PipeChat Digest #5190 - Tuesday, March 1, 2005
 
Re: My recital from hell
  by "Harry Grove" <musicman@cottagemusic.co.uk>
Fisk dedication in Chicago
  by <RMB10@aol.com>
Re: My recital from hell
  by "N. Russotto" <ravenrockdesigns@gmail.com>
Re:Glenda's recital from hell
  by "Daniel Hancock" <dhancock@brpae.com>
the photographer from hell
  by "Daniel Hancock" <dhancock@brpae.com>
Re: music list for Sunday, Feb 27
  by "jonkroepel" <jonkroepel@insightbb.com>
Re: Fisk dedication in Chicago
  by "Robert Lind" <lindr@core.com>
Engines of Our Ingenuity - More
  by "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net>
Fisk dedication in Chicago - longer than it should be
  by "Michael David" <michaelandmaggy@comcast.net>
RE: Catholic vs non-catholic Ave Marias??
  by "Emmons, Paul" <PEMMONS@wcupa.edu>
RE: Holy Name Flentrop in Chicago
  by "Emmons, Paul" <PEMMONS@wcupa.edu>
Re: Fisk dedication in Chicago - longer than it should be
  by <Gfc234@aol.com>
RE: Fisk dedication in Chicago - longer than it should be
  by "Michael David" <michaelandmaggy@comcast.net>
RE: Holy Name Flentrop in Chicago
  by "Michael David" <michaelandmaggy@comcast.net>
Re: Fisk dedication in Chicago - longer than it should be
  by "N. Russotto" <ravenrockdesigns@gmail.com>
Re: WWBD
  by "Noel Stoutenburg" <mjolnir@ticnet.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: My recital from hell From: "Harry Grove" <musicman@cottagemusic.co.uk> Date: Tue, 1 Mar 2005 10:16:05 -0000   Isn't it IMPERATIVE that you find him - to give him your address - so that =   he can send you YOUR FEE for your Copyrighted performance - which he has recorded.   I double all my fees where sound or video is being taken.   Harry Grove [a.k.a. a professional musicman]     ----- Original Message ----- From: "cc" <belcanto@brainerd.net> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Monday, February 28, 2005 11:39 PM Subject: Re: My recital from hell     > What rudeness. I thought most photographers asked permission before > taking > photos or videos. Maybe they don't HAVE to ask, but most of the ones = I've > run across are polite enough to do so. Apparantly this "mystery" > photographer wasn't. >    
(back) Subject: Fisk dedication in Chicago From: <RMB10@aol.com> Date: Tue, 1 Mar 2005 07:50:49 EST   I keep hoping for someone to make a posting about the recital...I'm = anxious to hear a report about it.   Monty Bennett  
(back) Subject: Re: My recital from hell From: "N. Russotto" <ravenrockdesigns@gmail.com> Date: Tue, 1 Mar 2005 08:21:03 -0500   That's good advice, Harry! I wonder. . . . the recitals I give are usually "Nights of Improvisation" and I have the audience throw out sentences for me to improvise. . . is that still a copyrighted performance?   Nick     On Tue, 1 Mar 2005 10:16:05 -0000, Harry Grove <musicman@cottagemusic.co.uk> wrote: > Isn't it IMPERATIVE that you find him - to give him your address - so = that > he can send you YOUR FEE for your Copyrighted performance - which he has > recorded. > > I double all my fees where sound or video is being taken. > > Harry Grove > [a.k.a. a professional musicman] > > > ----- Original Message ----- > From: "cc" <belcanto@brainerd.net> > To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> > Sent: Monday, February 28, 2005 11:39 PM > Subject: Re: My recital from hell > > > What rudeness. I thought most photographers asked permission before > > taking > > photos or videos. Maybe they don't HAVE to ask, but most of the ones = I've > > run across are polite enough to do so. Apparantly this "mystery" > > photographer wasn't. > > > > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> > >     -- Nicholas F. Russotto Somers, Connecticut  
(back) Subject: Re:Glenda's recital from hell From: "Daniel Hancock" <dhancock@brpae.com> Date: Tue, 1 Mar 2005 08:43:01 -0600   Not to steal from your story, Glenda, but almost losing your nerve while the photographer "assaulted" you reminds me of a time when I was giving a recital program on a 1920's Austin in Carthage, Missouri. The request of the church was that the recital would open with a hymn, which I led. Upon releasing the last chord of the hymn, heard one note of the oboe (somewhere high in the register) sticking. Couldn't get it to stop (I even turned the organ on and off, and all those other useless motions an organist might make when they don't know how to deal with a malfunction) and that darn oboe note played nearly all the way through the recital. Twice, it distracted and shook me up enough that I thought about stopping and telling them to go home. But I persisted (albeit sometimes poorly!)and it finally quit about 15 minutes from the end of the program.   I suppose if I were Bach, I could have improvised a recital program around the sticking oboe note, even on a 1920's Skinneresque organ!   Daniel Hancock Springfield, Missouri  
