PipeChat Digest #5235 - Sunday, March 27, 2005
 
Re: Enough Already
  by "Desiree'" <nicemusica@yahoo.com>
Easter Vigil at St. Lambert's
  by <SWF12262@aol.com>
Enough Already....Mea Culpa
  by <Wdh2@aol.com>
Mary Elizabeth Avinger, RIP
  by "littlebayus@yahoo.com" <littlebayus@yahoo.com>
RE: Acronym
  by "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
Re: Phoenix
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
Re: Decline in organ building??
  by "Bob Elms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au>
Re: Pens for staves
  by "Bob Elms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au>
Re: Pens for staves
  by "Bill Lyon" <wflyon@usadatanet.net>
Re: asbarss responds to dale to matt
  by <Keys4bach@aol.com>
now for something entirely different
  by <Keys4bach@aol.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Enough Already From: "Desiree'" <nicemusica@yahoo.com> Date: Sat, 26 Mar 2005 21:20:32 -0800 (PST)   (Amazing Grace, How Sweet the Sound...thats save a WRETCH...Like Me) Yall need to quit all this mess...rumor mongering, etc. Be nice! Heaven help what happens when the lists are informed about another = situation in the organ world. (my lips are SEALED)     Wdh2@aol.com wrote: One of the biggest problems in the organ society is the unwillingness of = hardheaded know-it-all childish individuals who are too ignorant to = understand that EVERYONE IS ENTITLED TO THEIR OWN OPINION. There are = members of this list who think Allen is the most realistic sound, others = think Rodgers is most pipelike and so on. Arguably, there have been = organists who thought Baldwin and Conn had nice sounds as well. 100 years = ago, someone liked the sound of Roosevelt, others thought Hook and = Hastings had a better product, while some chose Kimball, Hutchings, = Johnson or even Walcker. 55 yrs ago, it was a GDH Aeolian Skinner for = some, while others chose Austin, Wicks, Schlicker, Schantz, Reuter, = Moller, Casavant or the many smaller local builders. What I've just seen = over the past 3 days, however, is unconscionable. Matt, you've made = statements about the potential insolvency of a major manufacturer based on = evidence you have YET to produce. This kind of vicious and uninformed rumor-mongering should not be tolerated by the moderators of this list. = Once again, you are called upon to divulge the source of your information, = and failing that, to retract your "statement" and apologize to the list at = large. Just for the record Matt, here in the Washington, DC area, I've not = heard of ONE significant Johannus installation. Rodgers and Allen have = been the instrument of choice for YEARS and there is no reason to believe = that this will change significantly. Over the past 40 years that I've been = an organist, I've found things about Rodgers that I liked, and I've also = found things to like about Allen. As the sounds of the instruments have = changed over the years, I've found things to dislike about both companies. = The point that many seem to miss here is that churches, pastors, Trustee = boards, Organists or whomever the institution chooses to make the decision = to buy WHATEVER they buy, it is a complete waste of time and bandwidth to = second-guess and Monday-morning-quarterback a decision that NO ONE ASKED you to make in = the first place. I've read recent responses from 2 posters on this list = who have painted with a very broad brush, their opinions about why = churches choose electronics over pipes. As a teenager, I played for a = church which had a 1920s vintage pipeorgan by a local builder. At 8am, the = church sanctuary could have been as cold as 50F but by the 11am service, = the sanctuary might have reached 80F or above. Imagine that old organ = responding to a temperature shift as I've described. Add to the mix that = the church was having financial problems. Maintenance of the pipe organ = was a priority that came in well below the church's cash cow, the Nursery. = My last Easter at that church, I was almost relegated to the Hammond = because a power failure in the neighborhood had tripped the blower starter = relay and the church wouldn't pay a $25.00 service call to have the relay = reset. I left that post soon thereafter. There are many churches in the DC area with nice pipe organs which were once excellent = instruments and now are calliopes that I wouldn't want to hear at all = because the church has not had the money or the fortitude to have adequate = repair and attention as the instrument required. For such places, an = electronic is the last stop before organ music disappears completely. I, = too would MUCH rather have a nice pipe installation, but I have no = interest in having a pipe organ that the church will not maintain. I have = also had more than 5 Allen Organs in churches I've played for and 2 = Rodgers. None of them have been maintenance free, but they didn't incur = the expense of a monthly or even quarterly visit. Even now, as the price of oil climbs and those who fill the pews every = week find their wallets taxed by worldly expenses which can't be denied, = many congregations are seeing the weekly collection drop. The deficit will = be felt in all quarters and the music quarter is often first to be = pinched. The point has already been made that 80% of finance comes from = often 20% OR LESS of the congregants and I'm willing to wager that very = few have special endowments set aside for perpetual maintenance of the = pipe organ. Finally, enough of this childish and asinine rumor-mongering. Yes, I heard = the rumors of Austin's predicted demise as far back as 2002. Some = indicated Austin would not last into 2003. They were wrong. But the lies = that were spread had a very real effect on Austin's ability to inspire = confidence in their solvency and ability to deliver as contracted. Now we = have the results of those lies and the doors have indeed been shut. There = are those here who may be old enough to remember that Aeolian Skinner's = eulogy had been preached well in advance of it's demise as well. Perhaps = we can remember that this is a very litigious society that we live in. The = spreading of slanderous tabloid rumoring may find the spreader in court = explaining his postings.   --------------------------------- Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Small Business - Try our new resources site!
