PipeChat Digest #5244 - Wednesday, March 30, 2005
 
Re: Unsympathetic Restorations
  by "F. Richard Burt" <effarbee@verizon.net>
Re: music for sunday after easter ???
  by <BlueeyedBear@aol.com>
Re: You Have Come Down to the Lakeshore
  by "Mark Nelson" <mark.edward.nelson@gmail.com>
Re: music for sunday after easter ???
  by "Mark Nelson" <mark.edward.nelson@gmail.com>
Re: You Have Come Down to the Lakeshore
  by "Shirley" <pnst.shirley@verizon.net>
Technicolour dreamcoats
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
RE: Technicolour dreamcoats
  by "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
Re: E-org financials
  by "Russ Greene" <rggreene2@shaw.ca>
Audition requirements at the schools I got "yes" from
  by "Desiree'" <nicemusica@yahoo.com>
Re: music for sunday after easter ???
  by "Karl Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu>
Unsympathetic Restorations
  by "Nathan Smith" <erzahler@sbcglobal.net>
this week's SECOND mp3
  by "Jonathan Orwig" <giwro@adelphia.net>
And now for something completely different...
  by <Justinhartz@aol.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Unsympathetic Restorations From: "F. Richard Burt" <effarbee@verizon.net> Date: Tue, 29 Mar 2005 12:08:16 -0600   Hello, Collin: A long, long time ago, when I started selling organs in the American Southwest, we often chuckled up our sleeves about those who so beautifully crafted carvings and inlays to make the organs very attractive to behold. From some who advocated that wood carvings and inlays, sturdy consoles, heavy as elephants, and knobs that move flawlessly, . . . don't make any noise, that is musical noises. They cost a lot, and do not make the organ sound pretty, harmonious, cohesive, or any other adjective you might invoke. Pipe organs in the 1960s were as proportionately more expensive, as they are today, than any other alternatives; such as the better efforts of electronic organ builders, who were as derided then as the digital E-org builders are today. Perhaps, in a flyback attempt to equalize the imbalances, the pipe builders became known as "wood butchers."   Collin wrote:   > There are people who work with wood. > * * * > > Now just because an organ-builder manages to make > an organ which doesn't fall down, and which manages > to sound a few notes in something resembling harmony, > doesn't mean that what they create is necessarily > musically worthy or has integrity. Unfortunately, many look at the finished construction of wood facade, the architectural line, balance, and artistic rendering and equate this with "the art of organ building." E. Power Biggs said on one of his pipe organ recordings something to this effect, and we heard the fervancy of his endorsement with great emotion. Many who followed in his footsteps espoused similar comments, whether convincingly or not. I do not wish to despise those who made the appearance of the organs look so good. They deserve credit where credit is due. Thank you. However, in my view "The Sound Is Everything." I hold this as the motto for my own work. As an E-org builder and installer, we can lose our shirts by trying to make the organ installation "look good." What may be a relatively small percentage of "eye candy" for a new pipe organ can overwhelm the budget of a fine E-org installation. We do not have the pipes with which to create good looking facades, etc. Some people cry against us when we make a pretty pipe facade of pipes that will never be used again in a wind-blown instrument (for whatever reasons), and they bitterly degrade the facade's appearnace by claiming the faux pipe facade is a lie in public display, in that we use digital sounds made by means other than blowing wind through the pipes. I commend you, Collin, for your observations about the expense of wood craftsmanship in presenting the pipe organ. Pretty? Yes. Contribute to the quality of organ sound? No. AND, I am not pushing for a return to chambers with grill cloth coverings. Let's rethink the reasons we should continue to build pipe organs and remember that it is the sound of the pipes that makes the organs worthwhile. F. Richard Burt Dorian Organs ..    
