escaping wind used as a snare-drum effect on certain theatre instruments.   With my imagination running in overdrive, I could only possibly conceive the use of a keen string register, with the hand(s) slapping numerous keys to produce a sort of sizzly, enharmonic noise rather than specific musical notes.   Anyone know any better?   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK   --- blueeyedbear@aol.com wrote:   > can someone tell me how to approximate the effect of > a snaredrum on an organ with no percussion (other > than chimes)? it will basically accompany a > piccolo-like melody.     __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around http://mail.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: RE: XPosted - New organ for St. Andrew's Anglican, Winnipeg, Canada From: "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Thu, 30 Jun 2005 11:17:24 +1200   >Having heard two large - but fairly different - Phoenix instruments a couple of weeks ago, my money would go to them without a moment's hesitation   Even from CDs, the Phoenix certainly wins over the Allen and Rodgers = makes.   Ross    
(back) Subject: RE: snaredrum effect From: "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Thu, 30 Jun 2005 11:20:38 +1200     >With my imagination running in overdrive, I could only possibly conceive the use of a keen string register, with the hand(s) slapping numerous keys to produce a sort of sizzly, enharmonic noise rather than specific musical notes.   Oh I like it, Colin! Perhaps you should electrify that wee tracker of = yours and increase the wind pressure to 8" so you could install an 8ft Vile instead of the Mixture? If you did this, at least one parishioner might be found to praise the change.......   Ross    
(back) Subject: CZECH ORGAN CULTURE - (THE RESTART) - PART 1 From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Wed, 29 Jun 2005 20:34:15 -0700 (PDT)   CZECH ORGANS AND ORGAN MUSIC (Part One) (revised)   Hello,     No sooner had I begun, in a previous posting, to take the usual time-line of organ history in the Czech Republic, than I discovered that it simply wouldn't work as it did with the organ traditions of Poland and Hungary; largely due to a lack of readily available information from this interesting part of Europe. However, I was aware of the fact that the Czech region is rich in music, rich in historic organs, rich in brilliant performers and incredibly musically inventive for such a tiny country.   Before writing another word, perhaps we should consider the size of the Czech Republic, which now separated from Slovakia, is about the size of Scotland (just a wee bit bigger), with a population of a mere 10,000,000 people. Almost incredibly, this little country is able to list approximately 118 individual compositions or collections of works written for the organ in the second half of the 20th century!! Add to this, the fact that over 20,000 other musical compositions have been written between 1945 and 1985 in the Czech region, and we are on to something quite extraordinary. Should we be surprised to learn this?   The background to the present-day organ culture is based on a wonderful historic pedigree which can be traced back to the 15th century at least, and which has continued ever since. I should not have been surprised I suppose, for the Czech Republic has always been right at the centre of European musical art; the quality of composers, performers and institutions second to none, with Prague still one of the great cultural centres in world music. Because the heritage is so musically important, perhaps it might be best to start with a bit of a history lesson, if for no other reason than the fact that the names of old Czech composers are not quite household ones and do not exactly trip off the tongue, but often rank highly in the overall scheme of things.   One of the earliest known organs was that in St. Vitus Cathedral in Prague, finished in 1567 by the organ-builder from Ceske Budejovice, Jachym Rudner. The Jesuits were responsible for bringing organ and instrumental music into the church. Also important was the royal court ensemble during the reign of Rudolph II, when the conductor was Phillipe de Monte (1526-1564) the composer of numerous masses, motets and madrigals. Other noble households also encouraged good music and ensembles, but alongside this, was the ever delightful music of Czech Folk Song, which so inspired the major composers of later generations, such as Smetana. During the Renaissance period, the most important composers were:-   Philippe de Monte 1521 - 1603 Jacobus Gallus 1550 - 1591 Krystof Harant of Polzice 1564 - 1621 Jan Vencalek 1598 - ?   During the reign of Matthias, the Imperial Ensemble (the royal court ensemble) moved, lock, stock and barrel to Vienna, and only turned up in the Czech lands for big, court celebrations. Consequently, the new centre of musical life during the baroque era were those connected with the Bishops of Olomouc Karel Lichtenstein Kastelkorn (1664 - 1695) and Schrattenbach (1711 - 1738). The two musical groups associated with them, were based in Kromeriz and Olomouc, but alongside the strengthening classical-music baroque tradition, there also grew a wealth of secular music; even within the monasteries. Opera came to Bohemia for the first time in the year 1627 during the coronation of Ferdinand II.   Of the early baroque composers in the Czech region, the name of Adam Michna z Otradovic (1600- 1676) is significant, but it was the two later composers, Zelenka and Cernohorsky, who are best known to-day.   In the 18th century, the great traveloguer and musician, Charles Burney, declared that the Czech region was "the conservatory of Europe."   Zden=ECk =8Aest=E1k wrote of the small town called Citoliby, next to Louny, in northern Bohemia, where in the late 18th century, seven composers of stature emerged, in a town comprising of one castle, one church and about sixty houses!!   