(back) Subject: Easter Vigil at St. Lambert's From: <SWF12262@aol.com> Date: Sun, 27 Mar 2005 00:40:32 EST   Here's the music for our Vigil: Service of Light: Traditional chants Exultet: Chanted by cantor Responsorial Psalm: Psalm 104 (Anglican Chant by Sir John Goss) Responsorial Psalm: Let Us Sing to the Lord (Owen Alstott) Responsorial Psalm: You Will Draw Water (by yours truly) Responsorial Psalm: Psalm 42 (Anglican Chant by William Crotch -- who we refer to as the composer with the unfortunate name) Gloria: A Community Mass (Richard Proulx) Gospel Acclamation: proper for the day (Owen Alstott -- 3 verses = modulating up a step at each repeat of the Alleluia refrain) Blessing of Font: Litany of Saints (chant) Sprinkling Rite: Vidi Aquam (chant) Offertory: Jesus Christ Is Risen Today (Easter Hymn, my arrangement) Mass Ordinary: A Community Mass (Richard Proulx) Communion Hymn: At The Lamb's High Feast (Salzburg, arr. by Robert J. = Powell) Anthem: Christ Our Passover Is Sacrificed For Us (Healey Willan) Anthem at the Retiring Procession: Hallelujah (Chorus from Messiah, GF Handel) Postlude: Toccata from Symphony V (Charles-Marie Widor) The Vigil lasted two hours, and we didn't even have any baptisms or confirmations this year! Lotsa music, but we get to recycle most of it = for the choir Masses tomorrow. Happy Easter! Steve Steven Weyand Folkers Director of Music St. Lambert RC Church Skokie, IL  
(back) Subject: Enough Already....Mea Culpa From: <Wdh2@aol.com> Date: Sun, 27 Mar 2005 00:46:12 EST   To the List; So very sorry......I forgot to sign my posting.   Warren D. Hood, II Washington DC  
(back) Subject: Mary Elizabeth Avinger, RIP From: "littlebayus@yahoo.com" <littlebayus@yahoo.com> Date: Sat, 26 Mar 2005 21:57:26 -0800 (PST)   At memorial services, we often hear the phrase, "We give thanks for the life of ...." On Easter Day we give thanks for the life of Jesus...   Although I'm about a month later thank I would have like to have been, I would like to write a tribute in honor of one of my teachers, Ms. Mary Elizabeth Avinger, a native of Orangeburg, S. C., who also was a part of the musical scene of Columbia, S. C. for a number of years. After all, in the words of colleague Monty Bennet, "We all need to remember our teachers, because if we didn't have them, where would we be..."   I found out about her December 22, 2003 passing when my December, 2004 Christmas card was returned to me in early February and marked, "deceased; please return."     (As I sent my 2003 Christmas card to her in late November, and as it was not returned to me, I like to think that she received it and read it before she passed on...)   I studied with Ms. Avinger in the Spring, 1970 semester at the University of South Carolina, after a hiatus of about ten years without lessons. In 1969, that university had installed a small, new Moller in the chapel, and in order to practice on that organ, I decided to take lessons.   She was such a patient teacher, who knew what music was suitable for me to get going, and what music I would enjoy studying... And she was also good at noting my mistakes, and telling me what fingering/pedalling to use...   That semester was the last of the 19 years she served as organist at Shandon Methodist Church. She told me that the commuting to Columbia (40 miles each way) had proved to be a bit too much, as she had to stay in Orangeburg to take care of her mother...who passed away, I think, in about 1975. I think she had commuted for about three years... It was such a shame that such a gracious woman had to give up her life for her mother. Her mother refused to move to Taipei, even though they had a house in Taipei.   Beginning in the Fall of 1970 she took a position at St. Andrew's Methodist church in Orangeburg, and, according to an obituary in The State newspaper of Columbia, S. C., played there up to 1993. After she stepped down as organist, she directed the handbell choir for a number of years.   I saw her once (I think in about 1971) on my way back from a trip to Charleston, S. C.... She was very happy to see me, and it was nice to have an evening snack and a chat with her...   