PipeChat Digest #5214 - Monday, March 14, 2005
 
Re: ludwigtone
  by <Steskinner@aol.com>
ludwigtone
  by "Nathan Smith" <erzahler@sbcglobal.net>
Re: 8' trumpet
  by "Paul Smith" <kipsmith@getgoin.net>
Doubletalk: Ludwig und Doppel
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Re: organ music for Mothers' Day?
  by "Margo Dillard" <dillardm@airmail.net>
odd requests
  by "Charles Peery" <cepeery@earthlink.net>
Re: ludwigtone
  by <BlueeyedBear@aol.com>
Re: ludwigtone
  by <BlueeyedBear@aol.com>
Re: ludwigtone
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net>
Re: ludwigtone
  by "Charles & Maria DeVita-Krug" <cdkrug@worldnet.att.net>
Re: ludwigtone
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net>
=3D?UTF-8?Q?Dennis=3D20James=3D20=3DE2=3D80=3D93=3D20Harold=3D20Lloyd=3D2
  by <MUSCUR@aol.com>
REED TUNING QUESTION
  by "Randy Terry" <randy@peacham.homeip.net>
PipeChat IRC this evening,
  by "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca>
Re: ludwigtone
  by "Robert Lind" <lindr@core.com>
Re: REED TUNING QUESTION
  by <contrareed@aol.com>
Re: REED TUNING QUESTION
  by "Roy Redman" <rredman@imagin.net>
Re: REED TUNING QUESTION
  by "Charles Peery" <cepeery@earthlink.net>
Re: REED TUNING QUESTION
  by "Jim McFarland" <mcfarland6@juno.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: ludwigtone From: <Steskinner@aol.com> Date: Mon, 14 Mar 2005 06:56:35 EST   In a message dated 3/13/2005 10:43:16 PM Eastern Standard Time, BlueeyedBear@aol.com writes: has anyone ever heard a genuine ludwigtone? if so, does it sound = identical to a flute celeste, or are there differences in the sounds of the two? I heard one just the other day at Organ Supply Industries. It is a very gentle and hounting sound, very similar to a soft flute celeste.   For your situation however, it would be less iexpensive to add a 37-49 = note tierce.     Steven Skinner Minister of Music First Presbyterian Church of the Covenant Erie, PA  
(back) Subject: ludwigtone From: "Nathan Smith" <erzahler@sbcglobal.net> Date: Mon, 14 Mar 2005 07:37:13 -0500 (Eastern Standard Time)   >> yet it has an erzahler and erzahler celeste. i'd like to have the erzahler &=0D >>celeste replaced with a ludwigtone, thus leaving room for an additional rank=0D =0D Hello,=0D =0D I would suggest obtaining a pipe tray or two and placing the erzahle= r, celeste, stop knob/tab/tablet, and rack boards in a safe spot, so the cha= nge could be reversed.=0D =0D Best,=0D =0D Nathan
(back) Subject: Re: 8' trumpet From: "Paul Smith" <kipsmith@getgoin.net> Date: Mon, 14 Mar 2005 07:09:52 -0600     Sorry! My eye caught the wrong name. I was really asking you to expand = on your generalities. I was wondering if Moller had changed over the = years, and if their 1930s work used wire tuning more, since that is what = I have. Thanks for sharing your experience. I have no other source for = such specific information.=20 = Kip ----- Original Message -----=20 From: Jim McFarland=20 To: pipechat@pipechat.org=20 Sent: Sunday, March 13, 2005 9:26 PM Subject: Re: 8' trumpet     Kip in Mo or Paul Smith:   Was this question directed to Gary or to me?   Jim       On Sun, 13 Mar 2005 19:04:40 -0600 "Paul Smith" <kipsmith@getgoin.net> = writes: Gary - Since you are flying in the ether of generalities, could you = broaden out your comments and mention which periods or types of reed = pipes this might apply to. I have several reeds from the "Golden Age" ( = 1920s and 1930s) which have been around the block. The sound of the 16' = Waldhorns (Kilgen) is very uneven, and I am curious if starting over = from scratch would help. Thanks, Kip in Mo ----- Original Message -----=20 From: Jim McFarland=20 To: pipechat@pipechat.org=20 Sent: Sunday, March 13, 2005 4:45 PM Subject: Re: 8' trumpet     Gary:   What I say here applies to some, but not all reeds. I am also = speaking in glittering generalities, if you have more specific = questions, please voice them.   A trumpet from that vintage M=F6ller was constructed and voiced = with the intent that it be tuned on the scroll and not the wire. That = being said, if the stop was moved, and stored etc, it is likely that the = wires were disturbed, and therefore the first tuning should be on the = wire.   If all things are as they should be, the wire is used only for = regulating.   Within a fairly narrow margin, the stop can be made louder by = opening the scroll a little, and knocking the wire up until each note is = in tune. (The inverse holds true) If previous tuners have been careless = with the scrolls and scrolled them down too far, then you could have = trouble with "leaking scrolls." Scrolls that are weak from rolling down = too far, will adversely affect the speech and tuning stability.   