PipeChat Digest #5221 - Sunday, March 20, 2005
 
Re: both a Baptismal Pool and a Crucifix in the same church?
  by "Bob Elms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au>
Palm Sunday music
  by <BlueeyedBear@aol.com>
Palm Sunday - Covenant Sunday - Northminster Church
  by "Sand Lawn" <glawn@jam.rr.com>
Re: both a Baptismal Pool and a Crucifix in the same church?
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: both a Baptismal Pool and a Crucifix in the same church?
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: both a Baptismal Pool and a Crucifix in the same church?
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: both a Baptismal Pool and a Crucifix in the same church?
  by "Charles & Maria DeVita-Krug" <cdkrug@worldnet.att.net>
Joyce Jones
  by "Merry Foxworth" <m.foxworth@verizon.net>
Red Bank Palm Sunday Music (x post)
  by <Innkawgneeto@cs.com>
Re: both a Baptismal Pool and a Crucifix in the same church?
  by "John Seboldt" <rohrwerk@seboldt.net>
Re: PipeChat Digest #5220 - 03/20/05
  by <SWF12262@aol.com>
Re: Red Bank Palm Sunday Music (x post)
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net>
 

(back) Subject: Re: both a Baptismal Pool and a Crucifix in the same church? From: "Bob Elms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au> Date: Sun, 20 Mar 2005 18:38:32 +0800   I have not seen any baptismal pools in West Australian churches except for =   the Baptists and the Church of Christ. The Roman Catholic Church where I play occasionally there is a rock with water flowing over and a dish below =   from which the priest dips to sprinkle. It is a modern building however ( about 1993).   I have seen baptisms conducted by some churches by immersion in the = river. In fact my father (Methodist Minister) conducted an adult baptism in the Swan River at Fremantle in the 1940s. I have seen baptismal services being =   carried out in the harbour in my town. Fortunately pollution is well under =   control here and so there is no health risk. Bob Elms.   ----- Original Message ----- From: "Will Light" <will.light@btinternet.com> To: "'PipeChat'" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Sunday, March 20, 2005 3:38 PM Subject: RE: both a Baptismal Pool and a Crucifix in the same church?     In the UK only Baptist churches have baptismal pools as far as I know - Tony, is this correct? A newly converted Christian at my sister's Methodist church in Cornwall wanted to affirm their faith by being baptized by total immersion, but the church has no pool, so they held the service at my sister's farm, using = the swimming pool!         -- No virus found in this outgoing message. Checked by AVG Anti-Virus. Version: 7.0.308 / Virus Database: 266.7.4 - Release Date: 18/03/2005    
(back) Subject: Palm Sunday music From: <BlueeyedBear@aol.com> Date: Sun, 20 Mar 2005 15:01:33 EST   Westminster Congregational UCC, Spokane:   prelude: March on a Theme of Handel, Alexandre Guilmant   choral call to worship: Rejoice Ye Pure in Heart   hymns: At the Name of Jesus (King's Weston) Ah, Holy Jesus (Herzliebster Jesu)   offertory: My Song is Love Unknown, John Ireland   solo: Mache Dich, fr. St. Matthew Passion (baritone, english horn, organ), J.S. Bach   postlude: Jesus Walked This Lonesome Valley (english horn & organ), arr. Roger = Wilson    
(back) Subject: Palm Sunday - Covenant Sunday - Northminster Church From: "Sand Lawn" <glawn@jam.rr.com> Date: Sun, 20 Mar 2005 17:13:18 -0600   Today was a dual-purpose Sunday.... Northminster's 15th Anniversary and = Palm Sunday .....   Northminster Church (Baptist) - Monroe, LA   The Preludes (based on ST. THEODOLPH Chorale Prelude - J.S.Bach Partita - Jan Bender Prologue - Hosannah! - D.H.Clark Summons to Holy Week Introit - Blessed is he who comes - D.H.Clark Gospel Reading Processional Hymn - "All Glory Laud and Honor - ST.THEODOLPH Prayer of Confession An Epistle Reading The Voluntary - Sonta, #7, 2nd Movement - Haydn The Litany of the Covenant A Gospel Reading Affirmation of Covenant Hymn - Sing, Te Deum - NORTHMINSTER TE DEUM Sermon Anthem - "They Did Not Build in Vain" - Alfred V. Fedak Invitation to Communion A Gospel Reading Pastoral Prayer Distribution of the Elements The Communion Meditation - "Pie Jesus" - Requiem Andrew Lloyd Webber Doxology - OLD HUNDREDTH Recessional Hymn - God, You Have Set Us On Our Way NATIONAL HYMN An Epistle Reading "The People Depart in Silence"   And they people actually did depart in silence ....<s>   Sand Lawn  