Thanks to the wonders of e-mail, I was able to find her current snail mail address and renew contact with her via Christmas cards... After a year or so she mentioned that she had developed macular degeneration of the eyes... In both cases (as organist and handbell director) it was macular degeneration of her eyes which compelled her to stop... But I understood that she looked good up until a year before she passed on, and she was able to go to and enjoy concerts and other activities, e. g., the dedication of the Casavant organ at Trinity Episcopal Cathedral, Columbia, S. C.   From her aforementioned obituary in The State newspaper of Columbia, S. C. (and my own knowledge), I would like to add the following information about Ms. Avinger:   A native of Orangeburg, S. C., she graduated from Winthrop College in 1944 with a B. S. In addition, she did graduate work at Julliard School of Music in New York. She told me she taught a few years in a school, but decided not to continue in that vein.   She did, however, teach piano students in Columbia and Orangeburg for 42 years. She was an accompanist for the Columbia Choral Society (the director of which was the choir director at Shandon United Methodist Church, where she served as organist for 19 years --- 1951-1970), and assisted at rehearsals and concerts...   In addition, she taught organ at the University of South Carolina from the Fall of 1965 through the Spring of 1970.   For many years she served as accompanist for the Community Chorus, Singing Christmas Tree, Bicentennial Chorus, junior high choral clinics and the Unity Children's CHoir. Ms. Avinger was the scholarship chairman for the Accredited Music Teachers of Orangburg and a board member and treasurer of the Orangeburg Arts Festival.   In addition, although she never told me, I found out from the web site of the Columbia, S. C. chapter of the American Guild of Organists that this modest lady also served as the Dean from 1957 to 1959.   Yes, RIP, Ms. Avinger... I surely learned a lot from you during the one semester I had a chance to study with you. I'm just sorry you were not able to continue teaching at the university for a more extended period of time.       Morton Belcher       __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Small Business - Try our new resources site! http://smallbusiness.yahoo.com/resources/  
(back) Subject: RE: Acronym From: "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Sun, 27 Mar 2005 18:53:42 +1200       >"She Who Must Be Obeyed" has been around a long time, but it would be = fair to say that John Mortimer immortalized the phrase, at least most = recently,=A0 in his "Rumpole" books of 20 or 30 years ago.=20   The phrase was famously used H.Rider Haggard in his early 20thC novels, "She", "The Return of she" and "Ayehsa", good rollicking semi-science-fiction adventure yarns for teenagers. Long-winded, but = great books.   Ross    
(back) Subject: Re: Phoenix From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Sun, 27 Mar 2005 02:17:45 EST   In a message dated 3/26/2005 3:21:06 P.M. Pacific Standard Time, walterg@nauticom.net writes: http://www.streetsvilleunited.ca/Phoenix%20Organ.html Dear Walter:   I don't know what you mean by unshielded, they are showing the components inside the console with the back panel removed.   It all looks pretty darn good to me. Ian Tracy at Liverpool Cathedral Along with the big Willis, happily plays a Phoenix three manual in the Cathedral as well. They certainly are not your common backyard throw together jobs as you suggested. They needed music in another section of this rather large church and Phoenix got the nod, including recent rebuild w/ additions. These are not cheap off the shelf jobs, they are custom. The console looks like a pipe organ quality work too. See, this is how rumors get started. An unkind remark is made and it roller-coasters all over the world. Liverpool Cathedral can afford the very best. They don't do things on the cheap because they simply don't have too.   You may not have entirely meant everything you said, but it sure came across very negative.   Ron Severin    