Usually the scrolls "live" between one and two scroll widths down = from closed. In other words, if the scroll is one inch wide, the = opening above it will be from one inch to two inches long.   If the stop is hopelessly out of regulation, and you need to = figure out where to start, you can try this. Place all scrolls about one = scroll width from the top. If the scroll seams are erratic, wavy, or = just peeled open too far, then temporarily tape them up with masking = tape. On each pipe, knock the wire down slowly while the note is = playing, and stop when the note begins to choke. At this point, knock = it back up a little bit, and finish tuning on the scroll. In no = instance should you tear into new metal while scrolling down. Once you = have done this, go back and try to even things out.   Remove the tape before it makes a mess on the pipe. If you have = scrolls which are still rolled "way up" compared to how long the seams = are open, let me know, and I will try to help you with that problem   This whole process is really not something that should be = attempted by the untrained and inexperienced. I offer these suggestions = only because they might be used by an amateur on HIS OWN house organ.     Jim               On Sun, 13 Mar 2005 13:20:32 -0600 "GB" <gblack@ocslink.com> = writes: HI list, I have a question. I have installed my 8' trumpet in = my residence organ. I tuned it and what a sound! It is from a Moller = organ from about 1986. What are the scrolls for on the bells of the = pipes and what do I do with them? Thanks, Gary    
(back) Subject: Doubletalk: Ludwig und Doppel From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Mon, 14 Mar 2005 09:08:37 EST   There is no similarity between a Doppelflote and a Ludwigtone, other = than possessing mouths on opposing sides and featuring timber construction. Doppelfloten often have sunken blocks, with standard mouths (bevels on =   the outsides of the pipe faces). They are stopped, and the pipes are = single, undivided air columns. The Ludwigtone is divided into TWO chambers, both open OPEN, with "INVERTED" or internal mouth bevels. They are tuned at the top with metal = scrolls so that the two sides may be adjusted for beat.   Sebastian M. Gluck New York City http://www.glucknewyork.com/  
(back) Subject: Re: organ music for Mothers' Day? From: "Margo Dillard" <dillardm@airmail.net> Date: Mon, 14 Mar 2005 08:10:59 -0600   you've got to be kidding - I had a wedding ask for "having my baby" a number of years ago - you mean there were actually TWO weddings with such lack of taste... (would have been really interesting if it had been allowed - they wanted it for a surprise, since neither family knew she was pregnant - and this was long enough ago that it was still "not done")...   The best one I ever knew of that actually happened was the wedding of 2 divorcees that had "Love is better the second time around" as the song before the wedding march...   Margo   Keys4bach@aol.com wrote: > In a message dated 3/13/2005 7:04:19 P.M. Eastern Standard Time, > ravenrockdesigns@gmail.com writes: > > Thats real tasteful, Dale. . . . . how 'bout writing a new Choral > Prelude simply entitled "Mutter"? > > i only wrote it because it was the WORST request i ever had for a > wedding in 1973.... > > and the list has been a little dry..... > > would that be stabat mutter? > > dale in Florida whom apologizes if he offended anyone..........was not > intended > riding high from huge cantata event at church over weekend. >     -- Dr. Margo Dillard Organist, FUMC, Lewisville, TX Musical Feast Choral Society Dillard Piano & Organ Studio    
(back) Subject: odd requests From: "Charles Peery" <cepeery@earthlink.net> Date: Mon, 14 Mar 2005 08:18:38 -0500   LOL, I was at the local music store Saturday, a panic trip to buy an Orgelbuchlein when I couldn't find mine after moving to St. Louis, and I had a request for several of the pieces for a funeral today. The guy at the store laughed and said "Well, it could be worse, I once had a guy call in for a funeral request and ask me if we had the piece 'Looks like we almost made it, didn't we girl?'".....   Chuck Peery St. Louis    
(back) Subject: Re: ludwigtone From: <BlueeyedBear@aol.com> Date: Mon, 14 Mar 2005 10:21:58 EST   In a message dated 3/13/05 8:35:07 PM Pacific Standard Time, ProOrgo53@aol.com writes:   > >> my choir has a nasard, but no tierce > > > Strangest thing! My choir has a 'nasard' (actually ours is a "nazard") = in > the alto section. And, I'm fortunate to also have a "tierce." He sings = a > robust bass! >   well, you should hear my choir's quint! his name? QUINTEN!  