(back) Subject: Re: music for sunday after easter ??? From: <BlueeyedBear@aol.com> Date: Tue, 29 Mar 2005 15:41:15 EST   In a message dated 3/29/05 10:07:47 AM Pacific Standard Time, PEMMONS@wcupa.edu writes:   > In my book, there's one and only ONE best piece for the First Sunday > after Easter: > > The suite for Quasimodo by Charles Tournemire. > > It's one of his finest and deservedly best-known low masses in L'Orgue > Mystique; and it would not be appropriate to play it on any other day in > the year. It's First Sunday after Easter, do or die. I find it > irresistible almost every year. > > (Quasimodo is the first word of the introit for this Sunday. Many > Sundays in the liturgical year are, or used to be, known by the first > word of the introit. It is no reference to the hunchback bellringer > 'Quasimodo' in Victor Hugo's novel _Notre-Dame de Paris_. Rather, he > got his name because as an infant he had been found abandoned on this > day.)   yes, i know and have played tournemire's quasimodo suite in church many times. however, i'm looking for something different this year. when i = posted to the list under the subject "quasimodo sunday" i did not get any serious responses.   scot  
(back) Subject: Re: You Have Come Down to the Lakeshore From: "Mark Nelson" <mark.edward.nelson@gmail.com> Date: Tue, 29 Mar 2005 15:43:07 -0500   There are short commentaries in the Leaders edition to WLP (ECUSA's Wonder Love and Praise--but it's not very helpful--no background info--just performance & use suggestions) as well as WOV Reference Companion (ELCA's With One Voice) which I don't have a copy of here.   Mark Nelson     On Tue, 29 Mar 2005 08:19:52 -0500, Randolph Runyon <runyonr@muohio.edu> = wrote: > The New Century Hymnal appends the following note to this hymn: "One > of the most popular hymns to emerge from the 1970s revival of religious > songs in Spain, this text has been translated into nearly eighty > languages. The Spanish composer-author was a parish priest known for > his work among youth." > > Randy Runyon > > > On Mar 29, 2005, at 8:03 AM, Emily Adams wrote: > > > Hi Chatters, > > > > I'd like to write a brief paragraph for my Sunday bulletin about this > > Spanish hymn composed by Cesareo Gabarain--but I can't locate anything > > much about either the hymn or the composer by searching online. Can > > anyone point me to a source? Thanks. > > > > Emily A. > > > > ****************************************************************** > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> > > > > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> > >  
(back) Subject: Re: music for sunday after easter ??? From: "Mark Nelson" <mark.edward.nelson@gmail.com> Date: Tue, 29 Mar 2005 15:44:33 -0500   I'm playing Dandrieu's O filii et filiae from Biggsie's edition. Does anyone have the original registrations that they could share with me?   Mark Nelson St. John's Gloucester  
(back) Subject: Re: You Have Come Down to the Lakeshore From: "Shirley" <pnst.shirley@verizon.net> Date: Tue, 29 Mar 2005 09:51:48 -0500   Oh well, it's a short paragraph. Here it is:   Perhaps Cesaro Gabarai's most famous hymn, "Pescador de hombres" has been translated to more than eighty languages. The first publication seems to = have been a small booklet, Dios con nosotros (Madrid, c. 1973-1979).   Madeleine Forell Marshall, who translated the hymn, notes that she and her =   husband grew very fond of this Spanish hymn while he was a mission = developer in Puerto Rico for the Lutheran Church in America. The translation was first = sung in chapel at St. Olaf College in 1988 or 1989, where "the reaction was that = it was 'so romantic'".   --from "With One Voice Reference Companion", Marilyn Kay Stulken. = Augsburg- Fortress, Pub., 2000.       On 29 Mar 2005 at 8:03, Emily Adams expounded:   > Hi Chatters, > > I'd like to write a brief paragraph for my Sunday bulletin about this > Spanish hymn composed by Cesareo Gabarain--but I can't locate anything > much about either the hymn or the composer by searching online. Can > anyone point me to a source? Thanks.      
