PipeChat Digest #5241 - Tuesday, March 29, 2005
 
Re: PipeChat Digest #5236 - 03/27/05
  by "Jim McFarland" <mcfarland6@juno.com>
Re: E-org financials
  by "Stephen Best" <stevebest@usadatanet.net>
Easter Service music
  by "Jonathan Orwig" <giwro@adelphia.net>
Re: Today's Music
  by <BlueeyedBear@aol.com>
Re: Digital Organ discussion
  by "Charles & Maria DeVita-Krug" <cdkrug@worldnet.att.net>
Fwd: newspaper article about Quimby and St. John the Divine organ restora
  by "Harry Martenas" <harry.martenas@gmail.com>
music for sunday after easter ???
  by "Daniel Hancock" <dhancock@brpae.com>
Unsympathetic Restorations
  by "Nathan Smith" <erzahler@sbcglobal.net>
RE: Unsympathetic Restorations
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: Pens for staves
  by "Jerry Richer" <jerry@ChirpingBat.Com>
Re: "Buggered"
  by "Merry Foxworth" <m.foxworth@verizon.net>
She Who Must Be Obeyed.
  by "Merry Foxworth" <m.foxworth@verizon.net>
Re: audtition literature
  by <Gfc234@aol.com>
This week's 1st mp3
  by "Jonathan Orwig" <giwro@adelphia.net>
Re: music for Sunday after Easter
  by <Justinhartz@aol.com>
RE: Unsympathetic Restorations
  by "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
 

(back) Subject: Re: PipeChat Digest #5236 - 03/27/05 From: "Jim McFarland" <mcfarland6@juno.com> Date: Mon, 28 Mar 2005 14:40:11 -0500       Dear Steve:   Thanks for your comments. Many of them were well taken.   If you read my original posting, I mentioned that getting too literal about my analogies was unwarranted. The analogies were there for a reason. The point is that each of these companies, when faced with insufficient operating capital, was able to come up with a solution to stay in business in order to work things out.   I stand by my statement that effective management can override a rumor mill. Each of the companies I mentioned had terrific rumor mills in full force, but they prevailed. Austin didn't exactly have the rumors printed in the WALL STREET JOURNAL. All of these other companies did!   I also said that, if the company was in good enough shape, they could have floated a loan because of the non-receipt of one receivable.   A more effective management would have moved positively some time back when the warning signs first appeared. I really don't know what Austin did to try to fix things. I am not trying to cast aspersions on Austin either.   Perhaps I am trying to say that a lot of organ businesses do not operate according to sound business principles. The powers that be at M=F6ller even admitted that they had no idea how much it cost them to build an organ, and that much of their pricing was "whatever the other guys are charging."   This is no economic era in which to try to operate a business by the seat of your pants.   As I said, if you have a good product, and a good market, you should not have to close up shop. If the market shifts a little, you must shift to meet it. It is a matter of good business management.   Were the market not there, it would be a different story.   Jim           On Mon, 28 Mar 2005 11:25:55 -0600 Steve Chandler <steve.chandler@open-tech.com> writes: > Jim McFarland wrote: > > >Did FORD go out of business when Pintos were exploding? Did > Chrysler go > >out of business when they teetered on bankruptcy with Iacocca at > the > >helm? Is K-Mart still here? The rumormongers were heavy at work, > long > >before any of the problems these companies experienced became > public > >knowledge. (PLEASE: no thread about organ-building not being > analogous. > >Good business practice is good business practice no matter what > the > >product or market.) > > > > > Hi Jim, > > As I recall Chrysler was bailed out by the US government. I suspect > we > won't be seeing a government bailout for Austin. Your point about > good > business management is important, but Chrysler provides a lot of > jobs > for US citizens and their demise would have become political fodder > as > well as possibly precipitating further economic disruption at a bad > > time. K-Mart is in bankruptcy reorganization as we speak, but they > are a > retailer. There's no expectation of ongoing service or support, so > rumors have limited impact because