PipeChat Digest #5215 - Tuesday, March 15, 2005
 
just testing
  by "Bob Elms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au>
Reed destruction and bad tuning practices
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
RE: ludwigtone
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
Re: ludwigtone
  by <ProOrgo53@aol.com>
Re: Reed destruction and bad tuning practices
  by "Jim McFarland" <mcfarland6@juno.com>
Re: Reed destruction and bad tuning practices
  by "Tim Bovard" <tmbovard@earthlink.net>
Not scrolling the scroll ... causing a flap
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Re: Not scrolling the scroll ... causing a flap
  by "Jim McFarland" <mcfarland6@juno.com>
The Organ Symphonie
  by "Jonathan Orwig" <giwro@adelphia.net>
Re: organ music for mother's day?
  by <Myosotis51@aol.com>
 

(back) Subject: just testing From: "Bob Elms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au> Date: Tue, 15 Mar 2005 07:34:01 +0800   Test message. Please ignore. BE.     -- No virus found in this outgoing message. Checked by AVG Anti-Virus. Version: 7.0.308 / Virus Database: 266.7.2 - Release Date: 11/03/2005    
(back) Subject: Reed destruction and bad tuning practices From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Mon, 14 Mar 2005 19:12:08 EST   In the past two decades, I have seen countless thousands of dollars in =   damage done to reeds by tuning on the scrolls. When we have taken over = certain tuning contracts, we have had to remove dozens of pipes and have them go = to the pipe shop for scroll repairs, and even replacements. Sometimes we have had = to do an entire rank over because of butchered scrolls. I have seen no damage done by tuning on the wires. Damage CAN be done with the wires in two ways: (a) an amateur whacks = the wire all the way down, slipping it off the shallot, and yanking it up so = that it bends the reeds; (b) a tuning wire is made with too fierce a spring, = and the constant moving of it up and down in the same location tends to = recurve the reed in that area, throwing it off speech. The answer truly is "both," with the qualification that it must be = done by a qualified practitioner, who knows what to do and when. A good tuner = will also know when the temperature shift in a building is so severe that it is = best to let the reeds lie fallow for the season and not schedule recitals or = make attempts to repitch the reeds.   Sebastian M. Gluck New York City http://www.glucknewyork.com/ ..  
(back) Subject: RE: ludwigtone From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Mon, 14 Mar 2005 18:30:38 -0600   Wouldn't that hurt?   Couldn't resist - I'm in hiding now.   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com     -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of Robert Lind   Does supporting her tone from the diaphragm also help?   Bob Lind   ----- Original Message ----- From: John L. Speller <jlspeller@swbell.net> To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org>     > Sounds to me that she is more like a Tremolo than a Celeste. Probably > fitting a concussion bellows ("winker") to her chest would help stabilize > her wind.        
(back) Subject: Re: ludwigtone From: <ProOrgo53@aol.com> Date: Mon, 14 Mar 2005 20:02:50 EST   In a message dated 3/14/2005 6:43:34 P.M. Central Standard Time, gksjd85@direcway.com writes:   Couldn't resist - I'm in hiding now.       Don't stay in hiding long! Hope the new job is going smooth as silk - - = - and no camera persons anywhere in sight. I hope you carry a pretty hefty =   purse. See another camera-person (politically correct, you know!), give = 'em a good "strike" with your purse! No-violently, of course!! Dale  
(back) Subject: Re: Reed destruction and bad tuning practices From: "Jim McFarland" <mcfarland6@juno.com> Date: Mon, 14 Mar 2005 21:01:18 -0500   Sebastian:   For the first time, I am going to "somewhat" disagree with you.     On Mon, 14 Mar 2005 19:12:08 EST TubaMagna@aol.com writes: > In the past two decades, I have seen countless thousands of > dollars in damage done to reeds by tuning on the scrolls. When we have taken > over certain tuning contracts, we have had to remove dozens of pipes and have > them go to the pipe shop for scroll repairs, and even replacements.     Seb: We have encountered the same. Careless scroll tuning does real damage. We have soldered many scrolls shut in order to cut new ones 1/4 or 1/2 way around the pipe. But then, when it is called for, we have begun tuning that same rank on the scroll.   There are countless ranks of reeds out there that I have personally tuned on the scroll for longer than you have been on this planet. Properly done, the scrolls seem to last indefinitely. We never attempt to move a scroll more then one scroll width without stopping to discover what is amiss. Tuning on the scroll when something else is wrong, is what does the damage. This is where the bit about "both" comes into play. Sometimes the wire has simply moved a bit.   