(back) Subject: the photographer from hell From: "Daniel Hancock" <dhancock@brpae.com> Date: Tue, 1 Mar 2005 08:55:18 -0600   >Ah yes, the video photographer from hell! He must have relatives in=20 >upstate New York. At one recital I attended, the video guy -- complete=20 >with several bright spotlight -- walked up onstage to capture the=20 >moment. The organ console was detached, there was walking room around=20 >it, and since the organist's face wasn't going to be visible otherwise,   >the photographer walked around in back of the console, spotlights still   >blazing, and proceeded to fire away, blinding the organist in the=20 >process. At that point, the organist had no choice but to stop and=20 >invite the photographer to leave. The organist's recovery after such a   >harrowing experience was remarkable.   The "photographer from hell" also has other relatives, one in particular who is known as the "tourist from hell". The last sighting I had of her was during a recital at Ste Vincent de Paul, Paris (I believe it was accordion and organ - Francois-Henri Houbart and Bruno Maurice, and believe it or not, it was fantastic!). Anyhow, during the course of the recital she was to be found walking around the side aisles, and up across the sanctuary, many, many times, all the while looking up at the columns, light fixtures, windows, sculptures, and anything else she could fix on with a "knowledgeable" so she could impress us mere recital-goers who were stupidly content to sit on the bench and 'listen' (or maybe they were straight-back chairs). But regardless, it was irritating and quite distracting, not for the organist-who was in the rear gallery-but for those in attendance. Glaring did no good, because she never made eye-contact.   Also, beware of her distant relative, the "clapper from hell" who is known to loudly start the clapping upon the sounding of the last chord--sometimes long before the organist has lifted their hands and the attendees get to revel in the fading chords of the organ in a reverberant space.   Daniel Hancock Springfield, Missouri  
(back) Subject: Re: music list for Sunday, Feb 27 From: "jonkroepel" <jonkroepel@insightbb.com> Date: Tue, 1 Mar 2005 09:03:58 -0600       I am confused. Dom Paul Benoit arrangement is found on page 29, pieces d'orgue, published by John Fischer and Bro, catalog 8774, copyright MCMLIII, and is entitled "In the Love of Christ Jesus" or Ubi Caritas et Amor Deus Ibe Est ...   I am just curious why you wouldn't go to a simplified version of this = chant, such as a hymnal that contains the chant or out of the Liber? Benoit's arrangment does pose some metric challenges, and I can't see personally using this as the source of an improvisiation. While the chant is clear, =   Benoit has manipulated the rhythm and changed the chant slightly as well.   All this being said, I think that when we use "arrangments" of pieces, we = do it for various reasons: one, the piece it too hard for us; two, we are = too lazy to learn the notes of the orignial piece. I am not talking about transcriptions either or orchestral reductions. Why don't people want to take the time to actually learn a piece as written?   Don't get me wrong, I LOVE improvisations when they are well thought out.     Jon Kroepel     >I improvised upon a Chant Theme, more than a Catholic > theme. Where Charity and Love Prevail, by Dom Paul > Benoit. Actually, it could be both. > > No I was not at St. Chrysostoms. Other engagements > took my tme. I wanted to be there badly, however       -- No virus found in this outgoing message. Checked by AVG Anti-Virus. Version: 7.0.300 / Virus Database: 266.5.0 - Release Date: 2/25/2005    
(back) Subject: Re: Fisk dedication in Chicago From: "Robert Lind" <lindr@core.com> Date: Tue, 1 Mar 2005 09:45:32 -0600   I'm about to go to my church and won't be back until late afternoon at the earliest, and I hope that someone will do this. Do we need to take up a collection so that we can send Malcolm Wechsler to recitals all over the place to get his fine reviews?   Bob Lind   ----- Original Message ----- From: <RMB10@aol.com> To: <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Tuesday, March 01, 2005 6:50 AM Subject: Fisk dedication in Chicago     > I keep hoping for someone to make a posting about the recital...I'm anxious > to hear a report about it. > > Monty Bennett    
