PipeChat Digest #5203 - Tuesday, March 8, 2005
 
Re: A sad day (Austin)
  by "Desiree'" <nicemusica@yahoo.com>
Austin: the end of a great organ builder
  by "Stephen Roberts" <sroberts01@snet.net>
Re: Italics
  by <RMB10@aol.com>
Danny Boy
  by <Wuxuzusu@aol.com>
Italicized print cause...
  by <Wuxuzusu@aol.com>
Austin
  by "Richard  Weber" <rfweber@ticon.net>
Re: Danny Boy
  by "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
Re: Austin
  by <Keys4bach@aol.com>
Austin Organs
  by <Justinhartz@aol.com>
Re: A sad day (Austin)
  by <RMB10@aol.com>
Re: A sad day (Austin)
  by "N. Russotto" <ravenrockdesigns@gmail.com>
Re: A sad day (Austin)
  by "Desiree'" <nicemusica@yahoo.com>
Re: A sad day (Austin)
  by "Ray Ahrens" <ray_ahrens@msn.com>
Austin and the so-called rumors
  by "Desiree'" <nicemusica@yahoo.com>
MY NEW HAUS-ORGEL (x-post, non-Theatre Organ)
  by <ScottFop@aol.com>
Re: MY NEW HAUS-ORGEL (x-post, non-Theatre Organ)
  by "N. Russotto" <ravenrockdesigns@gmail.com>
On the Death of Austin
  by "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net>
Austin Organs
  by "Harry Martenas" <harry.martenas@gmail.com>
Uses for old wood pipes
  by "Keith Zimmerman" <kwzimmerman@alltel.net>
Londonderry Air
  by "First Christian Church of Casey, IL" <kzrev@rr1.net>
Londonderry Air
  by "Robert Lind" <lindr@core.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: A sad day (Austin) From: "Desiree'" <nicemusica@yahoo.com> Date: Tue, 8 Mar 2005 11:54:13 -0800 (PST)   I almost cried when I heard this news. I learned in Mississippi on an = Austin, won a competition on that Austin, and really enjoyed getting to = know the Southeast rep and remember the day i met the late Zoli, who was = the reed voicer, I think. I truly enjoy Austin organs, and have played 3. = One from the 20's, one and 2 from the late 70's. Rumors... Some of us on the list have been on the receptive end of rumors. What = enjoyment do people get out of spreading rumors about others in this = field? One has no idea. It's almost like it is a turn-on for them...as = though they will gain something out of alienating potential audiences, = purchasers, and fans of particular instruments, performers, builders, = teachers, and authorities in the field. My mother told me as a child, and still does, a little blurb: Your own = kind will do you wrong and work to get you down. You take that and interpret it how you want to.             From Desiree' T. Desiree' Hines Chicago, IL 60610 ---------------------------- For Compositions by Desiree' Frog Music Press www.frogmusic.com ------------------------------- FOR CONCERTS BY DESIREE' http://concertartist.info/bios/hines.html __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around http://mail.yahoo.com
(back) Subject: Austin: the end of a great organ builder From: "Stephen Roberts" <sroberts01@snet.net> Date: Tue, 8 Mar 2005 12:25:41 -0800 (PST)   Dear List, I was truly saddened to learn of the closing of Austin Organs, Inc. = Austin was one of the oldest organ building firms in the USA in continuous = existence, and they built many distinguished instruments. I can = personally testify to the solidity, reliability, and elegance of the = Austin organs I have played over my life. I began my studies 40 years ago = on their Opus 1285 of 1925, a four manual organ built for the First = Presbyterian Church of Laurel, MS. That organ was later rebuilt by = Aeolian-Skinner as their Opus 1498 of 1968. Fortunately, like many great = American organ builders of the past--Tannenberg, Appleton, Erben, Johnson, = Hook and Hastings, Roosevelt, Hutchings, Skinner, Aeolian, = Aeolian-Skinner, Kimball, Moller and many others-- they leave behind many = wonderful examples of their work as a testament to their art. It is very = sad that they have now been relegated to history, but it is an illustrious = history of which Austin employees, past and present, can justly be very proud. My sincere regrets and condolences to Kim Austin, who only = recently lost her father. The loss of the family firm at this time must = be almost too much to bear. We all grieve for her, and for all the fine = people at Austin. Organ building firms usually die slow, painful deaths. I see in the = recent events leading to the closing of Austin a parallel to the last days = of Aeolian-Skinner, another very distinguished firm. In both cases rumors = of their demise had been swirling about for a long time. March 7, 2005 at = 3:25 p.m. will be remembered as a very dark day in American organ = building. Stephen Roberts Western CT State University, Danbury, CT  