(back) Subject: Re: ludwigtone From: <BlueeyedBear@aol.com> Date: Mon, 14 Mar 2005 10:23:05 EST   In a message dated 3/14/05 3:57:07 AM Pacific Standard Time, Steskinner@aol.com writes:   > I heard one just the other day at Organ Supply Industries. It is a very =   > gentle and hounting sound, very similar to a soft flute celeste. > > For your situation however, it would be less iexpensive to add a 37-49 = note > tierce. >   you misunderstand... i want BOTH! :)  
(back) Subject: Re: ludwigtone From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net> Date: Mon, 14 Mar 2005 09:53:07 -0600   And does your Quint have a wife named Adena? What you don't want is a = Spitzquint -- they can be messy.   John Speller ----- Original Message -----=20 From: BlueeyedBear@aol.com=20 To: pipechat@pipechat.org=20 Sent: Monday, March 14, 2005 9:21 AM Subject: Re: ludwigtone     In a message dated 3/13/05 8:35:07 PM Pacific Standard Time, = ProOrgo53@aol.com writes:     my choir has a nasard, but no tierce       Strangest thing! My choir has a 'nasard' (actually ours is a = "nazard") in the alto section. And, I'm fortunate to also have a = "tierce." He sings a robust bass!       well, you should hear my choir's quint! his name? QUINTEN!
(back) Subject: Re: ludwigtone From: "Charles & Maria DeVita-Krug" <cdkrug@worldnet.att.net> Date: Mon, 14 Mar 2005 12:12:14 -0500   On Mon, Mar 14, 2005 at 10:21:58AM -0500, BlueeyedBear@aol.com wrote: > In a message dated 3/13/05 8:35:07 PM Pacific Standard Time, > ProOrgo53@aol.com writes: > > > >> my choir has a nasard, but no tierce > > > > > > Strangest thing! My choir has a 'nasard' (actually ours is a = "nazard") in > > the alto section. And, I'm fortunate to also have a "tierce." He = sings a > > robust bass! > > > > well, you should hear my choir's quint! his name? QUINTEN!   Our choir has a Soprano who self-celestes, and not always in a good way.   Maybe she needs her sleeve adjusted.    
(back) Subject: Re: ludwigtone From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net> Date: Mon, 14 Mar 2005 11:44:13 -0600   Sounds to me that she is more like a Tremolo than a Celeste. Probably fitting a concussion bellows ("winker") to her chest would help stabilize her wind.   John Speller   ----- Original Message ----- From: "Charles & Maria DeVita-Krug" <cdkrug@worldnet.att.net> To: <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Monday, March 14, 2005 11:12 AM Subject: Re: ludwigtone     > On Mon, Mar 14, 2005 at 10:21:58AM -0500, BlueeyedBear@aol.com wrote: > > In a message dated 3/13/05 8:35:07 PM Pacific Standard Time, > > ProOrgo53@aol.com writes: > > > > > >> my choir has a nasard, but no tierce > > > > > > > > > Strangest thing! My choir has a 'nasard' (actually ours is a "nazard") in > > > the alto section. And, I'm fortunate to also have a "tierce." He sings a > > > robust bass! > > > > > > > well, you should hear my choir's quint! his name? QUINTEN! > > Our choir has a Soprano who self-celestes, and not always in a good way. > > Maybe she needs her sleeve adjusted.      
