PipeChat Digest #5198 - Sunday, March 6, 2005
 
Music at First Baptist Church/Garland, Texas
  by "F. Richard Burt" <effarbee@verizon.net>
Re: Music at First Baptist Church/Garland, Texas
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Ecletic Programming.
  by "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca>
The Wicks In Columbus, Ohio, from one who knows
  by <Wuxuzusu@aol.com>
Music List, March 6, 2005
  by "Randy Terry" <randy@peacham.homeip.net>
today's music
  by <BlueeyedBear@aol.com>
Ken Cowan in Shreveport
  by "Robert Ehrhardt" <r_ehrh@bellsouth.net>
Re: Eclectic Programming.
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Joseph Franck
  by "Robert Lind" <lindr@core.com>
Re: today's music
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
1932 Kimball
  by "jch" <opus1100@catoe.org>
RE: Eclectic Programming.
  by "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
Re: Joseph Franck
  by "N. Russotto" <ravenrockdesigns@gmail.com>
Re: Eclectic Programming.
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: today's music
  by <BlueeyedBear@aol.com>
Re: Music at First Baptist Church/Garland, Texas
  by <Innkawgneeto@cs.com>
Re: Music at First Baptist Church/Garland, Texas
  by <Innkawgneeto@cs.com>
 

(back) Subject: Music at First Baptist Church/Garland, Texas From: "F. Richard Burt" <effarbee@verizon.net> Date: Sun, 06 Mar 2005 12:05:34 -0600   Good Morning, PipeChatters: I was privileged to attend worship this morning for the first time since last November, and here is what we did: Free Improvisations on Old Hymn Tunes, by Kendall Kirk. piano Prelude "Praise the Lord with Drums and Cymbals" by Karg-Elert, Richard Ponder, Organist Call to Worship "What a Mighty God Can Do" by Jeff Reeves, sung by SonShine Singers (children ages 10-12), Directed by DeAnna Venable Welcome by Pastor, Dr. Greg Ammons "A Mighty Fortress Is Our God" in C, until last stanza modulated to D and organist improvised, with coda by Sanctuary Choir Prayer, led by Dr. Greg Ammons, Senior Pastor "Holy, Holy" hymn to the Trinity (No. 254 in Baptist Hymnal) "Jesus Is the Sweetest Name I Know," LOVELY NAME No. 205 in Baptist Hymnal) "In the Name of the Lord," NAME OF THE LORD, No. 174 in Baptist Hymnal Offertory Prayer by Jack Schmid, Associate Pastor Offertory by Sanctuary Choir, "Come Unto Me," by Mark Blankenship, a capella "Principles of Servanthood," by Dr. Greg Ammons, exposition based on John 13:1-17 "Out of My Bondage, Sorrow and Night," No. 310 Baptist Hymnal Benediction Song: Lord, I offer my life to You; Everything I've been through, Use it for Your glory. Lord, I offer my days to You, Lifting my praise to You As a pleasing sacrifice; Lord, I offer You my life. "Fugue in C Major," by Sebastian Bach All this was done with Sanctuary Choir, Directed by Don Blackley, Georgia Kornegay, pianist, and Richard Ponder, organist   For those trying to understand this style of mixed music, we call it a "blended" style of old and new music. F. Richard Burt ..    