(back) Subject: Re: both a Baptismal Pool and a Crucifix in the same church? From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Sun, 20 Mar 2005 18:22:53 +0000   On 3/19/05 6:46 PM, "Charlie Lester" <crl@137.com> wrote (first citing an unattributed source):   >> does it strike anyone else that it's rather odd to have both a = Baptismal Pool >> and a Crucifix in the same church? <-=3D > > Perhaps. If so, then similarly odd is the new Cathedral of Our Lady of = the > Angels in Los Angeles which also has both. As do quite a few other = edifices of > religiosity.   Among them St. Peter's (ELCA) and (as needed) St. Joseph's RC, both in Manhattan. Oh, also the RC Cathedral of the Madeleine, Salt Lake City. = And I'm sure whole bunch more.   Alan    
(back) Subject: Re: both a Baptismal Pool and a Crucifix in the same church? From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Sun, 20 Mar 2005 18:34:10 +0000   On 3/20/05 2:35 AM, "Jan Nijhuis" <nijhuis@email.com> wrote:   > The obvious answer is that the traditional baptism or christening in the = Roman > Catholic churches is by sprinkling, not immersion   I'm no authority, but I think rather by pouring rather than by sprinkling. But even with that adjustment, I think you'd have to say "one of the traditional. . . ." (And skip that thing about "christening." That's for ships=8Busing champagne.)   Alan    
(back) Subject: Re: both a Baptismal Pool and a Crucifix in the same church? From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Sun, 20 Mar 2005 18:42:45 +0000   On 3/20/05 10:38 AM, "Bob Elms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au> wrote:   > The Roman Catholic Church where I play occasionally there is a rock with = water > flowing over and a dish below from which the priest dips to sprinkle.   Or, perhaps more likely, "to pour." I think they call it "trine = affusion."   Alan Freed    
(back) Subject: Re: both a Baptismal Pool and a Crucifix in the same church? From: "Charles & Maria DeVita-Krug" <cdkrug@worldnet.att.net> Date: Sun, 20 Mar 2005 19:33:10 -0500   On Sun, Mar 20, 2005 at 10:35:45AM +0800, Jan Nijhuis wrote: > In reply to Ross, > > Now back to topic: Can a speaking pipe really be made from (stock) > Legos? -- a set of pitched pipes? It would be a much greater effort > than even the Harpsichord mentioned earlier, and might have similar > musical results.     I'm not sure how you'd manage the mouth. Probably want to make the foot-to-mouth out of metal or conventional wood.   But I suspect so long as some effort went to sealing it, it would work as a resonator.    
(back) Subject: Joyce Jones From: "Merry Foxworth" <m.foxworth@verizon.net> Date: Sun, 20 Mar 2005 20:56:00 -0500   <<And the encore was received extremely well, a charming piece that explored the organ's less commonly used stops, including the chimes. I remember she once said she liked to use a harp on this number, but don't know what she substituted.<<   I heard her a few years ago at the Worcester AGO convention, where she told us how the harp stop on a certain organ where she played a recital "paid fo= r the farm"!!!! Merry     =B4=A8=A8)) -:=A6:- =B8.=B7=B4 .=B7=B4=A8=A8)) ((=B8=B8.=B7=B4 ..=B7=B4 -:=A6:-   An excerpt from Robert Giddings "Musical Quotes and Anecdotes", published in Longman Pocket Companions: "There let the pealing organ blow, To the full-voiced choir below, In service high, and anthems clear, As may with sweetness, through mine ear, Dissolve me into ecstasies, And bring all Heav'n before mine eyes". John Milton - Il Penseroso (1632).   Merry Foxworth Open Door Realty Boston, MA 02131 617 469-4888 x207 877 865-1703 toll free http://www.opendoorrlty.com/ ----- Original Message ----- From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> To: "'PipeChat'" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Monday, January 17, 2005 8:04 PM Subject: [VERY LONG] The new year and Joyce Jones     A new year is here, and the first two weeks were a doozie. After spending a lot of the holiday in court, I came back to work to two full days of court for the first week of the new year. I have been faithfully practicing the organ in the evenings, although some days I don't feel I play the music for the recital program any better than when I started. But I cannot predict which days will be good - sometimes a stressful day leads to an unusually good practice. After one aggravating day all the music fell into place and sounded just like I wanted. That's always a magical feeling. I've calculated probable registrations, identified the obvious problem areas and repetitive practiced them, started on the program notes, and prepared materials for the recital committee to use for publicity. Try as I might, I cannot figure out how to avoid re-registering a couple times during the recital (which seems excessive to me), so am still working on that conundrum.   