(back) Subject: Engines of Our Ingenuity - More From: "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net> Date: Tue, 1 Mar 2005 11:27:01 -0500   Dear Listmembers and Others,   I wrote yesterday to point out to you a brief radio program about the = Barker Lever and Cavaille-Coll that pleasantly shocked me when it appeared on NPR =   during "Morning Edition." The only time that sort of stuff appears on the public airways, it is accompanied by the soothing voice of Michael Barone. =   Yesterday morning, it was the also-soothing voice of John Lienhard of University of Houston, as part of a series of short documentaries produced =   by John and the University of Houston. I've often heard these programs, = but never discussing the Pipe Organ. Well, the series is called "The Engines = of Our Ingenuity," so why not Organs, Barker, and Cavaille-Coll?   I sent John Lienhard my postings to the lists, and he responded with a = list of four other programs he has done about Pipe Organs. Here is that list, = and when you click on those links, there will be an audio link so you can hear =   the program exactly as he has read it on the air. There is no music on = these other programs.   http://www.uh.edu/engines/epi530.htm - Texas Organbuilder Johann Wandke   http://www.uh.edu/engines/epi569.htm - Edward Link, builder of Theatre Organs and Flight Trainers!!   http://www.uh.edu/engines/epi1096.htm - Ktesibios and The Hydraulis   http://www.uh.edu/engines/epi632.htm - Niemecz's Barrel Organs - Niemecz = was appointed Court Librarian and created instruments for which Haydn wrote 32 =   pieces! Most of us will have only heard about two. Hidden treasures?   John Panning also wrote, with a list that meshes mostly with that of John Lienhard, and those who receive PipOrg-L will have seen this. John = Panning's list includes one other program, not strictly about the Organ, but = certainly of interest: http://www.uh.edu/engines/epi1584.htm - This is about the wonderful Hugo Distler.   I hope you will enjoy these. David Baharian is a good friend, and a blind Organist in Boston. He wrote to say how pleased he was to be able to hear the audio link. Well, here are some more for him, and for you all. You can =   write to John Lienhard at the address in the copy line above.   Malcolm Wechsler www.mander-organs.com        
(back) Subject: Fisk dedication in Chicago - longer than it should be From: "Michael David" <michaelandmaggy@comcast.net> Date: Tue, 1 Mar 2005 13:33:52 -0600   Well, I can't lay my hands on the program just now (I do, however, know where it is) but I can certainly offer a few opinions until Bob gets = back (or Malcolm surfaces).   The Fisk is the third organ in as many decades at St. Chrysostom's. The church is about two miles north of the center of Chicago in the posh = "Gold Coast" neighborhood, a short walk from the former Playboy mansion and = the RC Cardinal's mansion.   The church isn't large; 450 people would be very cozy. It's well-proportioned, the ceiling peaks at about 40' but when it's full, as = it was Sunday, there's little or no bloom to the sound.   When I played there back in the ?0's, there was a three manual Casavant = of perhaps 35 ranks from the 1930s in chambers above the divided chancel. = It wasn't anything spectacular but was probably something we would all appreciate more now than we did at the time.   Sometime in the early 80s, a large Moller (80 - 90 ranks) went in at the behest of the then organist who fancied himself a Messaien specialist. = I don't know where it all went, perhaps most of it was shoved up the bell tower.   The current organist (Richard Hoskins) arrived shortly thereafter and = had to cope with an organ totally unsuited for the space, any sort of coherent music making, and failing mechanical health. Hoskins had studied with = Roth and had brought him over for a recital on the Moller six or seven years = ago.   The Fisk is at the back of the church in a divided case straddling a = large window. The keydesk is in the left hand case as you face the rear (liturgical west end - geographic east end) of the church. I'm guessing that the (professional) choir now sings from there as there are chairs between the cases.   The fa=E7ade pipes are polished hammered lead and the cases are walnut. = The appearance is truly elegant and fits the room beautifully.   Anyway,   Roth opened with the first movement of the Widor 6th. The organ has ten times the impact of the Moller that was three times its size. While = part of it certainly has to do with it actually being in the room, the Fisk = sound is at once bold and colorful. More to the point WOW!   He continued with a W. T. Best transcription of a Mendelssohn Prelude = and Fugue (E minor?) and then finished the first part with the Bach partita = on - oh dear, I think it was "O Gott, du frommer Gott", which means it = probably wasn't. Not sure why the Mendelssohn was on the program but the Bach showed off the colors of the instrument.   