(back) Subject: Re: Music at First Baptist Church/Garland, Texas From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Sun, 06 Mar 2005 16:04:06 -0500   On 3/6/05 1:05 PM, "F. Richard Burt" <effarbee@verizon.net> wrote:   > For those trying to understand this style of mixed music, we call it a > "blended" style of old and new music.   What's to understand? I think it looks fine. We do It that way every = week. (We just call it "eclectic.")   Alan    
(back) Subject: Ecletic Programming. From: "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca> Date: Sun, 06 Mar 2005 16:44:17 -0500   When I had my radio programme we were all categorised into various groups, My organ and choral programme was "Classics", then there was Rock. Country and Western, Jazz, you name it they had a category for it, - except one, anything that they didn't know what to do with, was "Eclectic" which covered all the rubbish you ever heard! I hope that for Alan's sake the music in his church is not "rubbish" - I am sure it is not! Bob Conway   At 04:04 PM 3/6/2005, Alan wrote: >On 3/6/05 1:05 PM, "F. Richard Burt" <effarbee@verizon.net> wrote: > > > For those trying to understand this style of mixed music, we call it a > > "blended" style of old and new music. > >What's to understand? I think it looks fine. We do It that way every = week. >(We just call it "eclectic.") > >Alan > > >****************************************************************** >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> >List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> >List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org>      
(back) Subject: The Wicks In Columbus, Ohio, from one who knows From: <Wuxuzusu@aol.com> Date: Sun, 6 Mar 2005 17:26:41 EST   Greetings all, With the amount of interest generated by the "Wicks In Columbus" thread, I = asked Mike Herzog, owner of Peebles-Herzog, The Organ Company, for his comments. Herzog is as close to the situation as anyone I know. Musically, Stan Krider Herzog's response: To the list, For all who read this, know that I spent a lot of time with the 1923 E.M. =   Skinner, and I've been responsible for maintenance of the Wicks since its =   installation in 1978. The Skinner (Opus 380) was a four manual instrument of about 64 ranks. = It contained the usual Skinner features, with a huge Swell, a robust Solo = topped by a Tuba that played on 25" of wind, a rather small Great, a Choir that = most of the readers could write down without knowing it, and an Augmented = Pedal that provided a 16' Open Wood, a Pedal Bourdon, and a huge, 32' reed. As was the style of that era, the Open Wood was divided on both sides of = the organ between the two story swell box and the facade, and the low 12 pipes = of the 32' Bombarde stood in front of the Great Organ. The Great chorus provided a 16' Diapason, First and Second Open Diapason, 4' Octave, 2-2/3' = Twelfth, and a 2' 15th. Due to the placement of the Great, the presence = of the 32' reed in front of the Great, and typical voicing practices that rendered = the 15th inaudible, the impact of the Great Organ in the Cathedral was that of = a freight train. The acoustic properties of the Cathedral are good, but = dull sounds in the space are not made better by the space. The Swell Organ had the usual battery of reeds, and the Choir had = mutations that were topped by a Septiem. The Swell was the real force in the = Skinner, both by design and by its commanding location on the top of the two story =   swell box that was (and still is) more than twenty feet wide. All in all, the Skinner was a great roar in the building, unpunctuated by =   brightness or clarity. While it is hard for some to admit, every now and = then Mr. Skinner built something less than a masterpiece, but those of you who = have lived long enough to observe the swinging of the tonal pendulum might = wonder with me - what were they thinking in 1923 when a thunderous roar was more =   important to their ears than clarity and traditional organ tone? The Skinner began to decline after forty years of use, and the decline was = caused, in large part, to a dirty environment made worse by the blowers location