there's little downside. In fact > if > customers think the distress sale bargains will be better they'll go > there. > > I have no cirect knowledge of the situation but it would seem > Austin > failed for a variety of reasons, one of which was that rumors of > their > demise scared off potential customers because there is a history of > > organ builders going belly up in the middle of a project leaving > churches high and dry. That is why unsubstantiated rumors such as > the > iffy comment made purely on speculation are irresponsible. The fact > is > the German side of Daimler Chrysler supported the company for much > of > the last 5 years with the US side becoming the profitable entity in > just > the last few. Good management would have both sides making money. > tly that can be a challenge for even the best run companies. > > Steve Chandler > http://www.audiostreet.net/stevechandler > http://www.soundclick.com/stevechandler > >  
(back) Subject: Re: E-org financials From: "Stephen Best" <stevebest@usadatanet.net> Date: Mon, 28 Mar 2005 14:42:26 -0500   According to www.hoovers.com regarding Allen: "...more than half of the company's sales are generated by its data communications unit, Eastern Research, which makes access concentrators for network service providers and enterprise customers. Allen Integrated Assemblies performs contract manufacturing of electronic assemblies. Legacy Audio makes hi-fi and home theater speaker cabinets and sells amplifiers, while Allen Audio makes PA systems."   Steve Best in Utica, NY   Russ Greene wrote:   > Just curious, what do they do for the other 75% of their income? > > Russ Greene > > > On Mar 28, 2005, at 11:05 AM, Arie Vandenberg wrote: > >> From Allen's financials, they did roughly $21 Million in the organ >> business in 2004. They did roughly $20.5 million in 2003. In 2004 >> only 25% of their income was due to the organ business. > > > > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> > >      
(back) Subject: Easter Service music From: "Jonathan Orwig" <giwro@adelphia.net> Date: Mon, 28 Mar 2005 12:29:41 -0800   First Baptist Church of Riverside, California 9:00 and 10:45 a.m. (we "blend" our traditional and contemporary services several tiems a year - Easter is one of those)   Prelude - FBR Handbells Lord, I Want to be a Christian Beautiful Savior Good News Opening Hymns Christ the Lord is Ris'n Today (descant by yours truly) Crown Him With Many Crowns Offertory (choir) The Lamb Lives Again Singing our Praises (FBR Praise Team and Band) He Lives The Lord Almighty Reigns My Redeemer Lives Special Music (Men's Quartet) He Had to Rise Hymn I Serve a Risen Savior Closing Hymn Low in the Grave He Lay Postlude Improv on Christ the lord is Ris'n Today/Christ is erstanden __________   Over 700 in the 2 services... and BOY did they SING Sr. Pastor preached wonderfully, music was a BLAST - now this organist/worship leader/program director/jack-of-all-trades is TIRED   -- Jonathan Orwig Evensong Music, Media and Graphics New Organ Music http://www.evensongmusic.net    
(back) Subject: Re: Today's Music From: <BlueeyedBear@aol.com> Date: Mon, 28 Mar 2005 15:30:08 EST   In a message dated 3/28/05 8:47:34 AM Pacific Standard Time, rcolev@woh.rr.com writes:   > Isn't that called "Asperges" from Psalm 51:7 Purge me with hyssop, and I =   > shall be clean: wash me, and I shall be whiter than snow. Or in the = Vulgate > (as I remember it): asparges me hysopo et mundabor lavabis me et super > nivem dealbabor > > Cole Votaw -- Springfield, Ohio, USA   i don't know. it was new to me. remember, i was raised in a southern baptist family. we'd never even heard the words advent, lent, or epiphany = until i was in my 20s, and then when i was playing for a different denomination. = and latin was shunned of course (that's too catholic!).   let's just say i'm no longer associated with that denomination.   scot  
(back) Subject: Re: Digital Organ discussion From: "Charles & Maria DeVita-Krug" <cdkrug@worldnet.att.net> Date: Mon, 28 Mar 2005 17:43:21 -0500   On Mon, Mar 28, 2005 at 10:23:51AM -0500, Tom Hoehn wrote: > but what kind of organ did they buy? I've never played a toaster.. >   Allen something or other.    