(back) Subject: =3D?UTF-8?Q?Dennis=3D20James=3D20=3DE2=3D80=3D93=3D20Harold=3D20Lloyd=3D20?=3D =3D?UTF-8?Q?=3DE2=3D80=3D93=3D20TONIGHT=3D20in=3MUSCUR@aol.com=3D20?=3D From: <MUSCUR@aol.com> Date: Mon, 14 Mar 2005 14:28:23 EST   =20 Harold Lloyd=E2=80=99s first full length feature film, GRANDMA=E2=80=99S BO= Y accompanied by=20 theatre organist Dennis James at the Uptown Theatre in downtown Calgary=20 tonight at 7 p.m.=20 Silent films have been brought to life in Calgary since 1998 at Cantos=20 Silent Movie Mondays. Attendees are once again experience the nostalgic thr= ill of=20 an era gone with Silent Movie Mondays annual return to The Uptown Stage &=20 Screen (612 =E2=80=93 8 Avenue SW) throughout March. In a dramatic fusion o= f present and=20 past, world-renowned theatre organist Dennis James masters the Cantos=20 Theatre Organ bringing this series of classic black and white films to life= .. Silent=20 Movie Mondays is one of Calgary=E2=80=99s most eclectic events with attende= es from a=20 diverse cross-section of society. Seniors are a key part of the audience. I= n=20 fact, a delightful 84-year old woman at a 2004 screening was very excited t= o=20 see one of the films. As a small child she had attended the film with her=20 family but was too young to stay awake to see the ending. She finally got t= o=20 see the ending! On the other end of the spectrum, the films are well attend= ed=20 by "goths", the urban sub-culture predominantly made up of youths who dress= in=20 the gothic style celebrating vampires, darkness and gothic creatures and=20 literature. And film-buffs of all ages are always first in line to get tick= ets.=20 Last week=E2=80=99s opener, Buster Keaton=E2=80=99s COLLEGE, in this year= =E2=80=99s all-comedy=20 festival was a complete sellout, continuing the sellouts at all shows that=20= began=20 at the Uptown=E2=80=99s silents series two years ago. Tonight=E2=80=99s pr= ogram will have=20 the added attraction of a Charlie Chaplin Mutual Comedy, EASY STREET (1916)= ,=20 also shown from a pristine 35mm preserved print at the historically correct= =20 18 fps film speed. Next up is Clara Bow in IT (with Chaplin=E2=80=99s THE=20= IMMIGRANT)=20 and the series closer on March 28 is MGM=E2=80=99s comedy classic SHOW PEOP= LE (1928)=20 featuring Marion Davies together with Charlie Chaplin, Douglas Fairbanks, W= M.=20 S. Hart, John Gilbert, and many other silent film stars of the 1920=E2=80= =99s.=20 Dennis James has more than 35 years experience as a world-renowned theatre=20 organist. He played a pivotal role in the international revival of silent=20 films featuring live music. He toured extensively with silent film stars Li= llian=20 Gish and Charles 'Buddy' Rogers throughout the 1980's providing musical=20 accompaniment to revivals of their motion pictures. In addition to his sile= nt film=20 performance activities, Dennis James is also dedicated to furthering public= =20 interest in the pipe organ and to the continuation of the theatrical=20 traditions of organ performance. The Cantos Theatre Organ is an impressive=20 instrument. And seeing and hearing Dennis James in action on this amazing t= heatre organ=20 is truly a feast for the senses. It is the first of its kind in Canada =E2= =80=93 a=20 four-manual, 28-rank, fully digital organ, the most sophisticated theatre=20 organ replica available=20 Now in its eight year, the Cantos Foundation =E2=80=98Silent Movie Mondays= =E2=80=99=20 featuring Dennis James at the Uptown began as a part of the prestigious Cal= gary=20 International Organ Festival in 1998, the Silent Film Concerts series has e= volved=20 into an annual month-long series at the historic Art Deco embellished=20 theatre. This year the four manual organ console has been relocated to cent= er =20 orchestra pit bringing it to central focus directly under the 35mm projected= film=20 image. All of the film prints are shown at their historically correct film= =20 speeds and in authentic silent film presentation aperture format.=20 Advance tickets for the Cantos Music Foundation=E2=80=99s unique Silent Mov= ie=20 Mondays are on sale now and can be purchased by phoning (403) 543-5115. Ti= ckets=20 are $14 for adults, $12 for students and seniors, and $8 for children under= 12=20 years of age. Tickets will be available at the Uptown on the day of the sho= w=20 (subject to availability).=20 Listing sent from: =20 Silent Film Concerts PO Box 2072 Tacoma, Washington 98401-2072 USA 253-573-1683=20 To be deleted from this mailing list, please respond with e-mail request=20 containing REMOVE in the subject heading and sent to _muscur@aol.com_=20 (mailto:muscur@aol.com) =20    