in the bell tower. The Cathedral had little interest in = spending money on the instrument, although they did obtain information about rebuilding it, =   albeit not in a restorative way. The impetus for doing something with the organ came when the Cathedral was = renovated in 1977-1978. The organist at the time was Mr. Greg Laukhaupt = and he was tasked with investigating a solution to the problems of the = Skinner. My business partner, Sam Peebles, and I worked with Greg, and given the available funding, we eventually came across the work of Mr. Robert M. = Turner, then of Hopewell, New Jersey. Bob was a wizard when it came to retaining the best pipe work, preserving the swell box of the Skinner, adding new = pipes, building a new console, and all in all, what we heard of Bob's work in = New Jersey and New York caused us to recommend him for the job. Actually, wild enthusiasm was more like it. In the fullness of time, we sold off the pipes from the Skinner that would = not be retained, and we hauled the organ down from the gallery, and loaded = it on a truck for shipment to New Jersey. Most of the work for the new organ was finished in Bob's shop when a = small fire destroyed the keyboards for the console, but the real damage was to = push Robert out of business. Eventually, everything was removed from Bob's = place, transported back to the Cathedral, hauled back up to the gallery, and the =   project ground to a halt until insurance matters were resolved. After casting about for a solution to the problem, the leadership of the Cathedral decided to retain the components from Bob Turner's work, to = retain his specification of the Organ, and to award the contract to the Wicks Organ Company. We hauled the organ down from the gallery, put it on a Wicks = truck, and off it went to Highland. Eventually, the organ returned to Columbus, = and we hauled it back up to the gallery, whereupon the people from Wicks = installed and finished the project. The organ was dedicated by Pierre Cochereau to = a packed Cathedral as one of four events dedicating the the renovation of = the Cathedral in 1978. Bob Turner's design is French in nature, and Wicks realized the design = well enough. The design has elements of its own, such as a Grand Orgue and a Positif Orgue that are nearly identical in scale and performance, = mutations that were realized from Skinner ranks cut down to become a new sound, and = foreign reeds that were never very stable, and with the passage of time and dirt = are nearly impossible to keep in tune. Very few ranks remain from the = Skinner, and it is more accurate to include Bob Turner's name next to the Wicks nameplate, and in fact Greg Lauckhaupt did just that with a small plate = acknowledging Bob's design. Nelson Barden declares that "fashion wears out more organs than playing = ever will", and his accurate observation applies to the Wicks. Fashion has changed, the organ isn't entirely successful both in mechanical and tonal = terms, but here is the key ingredient in securing a new organ. The music program under the direction of Paul A. Thornock II is simply superb, and his program demands a world-class instrument. For those of = you who know good music when you hear it, I invite you to Columbus to enjoy a = feast for your ears and for the spirit. The program is really that good. Paul Thornock respects the work of Paul Fritts. While I have heard but = one Fritts in person, I was thrilled with the sound produced by the = instrument, and I can't wait to hear his new organ in the Cathedral. I've often thought that if I wind up in hell, I'll be hauling the Skinner =   and the Wicks up and down the stairs to the gallery for all eternity! = Perhaps Mr. Fritts will take me off that hook. The AGO regional for our region will take place in Columbus in 2007. All = of you are invited to our city for this event, and we shall run the gamut of =   organs and performers that will include organs new and old, and some of = the finest performers in our Region. Mike Herzog Columbus    
(back) Subject: Music List, March 6, 2005 From: "Randy Terry" <randy@peacham.homeip.net> Date: Sun, 6 Mar 2005 15:47:43 -0800 (PST)   Could not copy the message to the digest, there was no plain text part