(back) Subject: Fwd: newspaper article about Quimby and St. John the Divine organ restoration From: "Harry Martenas" <harry.martenas@gmail.com> Date: Mon, 28 Mar 2005 18:08:58 -0500   (sorry if this appeared twice - issues with gmail)   Very nice article about The Quimby firm, and their work on the the restoration of the AS from the Cathedral of St. John the Divine NYC:   http://www.kansascity.com/mld/kansascity/entertainment/11221850.htm   Registration required (or use www.bugmenot.com).   Harry Martenas  
(back) Subject: music for sunday after easter ??? From: "Daniel Hancock" <dhancock@brpae.com> Date: Mon, 28 Mar 2005 17:50:07 -0600   Subject: music for sunday after easter ??? From: <BlueeyedBear@aol.com> Date: Sun, 27 Mar 2005 16:57:12 EST   what's everyone playing for prelude & postlude NEXT sunday?       Tuba Tune in D-Major, C.S. Lang, for the Postlude...  
(back) Subject: Unsympathetic Restorations From: "Nathan Smith" <erzahler@sbcglobal.net> Date: Mon, 28 Mar 2005 19:50:13 -0500   >>Even though it is very sensible to be extremely careful what is done to an old organ, as to an old building, there should never be an a priori assumption either that an organ must not be altered or added to; and there should also never be the a priori assumption that's it's OK to do exactly as each skittish new organist damn well pleases. There may, also, be cases where 100% "no change" should be the policy, but I'd like to see, as a broad principle, each case to be taken on its merits. As changing musical demands on instruments are made, so too must instruments sometimes change to meet those musical demands.   It is my life's work to preserve organs and return them to their original specification when possible. The people that built our great organs were extremely musical people - most of them apprenticed and were absolutely familiar with how to make a musical instrument. I would no more change a fine example of organ-building than to place a Chevy 350 V8 in a Rolls Royce, electrify Big Ben, put a Pentium III in an ENIAC, paint a classic Federal style house electric pink, etc...   Why is it that no one would ever think of modifying these other historic treasures, but in the same time give no thought to the prospect of chucking out pipework from say, Blenheim Palace?   The instruments out there that have not been touched represent something of extreme value to future generations - an entire representation of the art and intent of any particular builder. To me, the integrity of these instruments make them all the more enjoyable. Certainly, some of the famous organs cited prior to the excerpt quoted above are most loveable and most enjoyable to be sure, but they are not original, and their historic value is lessened as a result.   The fact that modifications have been made to organs a hundred years ago is water under the bridge. The fact that original organs are still going under the knife for want of seeing one's own vision over that of the original builder is a whole different ball of wax, and is very much under our control.   I question the winds of "changing musical demands", particularly as it applies to Church organs. Somehow I don't see it possible that some time in the 50's or 60's, Church members suddenly stood up in protest and said "Gee, our organ really isn't screechy and gutless enough, I couldn't possibly bear musical worship here without fixing our organ's decadence". Somehow I doubt that Symphonic organs suddenly made ugly and repulsive music that was so terrible that they had to be immediately put out of their misery. I wonder if the Lord was less pleased with Churches that didn't modify their organs, and thrilled by the worship of those that did? I wonder if hymn singing was more like dirge singing when the congregation was forced to sing over a 1920's funhouse Austin, compared to the joyful singing forth of earth-lifting praises in song of another congregation having their ears bleed to a nice 7 rank squeaky mixture? I wonder of people kill themselves when they hear an original Skinner because it hasn't been "fixed". "Changing musical demands" is a creative way of getting something one wants on an organ that is not theirs.   If musical demands are changing so much, why still mess with Bach? Heck, why still mess around with McK Williams, Widor, Alain, Buxtehude, Dupre, or anyone else for that matter? Why try to render of these performances in an historically accurate manner? Why is playing Bach with Celestes and octave couplers anathema for want of historic practice, but hacking a Kimball to death is no big deal?   The last time I checked, cars still have four wheels. Likewise, organs still have Diapasons, Flutes, Strings, Reeds, and Diaphones (to be inclusive). Granted they come in all shapes and sizes, but they all seem to translate to and from one another pretty well. Organists tend to have a natural ability to adapt to any situation that is thrown at them as well. So tell me what is so dang pressing that we need to hack these organs only to retire, die, and leave the mess for someone else to clean up?   By the way, are there any G-compass organs in existence anymore?   I would be curious to know if the author of the quote at the beginning of this response would be in favor of adding string or flute celestes to some of the organs in his area, as current musical demands would advocate the use of them.   Kind Regards,   Nathan   P.S. I am writing this on my brand new Mac IBook, which is an absolutely incredible little piece of equipment.    