This week began with a call-back interview for a job in Tallahassee. That experience made me think long and hard about whether I really wanted that job if offered. In the meantime I had been discussing an offer from a friend to resume private practice, and checking into the cost of private health insurance while trying to figure out what to do with my deferred comp package.   The next day I took my mom in for cataract surgery, a pleasant experience. The entire procedure from admission and tests to pre-op to post-op took only about four hours. And her nationally-known eye specialist was so pleasant and personable, as well as being very knowledgeable and open. In fact, he personally called her the next day to check on her, asking whether she had any pain, about her blood sugar and medications, how her post-op appointment with her optometrist went, and so on.   So I spent the first half of the work week out of work. When I came back in, it was to find out that my boss was calling around trying to worm information from my co-workers about whether I was leaving. An attorney had been spreading rumors about me taking other jobs; in fact, a judge congratulated me on a new job as a prosecutor in front of the incumbent elected prosecutor, and I had to correct him and tell him I had not been offered such a position, embarrassing us both. I was at first angry that my boss didn't have the decency to check directly with me, but got over it quickly. After all, I would love the rumor to be true.   The week had been so busy, and just before a phone conference Friday I received a call offering me the Tallahassee job. I heard no voice from heaven, but suddenly knew with a blinding clarity that the answer was no. In fact, I have been so surprised that I'm not more disappointed, but can see the effects of the guiding hand.   Joyce Jones dedicated a Schantz organ rebuilt and added to by Schleuter at First Baptist Church in Enterprise, Alabama, on Sunday. So I took a very young and engaging although enthusiastically gay guy to hear her. I note this because I learned a lot from him during the trip. Before we left town, I stopped by my old church to leave some publicity info for the committee, and saw many of my old friends at the church, who welcomed me warmly and expressed excitement at the upcoming recital.   Anyway, back to this organ. Apparently the church's original organ (builder unidentified) from 1920 had been moved to the Episcopal church in town, and a Schantz was installed in 1970. Schleuter had been retained to do some work and add some sounds to the three-manual Schantz.   The church interior was pleasant, all creamy white walls with soft green carpet and pew cushions. The only pipes visible were the fa=E7ade across the front of the church, part of the principal looking as though dipped in a creamy taupy-gold enamel.   This was only Joyce's third recital in the state of Alabama, the other two having been in Birmingham and Mobile. We chose seats on the sixth row with a good view of her at the console, resplendent in a sparkling white iridescent gown of white chiffon.   The program:   Toccata on "Rejoice, Ye Pure in Heart" (tune Marion) - Albert Travis Prelude on "O Sacred Head Now Wounded" - J.S. Bach Prelude on "Nun freut euch . . . " - Bach Prelude and Fugue in D major, BWV 532 - Bach Pastorale - Cesar Franck Fete - Jean Langlais Variations on "America" - Charles Ives Two Hymn Preludes: on "O Waly Waly" and "Church in the Wildwood" Pageant - Leo Sowerby Encore: The Red Dragonfly   This was not her best recital, but she always provides such an engaging and entertaining program. She was at home, in a Baptist church with an attentive and appreciative audience. In fact, the church was full, the audience leaning forward and savoring every moment. However, she was suffering from allergies, which she admitted affected her playing. She played, as usual, totally from memory.   The Travis was new to me, but a joyous and interesting toccata by an organ professor at Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary. Does anyone else know this piece?   The two Bach chorales were played simply and lovingly, the "O Sacred Head" having been played at the Schantz original dedication. No tremulant was used. The "Rejoice, Beloved Christians" made use of a sweet (yes, that's what I said) schalmei and the zimbelstern.   The D major is a signature piece for her, and one of my friend's favorite pieces. Did you know it sounds different on a Baptist organ? After the recital she told us her eyes were watering so badly during the fugue that she almost fell off the organ bench.   