(back) Subject: today's music From: <BlueeyedBear@aol.com> Date: Sun, 6 Mar 2005 18:58:59 EST   Lent IV at Westminster Congregational UCC, Spokane, WA:   Prelude: Largo, fr Concerto in d minor, Vivaldi   Hymns: O Sing a Song of Bethlehem (KINGSFOLD) Surely No One Can Be Safer (TRYGGARE KAN INGEN VARA) Lift Your Head, O Martyrs, Weeping (MAGYAR)   Solo: At The River, Copland   Offertory: The Lord is My Shepherd, Pote   Communion: O Sacrum Convivium, Biery   Postlude: Adagio, fr String Quartet, Barber  
(back) Subject: Ken Cowan in Shreveport From: "Robert Ehrhardt" <r_ehrh@bellsouth.net> Date: Sun, 6 Mar 2005 19:12:16 -0500   A sizable crowd for these parts was blessed this afternoon with a = performance of the Dupr=E9 "Le Chemin de la Croix" by Ken Cowan assisted = by reader Dr. George Newtown. This took place at St. Mark's Cathedral = (Episcopal) here in Shreveport, Louisiana on Aeolian-Skinner Opus 1308, = IV-101, built in 1959. The cathedral's acoustics are ideal for organ and = choir; not a strip of carpet or pew cushioning in sight (with the possible = exception of the Bishop's throne!)   Lacking the gifts of Mr. Wechsler and some others who write for the = list, I will not try to review this performance, other than to say that it = was the first time in many years that I have been truly moved by an organ = performance, made the more so by the presence of William Teague, who gave = the first performance of the work that I ever heard many years ago on this = very instrument, for which he was responsible and over which he presided = for many years.   If you ever have the opportunity to hear Mr. Cowan play this amazing = work, DO NOT MISS IT!   Robert Ehrhardt Noel Memorial UMC Shreveport, LA USA http://www.zimbel.com/ehrhardt.html    
(back) Subject: Re: Eclectic Programming. From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Sun, 06 Mar 2005 19:23:32 -0500   On 3/6/05 4:44 PM, "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca> wrote:   > anything that they didn't know what to do with, was "Eclectic" which cove= red > all the rubbish you ever heard! I hope that for Alan's sake the music in = his > church is not "rubbish" - I am sure it is not!   Oh, I hope not. I THINK that "eclectic" comes from the same Greek roots as "ecclesiastical," meaning, "out-called." So I think they were using the wrong word altogether. It does NOT mean =B3don=B9t know how to classify.=B2 (Or =B3rubbish.=B2) =20   Today, for a handed-to-me random example, our music was:   Prelude: Darius Milhaud Great Litany (chanted in procession, a cappella) Psalmody: Anglican chant (which we don=B9t use much) Gregorian Gospel acclamations Hauptlied: Irish, 8th to 10th century Our Father (Gregorian chant a cappella) Communion hymn: Marty Haugen (which we don=B9t use much either) Recessional: In Babilone (18th century Dutch folktune) Postlude: Wilbur Held (on the recessional)   There was supposed to be another anthem, but the composer didn=B9t get it finished in time, so it was replaced by something I=B9ve forgotten already (Appalachian, I think).   Alan (the preaching was eclectic, too, but that=B9s another story for anothe= r list) =20          
(back) Subject: Joseph Franck From: "Robert Lind" <lindr@core.com> Date: Sun, 6 Mar 2005 18:30:40 -0600   This morning on "With Heart and Voice," Richard Gladwell began his program with an organ work by Joseph Franck, C=E9sar's younger brother. I never = knew there was a younger brother, and at such times I have to wonder where I've been all my life. Gladwell said the work was a Prelude and Fugue in C = Major (at the conclusion he said C Minor). I was listening to my car radio as I drove to my church, and thanks to perfect pitch, I knew the work was in G Major. It apparently is one of 6 preludes and fugues, and the selection = was played by Kurt Lueders. Not the greatest piece ever written, but I wonder = if the collection en toto is worth having or if there is some other organ = work by this composer that shows him at his best. I'd like to have something by him and wonder if anyone can suggest what his finest work(s) may be.   Many thanks,   Robert Lind    