(back) Subject: Re: Italics From: <RMB10@aol.com> Date: Tue, 8 Mar 2005 16:05:27 EST   I get my Pipechat in digest form too, and in the last one #5202, it = switched from plain text, to italics, and to bold. It switched to Italics in the = first post when it quoted from a previous post, from then on, everything was in Italics, or bold Italics. Even the post I sent, which was in plain text, = came as Italics. Please when sending to the list, use plain text.   Monty Bennett  
(back) Subject: Danny Boy From: <Wuxuzusu@aol.com> Date: Tue, 8 Mar 2005 16:14:57 EST   Concerning the furor about "Danny Boy", I heard a long time ago that the "Danny Boy" lyrics were that of an old Irish man saying good bye to his = only living son who was going off to fight the English invaders. The old man = knows that English sympathizers were roaming the Kelly Green hills of the = Emerald Isles killing any Irish males they encountered. Thus the old man knew he = would not be alive when his son returned from the war. Is there any truth to the version my memory recalls for me? Just wanting to set the record straight, if anyone knows the facts. Stan Krider  
(back) Subject: Italicized print cause... From: <Wuxuzusu@aol.com> Date: Tue, 8 Mar 2005 16:23:58 EST   Greetings Justin, It seems that for some reason the italics began with Roy Kersey's posting. = He copied the italicized post he was responding to, and apparently the = server, or something did not return the print to the non-italicized style. Whose fault? Who knows. Probably some software malfunction... (At least the = software won't start a flame war if it is wrongly accused - will it?) Stan Krider   In a message dated 3/8/2005 2:55:27 PM Eastern Standard Time, pipechat@pipechat.org writes: Subject: Re: Italics From: <Justinhartz@aol.com> Date: Tue, 8 Mar 2005 12:49:23 EST   In the middle of pipechat digest, the print on my computer changed to Italics. Has this happened to everyone, or is there something wrong with my = computer. On my screen, this font is difficult to read.   Justin       ----- Original Message ----- From: "Roy Kersey" <rkersey@tds.net> To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Subject: Re: Bite back; make it work Date: Tue, 8 Mar 2005 0:01:47 -0500   > > Hello Jan and Learned Musicians, > I read with interest what Jan wrote about Londonderry Air: > > <> perhaps, Winton Marsailis was going to play it.>> > > I immediately got out both my Bb and C trumpets and played it on >   This ends the italicized print section.  
(back) Subject: Austin From: "Richard Weber" <rfweber@ticon.net> Date: Tue, 8 Mar 2005 15:20:55 -0600   Has anyone heard more about Austin's closing?   Richard Weber
(back) Subject: Re: Danny Boy From: "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> Date: Tue, 8 Mar 2005 16:26:14 -0500   More information than anyone would want to know about the song may be=20 found at:   http://www.standingstones.com/danny3.html   I haven't read all of it, but I believe this question is addressed.   Randy Runyon     On Mar 8, 2005, at 4:14 PM, Wuxuzusu@aol.com wrote:   > > Concerning the furor about "Danny Boy", I=A0heard a long time ago=A0that= =20 > the "Danny Boy" lyrics were that of an old Irish man saying good bye=20=   > to his only living son who was going off to fight the English=20 > invaders. The old man knows that English sympathizers were roaming the=20=   > Kelly Green hills of the Emerald Isles killing any=A0Irish males they=20=   > encountered.=A0=A0Thus the old man knew he would not be alive when his = son=20 > returned from the war. > =A0 > Is there any truth to the version my memory recalls for me? > =A0 > Just wanting to set the record straight, if anyone knows the facts.=A0 > =A0 > =A0 > Stan Krider  
(back) Subject: Re: Austin From: <Keys4bach@aol.com> Date: Tue, 8 Mar 2005 16:35:01 EST   In a message dated 3/8/2005 4:26:48 P.M. Eastern Standard Time, rfweber@ticon.net writes:   Has anyone heard more about Austin's closing?       just the usual rumors about money and so on.....last summer this was the story. it just lasted longer than anyone suspected..... sorry to see it go.......we need more not less. dale in florida  
(back) Subject: Austin Organs From: <Justinhartz@aol.com> Date: Tue, 8 Mar 2005 16:58:50 EST   I'm so sorry to hear about the death of the Austin organ company. Sorry, but not surprised. It truly is the end of an era. Which church didn't pay for their instrument? Perhaps organists across the world could start a letter writing campaign = to the deadbeat church!   Justin  