The second part opened with a Guilmant movement (CRS) followed by the = Franck A minor chorale and the Scherzo from Vierne 2. The Franck was a bit mannered and tentative sounding. To make up for it, the Vierne almost = came off the rails. This is the third time I've heard Roth and I've never thought his playing impetuous but this certainly was.   He finished with the Durufle Chorale and Variations on Veni Creator = (doesn't anyone play the prelude any more? No time??) and the first movement of = the Dupre Passion Symphony. It's amazing what a small well thought out = organ can do.   The obligatory "Improvisation" followed. My French is worse than M. = Roth's English but I think the themes were Passion Chorale and Victimae = Paschali. This sounded more flung together than most. I couldn't really identify = the two themes until shortly before the close of the improvisation.   For an encore, he played THE Widor Toccata - complete with reduced registration (flutes) in the middle section and on the last page.   The organ: stunning to say the least. The first Fisk in the area, infinitely better than what it replaced and one of the best sounds in = town.   The organist: we had heard him twice before; on the impacted Moller that preceded the Fisk and the Skinner at St. Luke's here in Evanston and had never been overwhelmed by his playing. He seems to be one of those = justly revered musicians who don't necessarily light up an audience outside of their regular environs. The conductor Carlo Maria Guilini was Principal Guest Conductor of the Chicago Symphony in the 80s. The orchestra = adored him but his performances could be so low key that,, never mind.   M. Roth's playing on Sunday was the most unbuttoned we've heard. I = still wouldn't put him in my top ten list but he really showed why the Fisk = was there and I'm glad he was playing.   Now Bob can correct my faulty memory about the program and offer up a completely different point of view.   Michael    
(back) Subject: RE: Catholic vs non-catholic Ave Marias?? From: "Emmons, Paul" <PEMMONS@wcupa.edu> Date: Mon, 28 Feb 2005 15:16:34 -0500   The other well-known Ave Maria setting is by Gounod. Musically, it is actually an elaboration of the first prelude in Bach's Well-Tempered Clavier. There's no reason that others can't compose settings of the Ave Maria, and many others have. (Arcadelt, Victoria, Bruckner... One college-choir soloist intoning the Victoria dared to sing "I've got di'rhe-e-e-a" and bet that no one in the audience would notice.)   What "the Catholic Church allows" isn't nearly as simple an issue as you might think. I didn't know that either of these were undoable unless a specific priest says so. But the encyclical "Motu Proprio" of Pope (and Saint) Pius X in the early 20th century encouraged various music and prohibited various other music. It was quite restrictive even at that time, frowning on Haydn and Mozart masses, anything operatic in style, and the use of various instruments. As much as one might admire the intent and wish that what it ENcouraged and exhorted had been more conscientiously carried out, anyone but a purist would want to break the no-nos from time to time. It expected composers to write like Palestrina forever. Societies issued white lists and black lists of contemporaneous compositions that conformed or not. I'm afraid the white lists were dominated by names that have vanished by now into well-deserved obscurity; whereas among composers who objected and dissociated themselves from the German Caecilian movement, which advocated similar ideals a generation or two earlier, were Liszt, Brahms, Bruckner, and Rheinberger. Speaks volumes, doesn't it?=20   Apparently, the degree of compliance achieved was in effect up to individual bishops and priests. If they wanted a certain standard to prevail, they could cite the encyclical rather than just sounding arbitrary and constipated. At any rate, by the late 60s great hordes were openly thumbing their noses at the Motu Proprio in the name of "the spirit of Vatican II," and by now probably only a few connoisseurs of arcana even remember that it exists. I'd guess that strictly speaking it would forbid both the Schubert and the Gounod settings of the Ave Maria, first of all in that they are vocal solos.   However, the Schubert doesn't really contain the text of the prayer Ave Maria intact, so if and when the exact text of the prayer is important, it won't do. Perhaps this point is what your man has in mind. Hope you can get the specific information from someone.   (First tried to send this message on Friday, twice, and it keeps bouncing... This is the third time of asking. Maybe I need to take out the di'rhea bit?)      