(back) Subject: Re: today's music From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Sun, 06 Mar 2005 19:32:35 -0500   On 3/6/05 6:58 PM, "BlueeyedBear@aol.com" <BlueeyedBear@aol.com> wrote:   > Surely No One Can Be Safer (TRYGGARE KAN INGEN VARA) >=20 Scott! What on EARTH is a UCC congregation doing, singing the Norwegian National Anthem???   I=B9m absolutely astonished (but also impressed, of course!). (I hope you kept it MOVING!) =20   Alan (wondering who wrote a new text for it)  
(back) Subject: 1932 Kimball From: "jch" <opus1100@catoe.org> Date: Sun, 06 Mar 2005 18:40:23 -0600   As I mentioned to some of you on the IRC Friday, that I was going to hear a recital on a 1932 Kimball organ in Lake Bluff this afternoon. I was not disappointed as it is a classic Kimball organ. The only criticism of the program I could make is that unfortunately it is not an organ friendly room, however I am thankful that this church is interested in preserving their Kimball. As Sand asked, is it an original installation?, I find that it is not. It was originally installed in the Church of the Holy Spirit in nearby Lake Forest. For some reason the Church of the Holy Spirit decided to get rid of the instrument and gave it to the Grace United Methodist Church in Lake Bluff. The organ was moved by Frank J. Saluter and sons and installed in the UMC in 1973, The organ is very romantic and for that reason in 1988, 1989 additional upper work and mixtures was added by Ronald Sauter to' enable the instrument to perform a wider range of selections. Frank Sauter told the church at the time he moved the organ, that he had made the original installation at Holy Spirit. I assumed that means he was a Kimball installer in his younger days. The successor to Frank Sauter and Sons continues to provide service for the organ.   Organ Recital Program by Michael Gagne, organist, Grace United Methodist = Church of Lake Bluff, Illinois.   He opened with the National Anthem followed by the formal program:   Prelude in C major BWV 547 J.S. Bach Soul, Adorne Thyself with Gladness J.S. Bach/arr. Virgil Fox Four Flute Clocks Franz Joseph Haydn Jubilation Suite Gordon Young 1. Trumpet Tune 2. Air 3. Album Leaf 4. Jubilation   Hymn #139 Praise the Lord the Almighty Lobe Denn Herren Congregational singing V1 Unison, V2 Parts, V3 women, V4 Men V5 = Unison   Toccata and Fugue on Lobe Den Herren Michael Adamcyk (who was a former organist at Grace UMC and was present at the recital)   Intermission   Trumpet Tune David German Holy God, We Praise thy Name arr. Diane Bish All Things Bright and Beautiful arr. Michael Gagne Pasticcio Jean Langlais Prelude on Londonderry Air Noel Rawthorne   Hymn All Hail the Power of Jesus' Name (Diadem) Congregation: V1 Unison V2 Parts V3 Woman V4 Men V5 & 5 Unison   (a fine Methodist Hymn which was a childhood favorite of mine from the = days when my dad played the Hammond in a tiny Methodist Church....oh for a good Kimball)   Toccata Flor Peters   Buenas Dias   Jon    
(back) Subject: RE: Eclectic Programming. From: "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Mon, 7 Mar 2005 13:48:02 +1300   >Oh, I hope not. =A0I THINK that "eclectic" comes from the same Greek = roots as "ecclesiastical," meaning, "out-called." =A0So I think they were using = the wrong word altogether. =A0It does NOT mean =93don=92t know how to = classify.=94 =A0(Or =93rubbish.=94) =A0   In fact, no. "Eclectic" comes from the Greek "pick out" and = "ecclesiastical" from the Greek word for "church".   Ross    
(back) Subject: Re: Joseph Franck From: "N. Russotto" <ravenrockdesigns@gmail.com> Date: Sun, 6 Mar 2005 19:44:39 -0500   A younger Franck brother? What next, NASA will find out that the moon is, in fact, made of cheese? But in all seriousness, I had heard these works dismissed as "crap. complete and total crap" by one of the more distinguished organists in my area. Evidently, Joseph, was tired of living in his brother's shadow, and decided to compose some works of his own, going on what my friend had told me. . . Joseph is listed in no major composers encyclopedia, and could find little mention of him at all on Google. Hope this