The organ repertoire from the 18th century is highly significant and often of high quality; a few examples of which are notable:-.   Jan Zach (1699-1773): Prelude & Fugue in c Josef Seger (1716-1782): Fugue in f Frantisek Xavier Brixi (1732-1771): Toccata & Fugue in a Jan Krittel Vanhal (1739-1813): Fugue in C Karel Blazej Kopriva (1756-1785): Pastorale Prelude & Fugue Anon: Fugue in F   Bohuslav Matej Cernohorsky (1684-1742):   Two organ fugues, in D Major, and d minor Two organ fugues, in g-sharp minor, and c minor Toccata in C Major & Fugue in a minor   The interesting thing about many of these compositions, is the fact that they are more baroque in style than classical for the most part; the Czech region being something of a late starter and finisher in the baroque musical style.   Three organ concertos of great interest have also emerged in my search of Czech music, which sound quite wonderful to my ears. These are as follows:-   Brixi, Franti=9Aek Xaver   Koncert in C Koncert D-dur Koncert F-dur     Jan Dismas Zelenka (1679 - 1745) came from Lounovice pod Blanikem, after studying in Vienna and Italy. His unique melodic and rhythmic inventiveness make his music quite different to that of Germany or Italy, and the Czech character of the music is unmistakable. Highly praised y both Telemann and J S Bach, Zelenka wrote with a superb contrapuntal technique, making him a very fine composer indeed..   Bohuslav Matej Cernohorsky (1684 - 1742) was born in Nymburk, but his history remains a little obscure and few works of his survive. Nevertheless, he wrote the splendid motet "Laudetur Jesus Christus" (A grandiose vocal fugue with organ accompaniment), the "Regina coeli" a concert cantata and several pieces for organ, including fugues and toccatas. Although little is known of him, a whole school of composition is connected with his example, and includes the names of the composers Seger, Zach and Tuma.   Of the three pupils/disciples, the name of Josef Seger (1716 - 1782) was the most significant.   What of the old organs in the Czech lands, and do they still exist?   One of the most important foundations was Osek monastery, a Cistercian foundation founded in 1208, which became a great centre of learning, with a wonderful library, an important collection of mineral exhibits, its own observatory and a fine musical tradition. Mixed fortunes, successive wars and the closure of the abbey after the second world-war (possibly due to the hostility and indifference of the communist regime) resulted in a fair degree of vandalism and plundering, but the abbey is once again functional and in the long process of restoration. The organ in the north oratory was built during the years 1714-1715 by Vaclav Starck. It was restored in 1995 (with the financial support of Chancellor Kohl) by the organ builder Vladimir =8Alajch and, according to an international specialist commission, is currently considered the finest restored Baroque organ in central Europe.   Here you see some truly beautiful images of the instrument as it is to-day; noting that the last photograph is a quite different instrument of 4-manuals at Velk=E9 :-   http://varhany.nomi.cz/setkani/bor%202003/Text/osek.htm   However, let us end this first part with some music, which can be heard at the filling URL:-   http://www.baroquecds.com/27Web.html   Here can be heard samples of some excellent organ and choral music from the Czech baroque period. (Click on the samples in red)   (To be continued.....)     Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK       PS: If there are any obvious errors, or if there are things which have been missed, I would welcome any comments from list-members.       __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around http://mail.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Optimum editions of the repertoire From: "Desiree'" <nicemusica@yahoo.com> Date: Wed, 29 Jun 2005 22:14:17 -0700 (PDT)   As I gear up for my JR. Recital, I am on the shopping binge for new scores = I don't have. I'm curious about something. What editions of the repertoire standards any listers have as favorites? Of course, one must consider those works that come in various editions. My favorite Bach...is good old Widor-Schweitzer...the OLD printings with = the grey covers. Big, legible, room for markings, no abstract markings = that fit the hands and feet of the editor only. I have been directed to close with the Franck Piece Heroique.I have learnd = the first few pages with the Dover Edition. BUT, the Schott/Urtext edition = is what's on the way to me. Its a very clean edition of Franck's Music = modern printing. Another thing about editions:I found helpful in getting started in the = Piece Heroique. And I kid you not...I went to the "Made Playable" Version = of Colin Hand to see what he "made playable" for certain passages. After = reding thru it, I went to the Dover Edition much more comfortably and = ready to tackle the piece. Particularly are the flourishes in the = dominant. In the Hand edition, they retain the complete notes that Franck = wrote, but they change the clef positions. For example, the F#-G# A = (dotted 8th, 16th, quarter) is written on the second staff, in bass clef = rather than bass clef on upper staff. That little smidge made going and = learning the original notes much easier. TDH   --------------------------------- Yahoo! Mail Stay connected, organized, and protected. Take the tour
(back) Subject: Re: ministry vs. job From: "Rev. Tony Newnham" <organist.tony@btinternet.com> Date: Thu, 30 Jun 2005 08:28:10 +0100   Hi   You really can't find 10 mins a day! That's all you need to read the = entire Bible in a year.   Every Blessing   Tony ----- Original Message ----- From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Wednesday, June 29, 2005 9:09 PM Subject: Re: ministry vs. job     > Hello, > > What? > > Miss out on "pipechat", "organofftopic" and "The > Simpsons?" > > NEVER!! Life is too short!! > > Regards, > > Colin Mitchell UK >