(back) Subject: Technicolour dreamcoats From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Tue, 29 Mar 2005 13:30:08 -0800 (PST)   Hello,   An interesting response from Richard, with which I partly agree.   After all, some of the ugliest organs produce the most amazing sounds....Willis, Lewis, perhaps even the functional display of the Walker at Blackburn Cathedral....rows of pipes and white wooden boxes and little else.   Visual art is not musical art, but visual art IS very desirable.   One of the constant joys of Holland is to observe the visual beauty of a silent organ. Fabulous wood-carving, beautiful gilt, elegant proportion and....just sometimes....a winged case adorned by the work of an old master painter.   Visual beauty is terribly important, but it should always take second place to the SOUND of an instrument.   Lest we forget, the celebrated Bavo organ at Haarlem has a Yew case which cost as much as the musical instrument it embraces!! No wonder that it is a national treasure.   THAT requires fabulous wealth!   What would it cost to-day?   $12,000,000 or more?   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK     --- "F. Richard Burt" <effarbee@verizon.net> wrote: > Hello, Collin: > > A long, long time ago, when I started selling organs > in > the American Southwest, we often chuckled up our > sleeves about those who so beautifully crafted > carvings > and inlays to make the organs very attractive to > behold.       __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Small Business - Try our new resources site! http://smallbusiness.yahoo.com/resources/  
(back) Subject: RE: Technicolour dreamcoats From: "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Wed, 30 Mar 2005 09:57:55 +1200       >Visual art is not musical art, but visual art IS very desirable. >Visual beauty is terribly important, but it should always take second place to the SOUND of an instrument.   >>we often chuckled up our sleeves about those who so beautifully crafted >> carvings and inlays to make the organs very attractive to >> behold.   That makes me think of 19thC American reed organs: they could be fantastically decorative and fun pieces of furniture, but they disguised a lamentable sound that is today nothing more than a sentimental wail. = Against that, the genuine French harmoniums of people like Christophe, Alexandre = and Mustel were in comparison extraordinarily plain to look at, but they produced a wonderful sound and often still do so a century later.   Certainly, the sound is always the thing to aim for. It amuses me, therefore, when non-organists look at a fancy case attached to a 3rk unit organ with 30 tabs and a whole raft of pistons and say, "What a huge and beautiful organ". I've seen, even in this country, this sort of thing, and also seen some ugly instruments that sound gorgeous and are very effective for their use.   'Twas ever thus. We have here in NZ a 1m 1691 organ by Renatus Harris, brought to NZ about 85 years ago. All the case pipes are dummies and the Open Diapason is only open to TenC. I can't help feeling the money spent = on the dummies would have been better spent taking the OpDiap down a few further notes. I can think of the Christchurch Cathedral organ, too: it = was a 3m tracker Hill in the 1880s, and very greatly enlarged by HN&B in the 1920s. Then, in the 1960s it was given a great oak case, but the sound of the instrument suffered enormously and helped to occasion a very big = rebuild and enlargement about 25 years later. Some of the offending and = obliterating wood of the case was replaced by acoustically-transparent grilles at that time, but the damage was done, permanently. The 32ft Open Wood, for = example, used to stand on the floor of the transept, totally unobstructed, and was phenomenally effective. When the case went up, hiding these pipes, just about a foot in front of the pipe mouths, the 32ft octave virtually disappeared and has never been the same since. Grunt, snarl, cusses!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!   I've mentioned before on this List the fine work done by Nicholsons at Gloucester Cathedral and Malvern Priory in England. In both cases the outward appearance has remained unchanged, but internal re-arrangement to give the best possible sound egress has been carried out with great = success.     For some of you, there seems to be a choice. Many of you have organs to play. Think, just now and again, on this poor fellow here in NZ whose = parish church has a 13-year-old 2m electroid.........   Ross    
(back) Subject: Re: E-org financials From: "Russ Greene" <rggreene2@shaw.ca> Date: Tue, 29 Mar 2005 16:52:28 -0600   Thanks Arie (and several others), I had never investigated Allen's financials so was completely unaware of their diversity.   Russ Greene     On Mar 28, 2005, at 1:38 PM, Arie Vandenberg wrote:   > Does this satisfy your curiosity?    
(back) Subject: Audition requirements at the schools I got "yes" from From: "Desiree'" <nicemusica@yahoo.com> Date: Tue, 29 Mar 2005 16:38:13 -0800 (PST)   These are the requirements at the three schools I have applied to and that = have accepted me. The teachers did however say for me to go a little further as a transfer, = as to play 20-30 minutes of minutes, and include atleast 2 lyrical pieces, = and 2 to 3 hymns, one with an improvised interlude, stop changes, and = modulation/final verse. (That reminded me of the audition requirements for = Indiana University) All three accepted my as a Performance major, and have said to start = thinking about Jr Recital Repertoire, which should include a Mendelsohn = Sonata. The audition requirements listed first are at the school I feel = strongest about , close to NYC. My music scores also placed me at taking = composition lessons on the upper 200 level. ------------------------- Organ   It is preferable that auditions take place in person. Please contact the = Department to schedule your audition as well as pre-audition practice = time. Questions pertaining to organ study may be addressed to the organ = faculty. Memorization is optional.   Music Education, Music Therapy, Theory/Composition concentrations: - A major work (prelude and fugue or equivalent) by J.S. Bach or one of = his contemporaries. - A work from the Romantic literature OR a work from the 20th century - Sight-reading   Performance concentration: - A major work (prelude and fugue or equivalent) by J.S. Bach or one of = his contemporaries. - A work from the Romantic literature* - A work from the 20th century* - Sight-reading   *either the Romantic or 20th-century work should be of large scale ----------------------------------------   The other school of interest, number 2 in line, located downtown in a = major Southeast city, asked for me to so the same as the above: send in a = CD with 20-30 minutes of playing, inclusive of an Bach Prelude/Fugue that = would be done within the first 2 years of undergrad study, and a Romantic = or 20th century piece, with it preferably being one to show dexterity (ie = Litanies)   ORGAN =95 All major and minor scales (natural, melodic and harmonic forms), 4 = octaves, in 16ths; metronome speed of quarter note =3D 112.   =95 All major and minor arpeggios, 4 octaves, in 16ths; metronome speed = of quarter note =3D 40.   =95 One chorale prelude from the Orgelbuchlein, BWV 599-644, by J.S. = Bach. One of the Eight Little Preludes and Fugues, BWV 553-560, by J.S. = Bach.   =95 One chorale prelude by Johannes Brahms, Flor Peeters, or Helmut = Walcha.   The third school stated the same as the above places.   There are two others that I sent packages too just for kicks and giggles. = Dunno what they will say.     TDH   --------------------------------- Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Small Business - Try our new resources site!