(back) Subject: Re: Decline in organ building?? From: "Bob Elms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au> Date: Sun, 27 Mar 2005 16:25:34 +0800   Well I notice that Australia is buying redundant pipe organs from the UK. There are several in this state including one of unknown maker in an 18th = C. case, probably altered in about 1813 according to papers found inside the chests. There are others by Mack, Wragg and other English builders. The other states have made some notable imports of redundant British organs = also including Willis and, I believe, Harrison and Harrison. Your loss is our gain! Bob Elms.   ----- Original Message ----- From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Sunday, March 27, 2005 5:31 AM Subject: Re: Decline in organ building??     > Hello, > > In my area, circa 1950, there were probably in excess > of 100 pipe organs. > > There are now about twenty! > > Regards, > > Colin Mitchell UK > > > --- Bob Elms <bobelms@westnet.com.au> wrote: >> In 1950 in my area there were about 50 pipe organs; >> there are now about 110. >> That is decline???? >       -- No virus found in this outgoing message. Checked by AVG Anti-Virus. Version: 7.0.308 / Virus Database: 266.8.3 - Release Date: 25/03/2005    
(back) Subject: Re: Pens for staves From: "Bob Elms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au> Date: Sun, 27 Mar 2005 16:55:47 +0800   Me? I'm lazy. I draw them with the computer. 100 pages in a few minutes if = I want that many. Come to think of it I also write the key signatures, experssion and tempo marks and notation on the staves using the computer. Program cost me about $US50 and was worth every cent. And if I need to transpose as for a solo clarinet with piano accompaniment.... click! and = the solo line is transposed! I must be getting old. I am no longer have that sense of adventure in = making my own! Bob Elms. ----- Original Message ----- From: "Lelia Loban" <lelialoban@earthlink.net> To: <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Sunday, March 27, 2005 9:22 AM Subject: Re: Pens for staves     > > Speedball still makes a five-line "crow's quill" nib, made of brass, in > its > line of dipping pens with easily-replaceable (pull out, push on) nibs. > Speedballs are inexpensive compared to most other types of pens, by the > way. The basic technology hasn't changed in hundreds of years. I own a > Speedball five-line nib that I bought years ago, along with many other > Speedball nibs, for use in cartooning. Art supply stores still sell > Speedballs. They're great favorites with calligraphers and cartoonists. > >       -- No virus found in this outgoing message. Checked by AVG Anti-Virus. Version: 7.0.308 / Virus Database: 266.8.3 - Release Date: 25/03/2005    
(back) Subject: Re: Pens for staves From: "Bill Lyon" <wflyon@usadatanet.net> Date: Sun, 27 Mar 2005 04:06:33 -0500   What is the computer program you mention?   ----- Original Message ----- From: "Bob Elms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Sunday, March 27, 2005 3:55 AM Subject: Re: Pens for staves     > Me? I'm lazy. I draw them with the computer. 100 pages in a few minutes = if I > want that many. Come to think of it I also write the key signatures, > experssion and tempo marks and notation on the staves using the = computer. > Program cost me about $US50 and was worth every cent. And if I need to > transpose as for a solo clarinet with piano accompaniment.... click! and the > solo line is transposed! > I must be getting old. I am no longer have that sense of adventure in making > my own! > Bob Elms.    
(back) Subject: Re: asbarss responds to dale to matt From: <Keys4bach@aol.com> Date: Sun, 27 Mar 2005 04:35:11 EST   In a message dated 3/26/2005 10:52:11 P.M. Eastern Standard Time, asbarss@eastlink.ca writes:   Dale, you can spin that as a "forced update" if you wish but the bottom line is that the customer is able to have the instrument repaired and operating 100% rather than either replacing the entire organ or living with an ongoing problem that cannot be repaired.       Yes it was a Forced update and NOT CHEAP..... such is war. dale in  
(back) Subject: now for something entirely different From: <Keys4bach@aol.com> Date: Sun, 27 Mar 2005 04:51:58 EST   My pastor, the same one i was told NEVER works more than a month in = advance, just sent me a preaching schedule until November. We do not follow the lectionary. There is a 4 week series on the Lord's Prayer. i know we will sing the Malotte every week. Besides Flor Peeters, what other Lord's Prayers are out there for the = choir? We will be at 50 or so by then. Solos? dale in Easter Land