(back) Subject: Re: A sad day (Austin) From: <RMB10@aol.com> Date: Tue, 8 Mar 2005 17:19:55 EST   Desiree' wrote: >I almost cried when I heard this news. I learned in Mississippi on an Austin, won a >competition on that Austin, and really enjoyed getting to = know the Southeast rep and >remember the day i met the late Zoli, who was the reed voicer, I think. I truly enjoy Austin >organs, and have played 3. One from = the 20's, one and 2 from the late 70's.   One can't judge any company by just three of their instruments and from = two widely different eras. I've played many Austins and one can never fault = their workmanship. I always liked the older Austin organs--they had some great = big principal choruses and some weighty pedal divisions (a lot of lumber down there). It's the end of an era in American organ building. I was hoping = never to see the demise of another big firm after the close of Moller, but that day =   has come again...     >Rumors... >Some of us on the list have been on the receptive end of rumors. What enjoyment do >people get out of spreading rumors about others in this = field? One has no idea. It's almost >like it is a turn-on for them...as though they will gain something out of alienating potential >audiences, purchasers, and = fans of particular instruments, performers, builders, teachers, >and authorities = in the field.   >My mother told me as a child, and still does, a little blurb: Your own = kind will do you wrong >and work to get you down.   >You take that and interpret it how you want to.   You always manage to turn a post around to yourself, Desiree'. The post = was about Austin, let's keep things on track. I don't know what kinds of = rumors were spread about you, nor do I care. You have told us things about your = past and others have blurted out truths about your past, so I don't know how = those became rumors. Anyway, let's keep the focus on Austin here.     Monty Bennett  
(back) Subject: Re: A sad day (Austin) From: "N. Russotto" <ravenrockdesigns@gmail.com> Date: Tue, 8 Mar 2005 17:26:46 -0500   I have enjoyed all of the Austins that I have played, including the Kostchmar (ex. the Spelling) in Maine. They are wonderful instruments, and I am sure that their presence will be greatly missed. Can we start a letter writing chain to that nasty church that didnt cough up the dough? Does anyone know who it was, or, at the very least, where that church is? Off list is fine. . .     Nick     On Tue, 8 Mar 2005 17:19:55 EST, RMB10@aol.com <RMB10@aol.com> wrote: > Desiree' wrote: > >I almost cried when I heard this news. I learned in Mississippi on an > Austin, won a >competition on that Austin, and really enjoyed getting to = know the > Southeast rep and >remember the day i met the late Zoli, who was the = reed > voicer, I think. I truly enjoy Austin >organs, and have played 3. One = from the 20's, > one and 2 from the late 70's. > > One can't judge any company by just three of their instruments and from = two > widely different eras. I've played many Austins and one can never fault = their > workmanship. I always liked the older Austin organs--they had some = great big > principal choruses and some weighty pedal divisions (a lot of lumber = down > there). It's the end of an era in American organ building. I was = hoping never to > see the demise of another big firm after the close of Moller, but that = day > has come again... > > > >Rumors... > >Some of us on the list have been on the receptive end of rumors. What > enjoyment do >people get out of spreading rumors about others in this = field? One has > no idea. It's almost >like it is a turn-on for them...as though they = will > gain something out of alienating potential >audiences, purchasers, and = fans of > particular instruments, performers, builders, teachers, >and authorities = in the > field. > > >My mother told me as a child, and still does, a little blurb: Your own = kind > will do you wrong >and work to get you down. > > >You take that and interpret it how you want to. > > You always manage to turn a post around to yourself, Desiree'. The post = was > about Austin, let's keep things on track. I don't know what kinds of = rumors > were spread about you, nor do I care. You have told us things about = your past > and others have blurted out truths about your past, so I don't know how = those > became rumors. Anyway, let's keep the focus on Austin here. > > Monty Bennett > > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> > >     -- Nicholas F. Russotto Somers, Connecticut Moderator/Owner: Monarch of Music  