The Pastorale is one of Franck's prettiest works, and it actually came off quite well on the organ. The Langlais showcased the new hooded en chamade hidden in the swell chamber. My friend was disappointed that the trumpet didn't part his hair, but it sported a pleasing sound. Ives' variations were a hoot, but the pedal portions near the end did not seem as prominent as usual. The organ seemed to suffer from a lot of 'attitude notes', as my friend called them, although there were some nice sounds. I did not get the opportunity to check how well the sound projected to the back of the room.   Joyce's two hymn preludes were a crowd-pleaser. I never studied the 'O Waly Waly' one, but realized that it needed three manuals because her right hand was playing two manuals at once. The Pageant was apparently a success too, judging from the audience's reaction. And the encore was received extremely well, a charming piece that explored the organ's less commonly used stops, including the chimes. I remember she once said she liked to use a harp on this number, but don't know what she substituted.   Afterward we were able to chat with Dr. Jones, and she was charming and diverting. We learned from her and church members that she had played some for the morning service, and that she was performing for the evening service. In fact, she was trying to finish the final preparations for the evening service, and a note was out. The builder had no representative present, and she apparently had to personally get a couple notes working Sunday morning. She was debating whether to crawl into the chamber in her white chiffon dress as we left her.   We stopped for coffee with the Dothan AGO Chapter dean and the young Auburn biochemical major who was persuading the university to provide him an organ minor. I forgot to ask with whom he was studying. Then we made the hour-long drive home.   When I arrived home, I discovered that I had been called (on a Sunday!) for another interview on a legislative job. So here I go again. It has been a while since I felt loved and needed at work, so having others interested in employing me is an alien but welcome warm and fuzzy feeling, almost as good as getting these organ pieces to fall into place. I realized that the sun had not been shining around here in a long time, and today is cold but clear and bright. The reserves of grace are beginning to refill.   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com           ****************************************************************** "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org>         in  
(back) Subject: Red Bank Palm Sunday Music (x post) From: <Innkawgneeto@cs.com> Date: Sun, 20 Mar 2005 20:56:51 EST   United Methodist Church of Red Bank, NJ, USA March 20, 2005, Palm Sunday   Hradetzky II/29   Prelude: "Partita on a Passion Chorale" (Piet Rippen). Hymn: "All Glory, Laud and Honor" (Theodulph). Wesley Singers (youth choir): "Sing to the Lord Hosanna" (Patrick = Liebergen). Offertory Anthem (Sanctuary Choir): "Ave Verum" (Mozart). Hymn after the offering: "We Sing our Loud Hosannas" (tune by John Horman [sp]). Closing Anthem: "When I Survey the Wondrous Cross" (arr. Gilbert Martin). Postlude: "Fantaisia in C" (J. S. Bach).   "When I Survey" followed a dramatic reading of today's Matthew text, in = which several of our church members participated (this replaced the sermon). = The reading was so beautifully done, and the anthem was a most logical = conclusion of that intense time of worship.   Spring has Sprung, albeit rather rainily.   Neil by the Bay      
(back) Subject: Re: both a Baptismal Pool and a Crucifix in the same church? From: "John Seboldt" <rohrwerk@seboldt.net> Date: Sun, 20 Mar 2005 20:37:43 -0600   > On 3/20/05 2:35 AM, "Jan Nijhuis" <nijhuis@email.com> wrote: > > >>The obvious answer is that the traditional baptism or christening in the = Roman >>Catholic churches is by sprinkling, not immersion   Highly debatable, and depends on what you mean by "traditional." You're right that perhaps most people in the RC church encounter the "minimal" version of a baptism, just a little sprinkling or pouring over the baby's head. But the more ancient tradition would be something more like immersion, or at least using a lot of water to get somebody really wet. And this is what is being revived in some places - because it uses the body and a created thing (water) in a fuller way.   In my last years at Church of the Annunciation, Minneapolis, we did a substantial pouring style one year at our Easter Vigil. The next year, one adult was baptized by being leaned back into the water three times - true immersion!   