(back) Subject: RE: Unsympathetic Restorations From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Mon, 28 Mar 2005 17:30:44 -0800 (PST)   Hello,   So far as I am aware, the Tower Ballroom organ at Blackpool, by Wurlitzer, is still a 13 rank instrument, but I may be wrong.   What was added in the days of the infamous Reginald Dixon, were those dreadful Tierce Couplers, which make everything without the tremulants sound out of tune.   Not too sure about the addition of a large new Flentrop Mixture at Alkmaar, but I have a very large book about it, and I will check this out.   Regards, Colin Mitchell UK         --- TheShieling <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> wrote:   > Didn't Flentrop add a large Mixture to the Alkmaar > organ? > > Hasn't the 18thC pedal been retained at St Valery in > Sion, Switzerland? > > Hasn't Marmoutier retained its Pedal 16fts? > > Hasn't the Tower Ballroom at Blackpool WurliTzer > been added to? > (Yes, there is no reason to exclude theatre organs > from this discussion).       __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Small Business - Try our new resources site! http://smallbusiness.yahoo.com/resources/  
(back) Subject: Re: Pens for staves From: "Jerry Richer" <jerry@ChirpingBat.Com> Date: Mon, 28 Mar 2005 15:31:59 -0500   I remember the nuns in Catholic school had a thing that held five = sticks of chalk. When it came time for music they just had to take one = swipe down the length of the chalk board. Chirp|Chirp|Chirp: It's the Bat, Chirping Bat .Com
(back) Subject: Re: "Buggered" From: "Merry Foxworth" <m.foxworth@verizon.net> Date: Mon, 28 Mar 2005 22:18:40 -0500   "Bugger" is considered a swear word in the UK, as is "bloody". Merry     =B4=A8=A8)) -:=A6:- =B8.=B7=B4 .=B7=B4=A8=A8)) ((=B8=B8.=B7=B4 ..=B7=B4 -:=A6:-   An excerpt from Robert Giddings "Musical Quotes and Anecdotes", published in Longman Pocket Companions: "There let the pealing organ blow, To the full-voiced choir below, In service high, and anthems clear, As may with sweetness, through mine ear, Dissolve me into ecstasies, And bring all Heav'n before mine eyes". John Milton - Il Penseroso (1632).   Merry Foxworth Open Door Realty Boston, MA 02131 617 469-4888 x207 877 865-1703 toll free http://www.opendoorrlty.com/ ----- Original Message ----- From: "Harry Grove" <musicman@cottagemusic.co.uk> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Monday, March 28, 2005 10:13 AM Subject: Re: "Buggered"     > ----- Original Message ----- > From: "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca> > To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> > Sent: Monday, March 28, 2005 12:12 AM > Subject: Re: "Buggered" > > > > "Buggered Up" is a colloquialism which properly translated into America= n > > would mean "Screwed Up" > > In other words .... 'screwed' .... but by Gentlemen > > H > [a.k.a. a musicman happy to help our trans-Atlantic cousins get to grips > with English "as she is spoke"] > > > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> > >     >  
(back) Subject: She Who Must Be Obeyed. From: "Merry Foxworth" <m.foxworth@verizon.net> Date: Mon, 28 Mar 2005 22:25:40 -0500   aahhh.....shades of Rumpole of the Bailey!!!!!     =B4=A8=A8)) -:=A6:- =B8.=B7=B4 .=B7=B4=A8=A8)) ((=B8=B8.=B7=B4 ..=B7=B4 -:=A6:-   An excerpt from Robert Giddings "Musical Quotes and Anecdotes", published in Longman Pocket Companions: "There let the pealing organ blow, To the full-voiced choir below, In service high, and anthems clear, As may with sweetness, through mine ear, Dissolve me into ecstasies, And bring all Heav'n before mine eyes". John Milton - Il Penseroso (1632).   Merry Foxworth Open Door Realty Boston, MA 02131 617 469-4888 x207 877 865-1703 toll free http://www.opendoorrlty.com/ ----- Original Message ----- From: "Charles & Maria DeVita-Krug" <cdkrug@worldnet.att.net> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Sunday, March 27, 2005 10:33 PM Subject: Re: Digital Organ discussion     > On Sat, Mar 26, 2005 at 04:43:08PM -0500, N. Russotto wrote: > > SWMBO? Usually I'm pretty good w/ these, but what is this?!? > > > > She Who Must Be Obeyed. > > > > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> > >     To  