(back) Subject: Re: A sad day (Austin) From: "Desiree'" <nicemusica@yahoo.com> Date: Tue, 8 Mar 2005 14:29:06 -0800 (PST)   The 20's Austin had a 16' Open Wood and a about 3 16' Pedal reeds, one of = which had wooden resonators. It also had a wonderfull set of HP Tubas. As far as rumors, that was indeed to put the focus on Austin. Appearantly, = there are rumors flying around about the company that have come to hurt = them. When saying that ones' own kind will get one down...that is to say = that people in the field of Organ Performance are probably the ones who = initiated any rumors about the company. And those rumors that allegedly = have been put out there by people in the field of Organ = Performance...have, apparantly, been a part of the failure of "ones own = kind". I don't know the rumors that were offered, so I can't comment any = further. I can say that I have seen the postings about a church wanting a = visual of a potential installation, but as some listers stated, that may = have been costly.   RMB10@aol.com wrote: Desiree' wrote: >I almost cried when I heard this news. I learned in Mississippi on an Austin, won a >competition on that Austin, and really enjoyed getting to = know the Southeast rep and >remember the day i met the late Zoli, who was the reed voicer, I think. I truly enjoy Austin >organs, and have played 3. One from = the 20's, one and 2 from the late 70's.   One can't judge any company by just three of their instruments and from = two widely different eras. I've played many Austins and one can never fault = their workmanship. I always liked the older Austin organs--they had some great = big principal choruses and some weighty pedal divisions (a lot of lumber down there). It's the end of an era in American organ building. I was hoping = never to see the demise of another big firm after the close of Moller, but that day =   has come again...     >Rumors... >Some of us on the list have been on the receptive end of rumors. What enjoyment do >people get out of spreading rumors about others in this = field? One has no idea. It's almost >like it is a turn-on for them...as though they will gain something out of alienating potential >audiences, purchasers, and = fans of particular instruments, performers, builders, teachers, >and authorities = in the field.   >My mother told me as a child, and still does, a little blurb: Your own = kind will do you wrong >and work to get you down.   >You take that and interpret it how you want to.   You always manage to turn a post around to yourself, Desiree'. The post = was about Austin, let's keep things on track. I don't know what kinds of = rumors were spread about you, nor do I care. You have told us things about your = past and others have blurted out truths about your past, so I don't know how = those became rumors. Anyway, let's keep the focus on Austin here.     Monty Bennett   ****************************************************************** "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org List-Subscribe: List-Digest: List-Unsubscribe:       From Desiree' T. Desiree' Hines Chicago, IL 60610 ---------------------------- For Compositions by Desiree' Frog Music Press www.frogmusic.com ------------------------------- FOR CONCERTS BY DESIREE' http://concertartist.info/bios/hines.html --------------------------------- Celebrate Yahoo!'s 10th Birthday! Yahoo! Netrospective: 100 Moments of the Web
(back) Subject: Re: A sad day (Austin) From: "Ray Ahrens" <ray_ahrens@msn.com> Date: Tue, 08 Mar 2005 17:10:46 -0600   Could not copy the message to the digest, there was no plain text part
(back) Subject: Austin and the so-called rumors From: "Desiree'" <nicemusica@yahoo.com> Date: Tue, 8 Mar 2005 15:21:03 -0800 (PST)   I son't know what the rumors are about Austin that may have been a part of = titems leading to their closure. As Monty said, it is sad to see a legacy go down. The rumors part of the message was basically to say...don't go complaining = when people talk about the shortage of organists, organ companies closing, = and other things that may be adverse in the field. The same people doing = the complaining may very well be the ones to point fingers, offer sadness = when it comes to organist shortage, or firms closing. And you know = something that Mothers said when we were growing up...you point one finger = at another, there are 3 pointing back.   __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around http://mail.yahoo.com