Other times, the fault is a loose wedge, or piece of dirt. We would no sooner go banging on a flue pipe collar or (heaven forbid) with a tuning cone, without inspecting the pipe for something amiss.   I have never intimated that all reeds can or should be tuned on the resonator. It is simply a fact that some reeds are more stable when tuned there. It is a fact that Schantz reps and M=F6ller reps were instructed by the factory voicers to tune most reeds on the resonator. We have always tuned the majority of Austin and Reuter reeds this way as well. We also tune the majority of symphonic reeds this way.   The hundreds of ranks we have been tuning this way for over forty years do not lie. The scrolls are in good shape and the tuning is stable. When we arrive to tune, the reeds are either dead-in or mildly celesting. A simple nudge of the scroll is all that is required to tune them.   It looks as though I stand somewhat alone on the list, until someone else speaks up?     Jim  
(back) Subject: Re: Reed destruction and bad tuning practices From: "Tim Bovard" <tmbovard@earthlink.net> Date: Mon, 14 Mar 2005 20:21:08 -0600   At 08:01 PM 3/14/2005, Jim wrote: >It looks as though I stand somewhat alone on the list, until someone else >speaks up?     Count me with you, Jim. I concur with everything you've written -- also Roy and Sebastian. Thank you all for the good advice.   --Tim (Nichols & Simspon, Inc.)      
(back) Subject: Not scrolling the scroll ... causing a flap From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Mon, 14 Mar 2005 21:42:43 EST   The real question is how to get people to know their limitations when = it comes to what they can and should do inside an instrument. A really stable treatment is to cut the flap (whatever margin you want =   from the top of the resonator, some fraction of the diameter), making the = width of the scored flap a particular fraction of the diameter as well. Gently prying the flap outward, WITHOUT rolling it into a tight scroll, makes the =   resonator adjustable without creating a huge bucket, brash harmonics, or = effectively rescaling and shortening the resonator. If the reed is properly curved and has a good tuning range, then = moving the flap in or out a millimeter or three is not going to weaken the metal, = and the resonator is more likely to ring closer to dead-length, with stronger fundamental and more stability.   Sebastian M. Gluck New York City http://www.glucknewyork.com/  
(back) Subject: Re: Not scrolling the scroll ... causing a flap From: "Jim McFarland" <mcfarland6@juno.com> Date: Mon, 14 Mar 2005 21:49:49 -0500     On Mon, 14 Mar 2005 21:42:43 EST TubaMagna@aol.com writes:   > A really stable treatment is to cut the flap (whatever margin > you want from the top of the resonator, some fraction of the diameter),     snip   > > resonator adjustable without creating a huge bucket, brash > harmonics, or effectively > rescaling and shortening the resonator.   Seb:   Skinner, M=F6ller, and others made the resonator somewhat overlength to accommodate having a scroll without harmonically altering the tone.   Jim  
(back) Subject: The Organ Symphonie From: "Jonathan Orwig" <giwro@adelphia.net> Date: Mon, 14 Mar 2005 20:30:20 -0800   Dear friends,   Many of you know of my ongoing research about organ Symphonies. Many of you have also been very helpful with sharing information and helping track down scores and recordings.   I'm pleased to offer my first entry for your reading pleasure:   http://www.evensongmusic.net/pdf/Labole.pdf   As the work is finished, it will be posted to the internet as a free resource - see: http://www.evensongmusic.net/pdf/intro.pdf for the introduction = page   I hope this will become a good resource for research, and I welcome additions and corrections from you all. Within the next few months, the book will have its own site and become a permanent fixture on the internet. I'm writing as I continue to gather information, so the entries will not necessarily appear in alphabetical order, but will come in whatever order I find pleasing to me!   Best to all,   --   Jonathan Orwig Evensong Music, Media and Graphics New Organ Music http://www.evensongmusic.net    
(back) Subject: Re: organ music for mother's day? From: <Myosotis51@aol.com> Date: Tue, 15 Mar 2005 00:23:23 EST   Hello BlueeyedBear@aol.com,     In reference to your comment: i'm planning a recital that just might take place on mother's day. any suggestions as to what relevant organ music i might include? ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~   Why, whatever YOUR mother wants you to play of course.   And followed by dinner at a nice restaurant!   Victoria