Two cathedrals of my acquaintance have used lots of water for baptisms at the Easter Vigil - the Basilica of Saint Mary, Minneapolis (co-cathedral), which used a temporary kind of "hot tub" setup up front - and here in Milwaukee, the last Vigil that retired Archbishop Rembert Weakland led utilized the renovated cathedral's new baptismal pool, with a substantial pouring over the candidates standing in the water. (Easter 2003)   To get this back on topic, I did get to visit Nichols and Simpson yesterday as they finish up the final voicing of the new "front" organ in St. John's Cathedral, Milwaukee - and it's quite fine! A more refined sound than the well-known Noehren organ in the gallery - but that's just the march of time and the appreciation of different styles since the late 60's. The spec is at:   http://www.nicholsandsimpson.com/cathedra.htm   Some preparations are made for some big reeds in a "Solo" division, which will not be present for some time - so you have a nice solid "full Swell", a fine 8' Great ensemble, and a basic pedal (the 32' Bourdon is actually live, contrary to the spec, albeit with a resultant lower octave). I only had a quick trial, and didn't compare it immediately with the gallery organ, but it sounds like it can already stand up to the gallery instrument as it is! So it's a bit more than "just" a choir organ for sure.   John Seboldt Milwaukee, WI www.seboldt.net  
(back) Subject: Re: PipeChat Digest #5220 - 03/20/05 From: <SWF12262@aol.com> Date: Sun, 20 Mar 2005 22:27:14 EST   This is totally off topic, I suppose, but questions about the Dawes piece =   might be directed to the Evanston Historical Society (Evanston, Illinois). = Their website is: _http://www.evanstonhistorical.org/_ (http://www.evanstonhistorical.org/) The Historical Society is located in the Charles Gates Dawes House, and I =   know they have some early sheet music of various pieces he wrote -- I volunteered as a docent there umpteen years ago when I was in high school. = The house is quite a place -- on the National Register of Historic Places, and = located right on Lake Michigan a little south of the Northwestern University = campus. They might have the original manuscripts in their files. Steve Steven Weyand Folkers Director of Music St. Lambert RC Church Skokie, IL (right next door to Evanston)   From: "Robert Ehrhardt" <r_ehrh@bellsouth.net> > To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> > Sent: Thursday, March 17, 2005 3:42 PM > Subject: Re: Popular Tune Sources > > > > One is the "Melody in A Major" by Brigadier General (and later Vice > > President of the United States) Charles A. Dawes which later became =   "It's > > All in the Game." > > > > > > Robert Ehrhardt > > Noel Memorial UMC > > Shreveport, LA USA > > http://www.zimbel.com/ehrhardt.html          
(back) Subject: Re: Red Bank Palm Sunday Music (x post) From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net> Date: Sun, 20 Mar 2005 21:27:24 -0600   We had a similar dramatic reading of the Passion this morning. The = Narrator this morning was a twelve-year-old girl, who was one of the = most fantastic readers I have ever heard. She has done quite a bit of = acting even though she is still very young, and knows how to project her = voice better than most adults. There was no mumbling into the = microphone. It just shows how it can be done.=20   We had a sermon as well, by the Bishop. But the service went really = well, including some very nice music, and nobody really noticed that it = lasted for over 1=BD hours.   John Speller, St. Mark's Episcopal Church, St. Louis, Mo. ----- Original Message -----=20 From: Innkawgneeto@cs.com=20 To: anglican-music@list.stsams.org ; pipechat@pipechat.org=20 Sent: Sunday, March 20, 2005 7:56 PM Subject: Red Bank Palm Sunday Music (x post)     United Methodist Church of Red Bank, NJ, USA March 20, 2005, Palm Sunday   Hradetzky II/29   Prelude: "Partita on a Passion Chorale" (Piet Rippen). Hymn: "All Glory, Laud and Honor" (Theodulph). Wesley Singers (youth choir): "Sing to the Lord Hosanna" (Patrick = Liebergen). Offertory Anthem (Sanctuary Choir): "Ave Verum" (Mozart). Hymn after the offering: "We Sing our Loud Hosannas" (tune by John = Horman [sp]). Closing Anthem: "When I Survey the Wondrous Cross" (arr. Gilbert = Martin). Postlude: "Fantaisia in C" (J. S. Bach).   "When I Survey" followed a dramatic reading of today's Matthew text, = in which several of our church members participated (this replaced the = sermon). The reading was so beautifully done, and the anthem was a most = logical conclusion of that intense time of worship.