(back) Subject: MY NEW HAUS-ORGEL (x-post, non-Theatre Organ) From: <ScottFop@aol.com> Date: Tue, 8 Mar 2005 18:55:21 EST   Hello all!   Just wanted to share the happy news that my new house organ is in and playing! It arrived today and was installed and tuned. It is such a cool = little organ, and will be perfect for learning notes and keeping my fingers going = when away from church.   The little organ was built by 1959 by Hermann Schlicker of Buffalo, New = York and was originally installed in a practice studio in the Music School at = Notre Dame University in South Bend, Indiana. The stoplist is as follows:   MANUAL I: Principal 8, Gedeckt 8, Fugara 4, Gedeckt 2 MANUAL II: Gedeckt 8, Gedeckt 4, Principal 2 PEDAL: Subbass 16, Gedeckt 8, Choral Bass 4   It is very similar to a little Wicks Portative that I had several years = ago, and with almost an identical stoplist except that the Wicks had 8', 4', = 1-1/3' on the top manual. I am really impressed with the gentle, singing quality = of these pipes. I hadn't played many Schlicker organs, but have always known =   that their pipework was very high quality and had a very lyrical quality. = I would love to welcome visitors to hear and play the little organ anytime. =     My music room is really coming along beautifully now with today's addition = of the organ, the Straube player piano (Chicago, circa 1925) and my Victor VV-XVI Victrola (circa 1917). All I need to do is get my Hardman-Peck = grand piano here from storage in Pittsburgh and the music room will be complete. But = it's nice to be able to make music whenever I want to and without bothering anybody!   I am very proud of the little organ and want folks to see, hear and try it =   out. Advance notice is appreciated if possible.   Thanks for reading! -Scott 682-3077 home 259-3262 office   Scott F. Foppiano Organist and Director of Parish Music Holy Rosary Catholic Church, Memphis, TN In te Domine speravi, non confundar in aeternum.  
(back) Subject: Re: MY NEW HAUS-ORGEL (x-post, non-Theatre Organ) From: "N. Russotto" <ravenrockdesigns@gmail.com> Date: Tue, 8 Mar 2005 19:01:42 -0500   Hey, Scott. . .   Congratulations on your new purchase, I'm sure you'll be very happy with it. Where can we see some pictures of it?   NFRussotto     On Tue, 8 Mar 2005 18:55:21 EST, ScottFop@aol.com <ScottFop@aol.com> = wrote: > Hello all! > > Just wanted to share the happy news that my new house organ is in and > playing! It arrived today and was installed and tuned. It is such a = cool > little organ, and will be perfect for learning notes and keeping my = fingers > going when away from church. > > The little organ was built by 1959 by Hermann Schlicker of Buffalo, New = York > and was originally installed in a practice studio in the Music School at > Notre Dame University in South Bend, Indiana. The stoplist is as = follows: > > MANUAL I: Principal 8, Gedeckt 8, Fugara 4, Gedeckt 2 > MANUAL II: Gedeckt 8, Gedeckt 4, Principal 2 > PEDAL: Subbass 16, Gedeckt 8, Choral Bass 4 > > It is very similar to a little Wicks Portative that I had several years = ago, > and with almost an identical stoplist except that the Wicks had 8', 4', > 1-1/3' on the top manual. I am really impressed with the gentle, = singing > quality of these pipes. I hadn't played many Schlicker organs, but have > always known that their pipework was very high quality and had a very > lyrical quality. I would love to welcome visitors to hear and play the > little organ anytime. > > My music room is really coming along beautifully now with today's = addition > of the organ, the Straube player piano (Chicago, circa 1925) and my = Victor > VV-XVI Victrola (circa 1917). All I need to do is get my Hardman-Peck = grand > piano here from storage in Pittsburgh and the music room will be = complete. > But it's nice to be able to make music whenever I want to and without > bothering anybody! > > I am very proud of the little organ and want folks to see, hear and try = it > out. > Advance notice is appreciated if possible. > > Thanks for reading! > -Scott > 682-3077 home > 259-3262 office > > Scott F. Foppiano > Organist and Director of Parish Music > Holy Rosary Catholic Church, Memphis, TN > In te Domine speravi, non confundar in aeternum. >     -- Nicholas F. Russotto Somers, Connecticut Moderator/Owner: Monarch of Music  
(back) Subject: On the Death of Austin From: "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net> Date: Tue, 8 Mar 2005 19:35:48 -0500   On the Death of Austin       A few weeks ago, I posted twice about programs in Dr. John Lienhard's = radio series, "The Engines of our Ingenuity." The program that first caught my attention was the one about the Barker Lever and Cavaille-Coll, and = without trying to make a comparison between Barker, C-C and Austin, I think it = fair to say that the founding Austins brought amazing and ingenious devices to bear on how an Organ might work. Correct me if I am wrong - is it not fair =   to say that these mechanical innovations did not effect the sound of the instrument