(back) Subject: REED TUNING QUESTION From: "Randy Terry" <randy@peacham.homeip.net> Date: Mon, 14 Mar 2005 07:49:46 -0800     Is there any way to tell by looking at a pipe how it should be tuned?   I once helped someone tune a Ruffatti in Mississippi in the 80's and = someone had placed a note on the inside of the swell door warning us to tune with the scroll not the wire.   I played a 1985 Moller unit organ for two years and the thing had been buggered with so much that the scrolls have been all the way down at some point. To get the notes sounding "right," not too bright or too dull, we had to use duct tape to seal a few pipes that wouldn't stabilize.   In my two of three recent positions, the job descriptions stated that the organists were to be able to carry out basic repairs on the organ, which I read as "spot tuning." Personally, I don't think an organist's training = is complete without the ability to knock a reed into tune, and spot-tune = where needed, but for me this is a new question and perhaps relevant to all.   Would it not help to include a brief "how to?" in the service manuals builders often leave at the console for organists? Certainly a note to = tune via the scrolls or wires inside the organ would be helpful.   I know that many techs and builders advise to lock the organ off for everyone but the service personnel, but I've found that often organ = chambers are left unlocked and easier to get to than the console!   +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ Randy Terry Music Minister The Episcopal Church of St. Peter Redwood City, California      
(back) Subject: PipeChat IRC this evening, From: "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca> Date: Mon, 14 Mar 2005 15:06:16 -0500   All members of PipeChat are invited to join us in the PipeChat IRC any Friday and Monday evening - beginning at 9.00 PM Eastern Time.   To find out more about the Chat room, or how to get into it, go to PipeChat-L web page at http://www.pipechat.org/   You will find out all you need to know to join us.   Tonight at 9.00 PM, - I hope that we will see you there.   Cheers,   Bob Conway     ****************************************************************** "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org>       ****************************************************************** "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org>      
(back) Subject: Re: ludwigtone From: "Robert Lind" <lindr@core.com> Date: Mon, 14 Mar 2005 14:08:43 -0600   Does supporting her tone from the diaphragm also help?   Bob Lind   ----- Original Message ----- From: John L. Speller <jlspeller@swbell.net> To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Monday, March 14, 2005 11:44 AM Subject: Re: ludwigtone     > Sounds to me that she is more like a Tremolo than a Celeste. Probably > fitting a concussion bellows ("winker") to her chest would help = stabilize > her wind. > > John Speller    
(back) Subject: Re: REED TUNING QUESTION From: <contrareed@aol.com> Date: Mon, 14 Mar 2005 16:50:25 -0500   -----Original Message----- From: Randy Terry <randy@peacham.homeip.net> To: 'PipeChat' <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Mon, 14 Mar 2005 07:49:46 -0800 Subject: REED TUNING QUESTION       Geez, I had a whole answer formulated to this subject heading and ws ready to write about tuning bassoon reeds, and then looked at what group it was from. I'm glad I didn't bore you all with talk about wires and blade thickness and tube shape and dimensions in 16th of an inch, etc. Richard  
(back) Subject: Re: REED TUNING QUESTION From: "Roy Redman" <rredman@imagin.net> Date: Mon, 14 Mar 2005 03:10:53 -0600   Many of you know that Homer Lewis made reed pipes for Moller, and then = started TRIVO with Joe Clip and Alf Zajic. I once asked Homer the "wire or scroll" question, and his answer was an = obvious "both". Obviously, one cannot tune and keep in regulation, reeds without = both control of tongue length and resonator length. Shortening the resonator, = or increasing the tongue length is like opening your mouth wider while = singing. Both pitch and tonality must be considered. With dead length resonators, = one can sometimes adjust the operating length of the shallot, or the position = of the tongue. That said, we have all seen many reed pipes ruined because of = endless up and down adjustment of the scrolls because of temperature changes. If the pitch of reed pipes must be changed greatly because of temperature = (not a good idea in the first place) then the wire and the scroll must both be adjusted. If you make the scroll do it all, you are sure to change the = tone of the reed, and well as ruin the tuner for stability. If the needed change = is small, sometimes you can do it with with scroll only adjustment. Please = avoid ruining the scrolls just because they are sometimes easier to reach than = the wires! Roy Redman   Randy Terry wrote:   > Is there any way to tell by looking at a pipe how it should be tuned? > > I once helped someone tune a Ruffatti in Mississippi in the 80's and = someone > had placed a note on the inside of the swell door warning us to tune = with > the scroll not the