helps,   NFRussotto         On Sun, 6 Mar 2005 18:30:40 -0600, Robert Lind <lindr@core.com> wrote: > This morning on "With Heart and Voice," Richard Gladwell began his progra= m > with an organ work by Joseph Franck, C=E9sar's younger brother. I never k= new > there was a younger brother, and at such times I have to wonder where I'v= e > been all my life. Gladwell said the work was a Prelude and Fugue in C Maj= or > (at the conclusion he said C Minor). I was listening to my car radio as I > drove to my church, and thanks to perfect pitch, I knew the work was in G > Major. It apparently is one of 6 preludes and fugues, and the selection w= as > played by Kurt Lueders. Not the greatest piece ever written, but I wonder > if > the collection en toto is worth having or if there is some other organ wo= rk > by this composer that shows him at his best. I'd like to have something b= y > him and wonder if anyone can suggest what his finest work(s) may be. >=20 > Many thanks, >=20 > Robert Lind >=20 >=20 > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> >=20 >=20   --=20 Nicholas F. Russotto Somers, Connecticut  
(back) Subject: Re: Eclectic Programming. From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Sun, 06 Mar 2005 20:12:51 -0500   On 3/6/05 7:48 PM, "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> wrote:   > In fact, no. "Eclectic" comes from the Greek "pick out" and "ecclesiastic= al" > from the Greek word for "church". >=20 "Called out", "picked out," whatever. Sounds like about the same thing. Nevertheless, perhaps you're right, since my handiest dictionary at the moment links =B3call=B2 to Old Norse =B3kalla,=B2 and not to Greek at all! (And o= f course you=B9re right about =B3church,=B2 but we had assumed that.)   What DOES the Greek =B3kaleuein=B2 mean? =B3Pick=B2? Maybe so!   Alan  
(back) Subject: Re: today's music From: <BlueeyedBear@aol.com> Date: Sun, 6 Mar 2005 20:45:38 EST   In a message dated 3/6/05 4:33:21 PM Pacific Standard Time,=20 acfreed0904@earthlink.net writes:   > On 3/6/05 6:58 PM, "BlueeyedBear@aol.com" <BlueeyedBear@aol.com> wrote: >=20 > >> Surely No One Can Be Safer (TRYGGARE KAN INGEN VARA) >>=20 >=20 > Scott! What on EARTH is a UCC congregation doing, singing the Norwegian=20 > National Anthem??? >=20 > I=E2=80=99m absolutely astonished (but also impressed, of course!). (I ho= pe you=20 > kept it MOVING!) =20 >=20 > Alan (wondering who wrote a new text for it)=20   hey babe, we do a little of everything, (except rap & gaither). the hymnal=20 calls it a Swedish folk melody, and the harmony is from Song Book for Sunday= =20 School, 1871. Linda Sandell (b. 1832-1903) write the text, which was transl= ated=20 in 1994:     Surely no on can be safer than God's children, held in favor, Not the stars so brightly burning, not the birds to nests returning. (i neve= r=20 said it was shakespeare)   With the flock God is abiding, heaven's plenty all providing, Rich in mercy, never sparing, like a father, gently caring.   None shall ever meet rejection, be denied God's own protection; Has there been a friend who better knows our hopes, our fears that fetter?   Whether taking, whether giving, God alone remains forgiving, And with one true purpose holy to preserve our welfare solely.   scot (one T) in spokane  
(back) Subject: Re: Music at First Baptist Church/Garland, Texas From: <Innkawgneeto@cs.com> Date: Sun, 6 Mar 2005 21:32:06 EST   I went to school with Dr. Ammons.   In certain situations, "blended" worship (some call it convergent) works = very very well.   I think Lent is a wonderful time to mix styles when liturgically = appropriate. At my Church, our choir has been doing spirituals, Brahms motets, contemporary anthems (for lack of a better term),  
(back) Subject: Re: Music at First Baptist Church/Garland, Texas From: <Innkawgneeto@cs.com> Date: Sun, 6 Mar 2005 21:34:28 EST   I apologize that I didn't finish my e-mail before I submitted it.   Next Sunday, we will sing Stainer's "God So Loved the World", which technically should have been done 2 weeks ago, but o well.   With 3 1/2 seconds of reverb, I do as much unaccompanied music as I can.   Peace to you all.   Neil by the Bay