or the possibilities of it in a way that might actually open up =   new pathways to composers. So, if accepting that, the ingenuity served the =   way the company could organize the structure of the instrument, and also, presumably, economize (a big thing, that) in construction. Oh, and one = must not forget the very significant ease of maintenance of the action. The instruments were wonderfully durable, with examples from the beginning of the 20th century still functioning well. A key or stop action could easily =   be removed and be replaced, from the great store of parts held in = Hartford. The service person only needed to go through that wonderful air lock, wind =   on, and look upward, and as a helper at the console played, find the offending action, pull it out and replace it. Deficits, not thought of as such by many, were to me the extreme steadiness of the wind. When the instrument is sitting on a windchest the size of a New York apartment kitchen, there is a lot of air shoring up the tone. Some have also found = the voicing of pipes on this action problematical. I can't speak to that personally. Frankly, I think the entire system is a little miracle of ingenuity, a really beautiful thing to behold and contemplate. It now goes =   into the realm of a museum piece, albeit with living, breathing examples = to be seen and heard at work throughout the country. One hopes that those who =   worked on Woodland Avenue in Hartford, who now are without that work, will =   find their skills wanted elsewhere.       My very real regrets to the indefatigable Kim, who loved, lived, and breathed the Austin ethos. It is a great legacy, and she worked hard to serve it well. And I now, almost to a certainty, that once I post this, I will have a letter from her saying something like pure b____ s____! = Sorry, but I think I am speaking the truth.       Greetings to all, here in the middle of a great blizzard.       Malcolm Wechsler   www.mander-organs.com      
(back) Subject: Austin Organs From: "Harry Martenas" <harry.martenas@gmail.com> Date: Tue, 8 Mar 2005 19:59:38 -0500   Orpha Ochse wrote the definitive history of Austin Organ Company (formed 1899), and Austin Organs, Incorporated (formed 1937). Her book (rather substantial - 626 large pages, leather bound) was published by the Organ Historical Society in 2001.   Note the difference in names - Austin has closed before. See Ochse (ISBN 0-913499-18-8) pp 316-320.   I perhaps foolishly hope that it can be resurrected, once again, like a Phoenix rising from the ashes. The closing is amazingly ironic, given their cover feature in TAO, November 2004.- the largest instrument they have built since 1926 (according to the article).   Harry Martenas Bloomsburg, PA  
(back) Subject: Uses for old wood pipes From: "Keith Zimmerman" <kwzimmerman@alltel.net> Date: Tue, 8 Mar 2005 20:17:51 -0500   Guys,   This is probably nothing new. I was looking at the OSI catalog online and saw something about Organ Pipe CD Rack. Wondering what that was, I found out that it's a vertical CD storage rack that looks like a wood pipe. One can get a few of them together in a group.   For those who like to travel in motorhomes (where they always have arts = and crafts), I wonder if one could stain and varnish old wooden organ pipes to sell as various kinds of brick-a-brack displays.   Keith       -- No virus found in this outgoing message. Checked by AVG Anti-Virus. Version: 7.0.308 / Virus Database: 266.6.2 - Release Date: 3/4/2005    
(back) Subject: Londonderry Air From: "First Christian Church of Casey, IL" <kzrev@rr1.net> Date: Tue, 8 Mar 2005 20:06:45 -0600   The late Virgil Fox, on his album recorded on the Wichita Wurlitzer, = defined Londonderry Air as a "natural melody," and said something to the effect = that it was "one of the sweetest of all," and, in my book, proved it with his rendition.   Dennis Steckley Lover of Cats, Pipe Organs & 1940-65 Sewing Machines    
(back) Subject: Londonderry Air From: "Robert Lind" <lindr@core.com> Date: Tue, 8 Mar 2005 20:56:15 -0600   Augsburg Fortress published two albums of my organ music last year. In the 2nd one, entitled "Organ Images for Spring and Summer," one can find my setting of Londonderry Air, which I wrote at the editor's behest. It's entitled "O Christ the Same," and the hymn is # 778 in the 1995 ELCA supplement "With One Voice."   Oddly, I heard two renditions of Londonderry Air on WNIU in my car this morning on the way to church: Hamilton Harty's orchestral setting and Toru Takemitsu's arrangement for guitar.   Bob Lind--wondering if the Japanese surname "Takemitsu" has some Scandinavian in it :-)