(back) Subject: Re: audtition literature From: <Gfc234@aol.com> Date: Mon, 28 Mar 2005 23:08:18 EST     In a message dated 3/28/05 9:11:02 AM, nicemusica@yahoo.com writes:     >=20 > they take you as an Organ major with a chart-of-progression. That=20 > Chart-of_progression shows what level you shoul dbe at by graduation. >=20 > =A0 >=20 >=20   Hmm...That is very interesting. Who are those teachers?       Gregory Ceurvorst 1921 Sherman Ave. #GS Evanston, IL 60201 847.332.2788 home/fax 708.243.2549 mobile gfc234@aol.com gfc234@nextel.blackberry.net  
(back) Subject: This week's 1st mp3 From: "Jonathan Orwig" <giwro@adelphia.net> Date: Mon, 28 Mar 2005 20:45:56 -0800   Hello again, organophiles   This week's first mp3 is Johann Nepomuk David's little Partita on Vom Himmel Hoch. This is definitely 20th century music, but I found this piece fascinating - the theme is always SOMEwhere... sometimes at several different speeds in canon, sometimes altered... always recognizable if you listen closely   Johann Nepomuk David was a 20th Century German composer who wrote a large number of organ works. His style is often severe and can be dissonant, as he is more concerned with counterpoint and linear writing than harmony. <>This piece is from his monumental 21 volume collection of chorale arrangements. Vol. 7 has 3 different little partitas, all subtitled "f=FCr Orgel-positiv", and so I have chosen to do this recording =   on a small 5-stop Ott organ in order to honor the spirit of the composer's wishes. The other pieces are Es Kommt ein Schiff and Wie sch=F6n leuchtet der Morgenstern.   In addition to the many chorale arrangements, David also wrote a collection of 12 Fugues, each in a different key of the scale, and several other free-composed organ works. Furthermore, he has written much music for other instruments - choral, chamber orchestral, etc.   ftp://diapason.dk/toccata/David,%20Johann%20Nepomuk/JNDavidChoralwerkVol7no= 35VomHimmelHoch.mp3   For those of you who have concerns about copyright issues where it pertains to non-Public Domain music, I need to tell you that this site where the file is located is a LEGAL repository of private recordings of organ music. The site's owner pays royalties based on the number of downloads, so the copyright owners are getting their fair share. Further information about this procedure can be obtained here:   http://toccata-duo.typepad.com/toccata/2005/02/index.html   -- Jonathan Orwig Evensong Music, Media and Graphics New Organ Music http://www.evensongmusic.net    
(back) Subject: Re: music for Sunday after Easter From: <Justinhartz@aol.com> Date: Tue, 29 Mar 2005 00:27:40 EST   I'm playing "O filii et filiae" by Dandrieu. The Hymn "Alleluia! O sons = and daughters let us sing" is based on this tune. This Sunday is also known as "Thomas" Sunday. "O filii et filiae" makes reference to the "Doubting Thomas" theme of the Gospel.   Justin Hartz  
(back) Subject: RE: Unsympathetic Restorations From: "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Tue, 29 Mar 2005 17:49:25 +1200     >So far as I am aware, the Tower Ballroom organ at Blackpool, by Wurlitzer, is still a 13 rank instrument, but I may be wrong.   Precisely my point, Colin. It was NOT thirteen ranks to begin with.   >Not too sure about the addition of a large new Flentrop Mixture at Alkmaar, but I have a very large book about it, and I will check this out.   It was Flentrop who added a large Mixture to the Pedal. I'm certain of = this, and that he also suppressed the 21 1/3 Pedal Quint. Both actions sensible, in my view.   Ross