(back) Subject: RE: Holy Name Flentrop in Chicago From: "Emmons, Paul" <PEMMONS@wcupa.edu> Date: Mon, 28 Feb 2005 17:30:18 -0500   > The room was terrible before either the Flentrop or the Casavant were glints in anyone's eyes.   > Michael - who was assistant organist there when the mongrel Wangerin, Johnson, kitchen sink was there.   One morning around Feb. 1967, I first walked into Holy Name Cathedral as someone was practicing Alain's Litanies on the mongrel Wangerin, and I remember it as thrilling. Maybe you were playing. However, I distinctly remember considerable reverberation. =20   But, then, I was just a small-town Wisconsin hick, college freshman, at large (for one precious day or two) in a metropolis for the first time in my life. Probably anything would have looked and sounded glorious as long as it was in the Loop.   However live the building may have once been, didn't Flentrop design the organ with those conditions in mind? Shortly thereafter they got the carpeting. When something like that happens, any self-respecting organ builder ought to be able to sue for damages.  
(back) Subject: Re: Fisk dedication in Chicago - longer than it should be From: <Gfc234@aol.com> Date: Tue, 01 Mar 2005 16:52:30 -0500   The fa=E7ade pipes are polished hammered lead and the cases are walnut. = The appearance is truly elegant and fits the room beautifully.   -the case is african mahogany and the console is quarter sawn oak.     My French is worse than M. Roth's English but I think the themes were Passion Chorale and Victimae Paschali. This sounded more flung together than most. I couldn't really identify = the two themes until shortly before the close of the improvisation.   ------------ yes-O Sacred Head and Victimae Paschali Laudes were the themes--he played = on O Sacred Head for about 5 minutes before he introduced Victimae = Paschali--near the close of the improvisation-the two themes appeared = together-one in manual, the other in pedal-however-I was expecting that he = would invert them-but he didn't.   Greg Ceurvorst-    
(back) Subject: RE: Fisk dedication in Chicago - longer than it should be From: "Michael David" <michaelandmaggy@comcast.net> Date: Tue, 1 Mar 2005 16:11:52 -0600   I must have been nuts. Yes indeed - mahogany.   Michael     -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of Gfc234@aol.com Sent: Tuesday, March 01, 2005 3:53 PM To: "PipeChat" Subject: Re: Fisk dedication in Chicago - longer than it should be   The fa=E7ade pipes are polished hammered lead and the cases are walnut. = The appearance is truly elegant and fits the room beautifully.   -the case is african mahogany and the console is quarter sawn oak.     My French is worse than M. Roth's English but I think the themes were Passion Chorale and Victimae = Paschali. This sounded more flung together than most. I couldn't really identify = the two themes until shortly before the close of the improvisation.   ------------ yes-O Sacred Head and Victimae Paschali Laudes were the themes--he = played on O Sacred Head for about 5 minutes before he introduced Victimae Paschali--near the close of the improvisation-the two themes appeared together-one in manual, the other in pedal-however-I was expecting that = he would invert them-but he didn't.   Greg Ceurvorst-     ****************************************************************** "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org>      
(back) Subject: RE: Holy Name Flentrop in Chicago From: "Michael David" <michaelandmaggy@comcast.net> Date: Tue, 1 Mar 2005 16:29:24 -0600   I was there in the 70s - long after the remodeling of the place but before the Flentrop or even the Casavant. The place was deader than the = proverbial door nail with lots of spots that were even deader. I don't know what changes were made while the Flentrop was in the works but I can't imagine anything that would have had that big an effect. It's possible that the room was somehow improved between the time I left and the time the = Flentrop was designed but I can't imagine how.   