wire. > > I played a 1985 Moller unit organ for two years and the thing had been > buggered with so much that the scrolls have been all the way down at = some > point. To get the notes sounding "right," not too bright or too dull, = we > had to use duct tape to seal a few pipes that wouldn't stabilize. > > In my two of three recent positions, the job descriptions stated that = the > organists were to be able to carry out basic repairs on the organ, which = I > read as "spot tuning." Personally, I don't think an organist's training = is > complete without the ability to knock a reed into tune, and spot-tune = where > needed, but for me this is a new question and perhaps relevant to all. > > Would it not help to include a brief "how to?" in the service manuals > builders often leave at the console for organists? Certainly a note to = tune > via the scrolls or wires inside the organ would be helpful. > > I know that many techs and builders advise to lock the organ off for > everyone but the service personnel, but I've found that often organ = chambers > are left unlocked and easier to get to than the console! > > +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ > Randy Terry > Music Minister > The Episcopal Church of St. Peter > Redwood City, California > > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org>    
(back) Subject: Re: REED TUNING QUESTION From: "Charles Peery" <cepeery@earthlink.net> Date: Mon, 14 Mar 2005 16:22:39 -0500   I have never spot tuned reeds, and I was always kicking myself because I should be able to crawl up there and fix a note or two.   Yet the things being said are actually discouraging me from trying it... and yet I thought people did it all the time. When I was choir director and not organist, the organist would take a table knife, crawl in there and just whack the heck out of the wire until the note sounded better. And all these years I thought that was right. I guess I'm glad I never tried it! I'd be the type of person for which an upward thwack would result in the pipe flying out into the Nave and crashing down in three pieces.   Is there a more specific chain of instruction than "sometimes wire, sometimes scroll and PLEASE DON'T SCREW UP THE PIPES" ???   Chuck Peery St. Louis    
(back) Subject: Re: REED TUNING QUESTION From: "Jim McFarland" <mcfarland6@juno.com> Date: Mon, 14 Mar 2005 17:49:01 -0500     On Mon, 14 Mar 2005 03:10:53 -0600 Roy Redman <rredman@imagin.net> writes: > Many of you know that Homer Lewis made reed pipes for M=F6ller, and > then started > TRIVO with Joe Clip and Alf Zajic. > I once asked Homer the "wire or scroll" question, and his answer was > an obvious > "both".       Roy:   Very interesting. Of course if you ask Rick Morrison (who was head reed voicer at M=F6ller toward the end), he will tell you "on the scroll" for most M=F6ller reeds. In fact he is known to say "leave the wire alone, unless it has been disturbed." I know a number of M=F6ller service men = who will tell you the same.   I learned tuning from two Skinner men who had been there since the beginning. (In fact they worked with him at Hutchings first!) We all know that Skinner reeds will stay in tune and track reasonably with the flues, if you leave the wires alone. If there is a reason to move the scroll more than a scroll-width then something is wrong! We have many Skinners in which all the scrolls are in good shape, and they have never been tuned on the wire!   We maintain nearly two hundred organs in Central Pennsylvania,. Those that have reeds meant to be tuned on the scroll (as any Schantz, Skinner, Aeolian-Skinner, and most M=F6ller men will tell you) stay in tune remarkably well, year around! If we have a church that is 95 degrees in the summer and 65 degrees in the winter, we have the organists trained to accept the out-of-tuneness on those awful dog days (there are relatively few) in trade for having reeds in good tune most of the rest of the time. We once had an organist insist on retuning the reeds in severely hot weather. In this instance we, of course, tuned on the wire. When it was time to tune again, we tuned on the wire again. All subsequent tunings were on the scroll mostly, but constant tweaking of the wire was necessary. It was about three years until those reeds settled down and started staying in tune again.   All Schantz reps are told to tune on the scroll only, except in certain circumstances. All Skinner reps were told the same.   Of course none of this applies to most Continental European reeds.   American voxes and other specialty reeds are generally wire-tuned.   I have yet to see a clarinet unhappy that is tuned on the collar!   If the reed goes out of regulation from scroll manipulation, run it half way back and adjust on the wire. The next time you tune on the scroll it will probably be fine.   The sheer number of examples we work with on a yearly basis act to proves our methods.     Jim