A couple of other related comments:   Winding on the Flentrop was marginal to say the least. St. Paul's = Cathedral choir was there perhaps ten years ago. The then-assistant played the = Vierne Carillon de Westminster on the Flentrop. The change in pitch on the big chords at the end was breathtaking.   Some have said that the carpeting was one of the reasons for Richard Proulx's departure. I can speak from experience that the attitude of the senior clergy towards any and all things musical was blatantly hostile. Thomas Day wasn't kidding.   Michael     -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of Emmons, Paul Sent: Monday, February 28, 2005 4:30 PM To: PipeChat Subject: RE: Holy Name Flentrop in Chicago   > The room was terrible before either the Flentrop or the Casavant were glints in anyone's eyes.   > Michael - who was assistant organist there when the mongrel Wangerin, Johnson, kitchen sink was there.   One morning around Feb. 1967, I first walked into Holy Name Cathedral as someone was practicing Alain's Litanies on the mongrel Wangerin, and I remember it as thrilling. Maybe you were playing. However, I distinctly remember considerable reverberation.   But, then, I was just a small-town Wisconsin hick, college freshman, at large (for one precious day or two) in a metropolis for the first time in my life. Probably anything would have looked and sounded glorious as long as it was in the Loop.   However live the building may have once been, didn't Flentrop design the organ with those conditions in mind? Shortly thereafter they got the carpeting. When something like that happens, any self-respecting organ builder ought to be able to sue for damages.      
(back) Subject: Re: Fisk dedication in Chicago - longer than it should be From: "N. Russotto" <ravenrockdesigns@gmail.com> Date: Tue, 1 Mar 2005 18:09:13 -0500   Daniel Roth has fairly good English, no? When I last heard him speak, his English was quite good, albeit with a rather heavy accent.   Nick     On Tue, 1 Mar 2005 16:11:52 -0600, Michael David <michaelandmaggy@comcast.net> wrote: > I must have been nuts. Yes indeed - mahogany. >=20 > Michael >=20 >=20 > -----Original Message----- > From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of > Gfc234@aol.com > Sent: Tuesday, March 01, 2005 3:53 PM > To: "PipeChat" > Subject: Re: Fisk dedication in Chicago - longer than it should be >=20 > The fa=E7ade pipes are polished hammered lead and the cases are walnut. = The > appearance is truly elegant and fits the room beautifully. >=20 > -the case is african mahogany and the console is quarter sawn oak. >=20 > My French is worse than M. Roth's > English but I think the themes were Passion Chorale and Victimae Paschali= .. > This sounded more flung together than most. I couldn't really identify t= he > two themes until shortly before the close of the improvisation. >=20 > ------------ > yes-O Sacred Head and Victimae Paschali Laudes were the themes--he played= on > O Sacred Head for about 5 minutes before he introduced Victimae > Paschali--near the close of the improvisation-the two themes appeared > together-one in manual, the other in pedal-however-I was expecting that h= e > would invert them-but he didn't. >=20 > Greg Ceurvorst- >=20 > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> >=20 > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> >=20 >=20     --=20 Nicholas F. Russotto Somers, Connecticut  
(back) Subject: Re: WWBD From: "Noel Stoutenburg" <mjolnir@ticnet.com> Date: Tue, 01 Mar 2005 18:09:27 -0600   ScottFop@aol.com wrote:   > What would Bach do?   And I might note that the question cannot be answered in the form posed, because it needs more background information. Do you mean, "What would Bach do if he came back knowing now exactly what he did in the early 18th century?", or "What would Bach do if he came back today, and had all of the benefits of the knowledge gained in the intervening two and three-quarter hundred years?" The answers to the questions are not necessarily the same.   To me, the more interesting points to ponder, are "If Bach came back today, would he use persist in using pen and paper, use 'Finale (R)', or use 'Sibelius (R)'?"   ns