(back) Subject: Re: music for sunday after easter ??? From: "Karl Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu> Date: Tue, 29 Mar 2005 20:33:16 -0500   For the Sunday after Easter, i.e., the Second Sunday of Easter, is there = any more exciting organ piece than the Lynwood Farnam toccata on "O Filii et Filiae?" Too bad it's over in about 2 minutes, but it's great while it lasts. I would often play it at the end of Offertory music, which came = soon after we'd sung the hymn itself (which came after the sermon).   Karl E. Moyer Lancaster PA    
(back) Subject: Unsympathetic Restorations From: "Nathan Smith" <erzahler@sbcglobal.net> Date: Tue, 29 Mar 2005 22:25:41 -0500   >>So what would you do with the Newberry Memorial Organ at Yale   I think that I had addressed that sort of issue when I said that I would no more think of removing the beautiful Binns action from Armley than return St. John the Divine to it's pre-Harrison days. The fact of the matter is that the Woolsey organ is a far cry away from the trivial sort of buggery that takes place on instruments these days, for far less noble reasons. I don't find many similarities between Mr. Skinner's enlargement of the Woolsey organ, performed in the spirit of the two organs that came before, having already encountered a heavily modified organ, and say, taking an original early hook and cutting down Dulcianas into Tierces. No doubt the thinking that set the first rebuild the Newberry received into motion not fifteen years later was inspired in no small part by the somewhat tender side-valve Hutchings chests. This situation was no doubt exaggerated by the heavy use of the organ, which continues to this very day. However, the Newberry is an exceptional organ, and is the same organ that it was nearly eighty years ago in 1928, mechanically, tonally, and visually. It's also has Mr. Skinner's stamp on it, which makes it the only large University Skinner left intact.   Granted, I daydream about what the Hutchings was like in its day. But the Newberry is such a wonderful organ, and physically (though not in spirit) different from the Hutchings, it would be foolish to even try to change the organ back to its older state. Such a suggestion is not only such an extreme false dilemma that the answer should be obvious, but the situation regarding the past and present of the Newberry is so out of touch with the scope of what happens to original and valuable organs to this day, that I am perplexed by your asking it.   >>And i don't see that Ernest Skinner had any problems with taking the previous work and turning it into one of his own organs.   Moller didn't have any problem with wrecking their own organs either, never mind anyone else's - are we going to cite this as an excuse to kill off more original organs?   >>I guess if it was OK for EM Skinner to do this then it should be OK for us to do the same today.   That is a thoroughly dangerous and insensitive argument. By that standard, I suppose the next step would be to get to work improving St. Suplice.   >>And what would you do with a 1951 Aeolian-Skinner with a 4 manual >>console that had almost 1/2 of the stops on the console prepared for?   I'd add the prepared for stops of course! I'm sure the old Aeolian-Skinner specifications have listed all of the pipe scales, cut-ups, toe-holes, etc.. If the organ has a prepared for Grave Mixture, put it in!   Tell me, other than the beautiful Tannenberg that was beautifully restored by T&B, when is the last time an organ-builder restored an organ without changing it (especially an electro-pneumatic organ)?   Best,   Nate    
(back) Subject: this week's SECOND mp3 From: "Jonathan Orwig" <giwro@adelphia.net> Date: Tue, 29 Mar 2005 20:56:21 -0800   Now that Easter is past, I find myself with the time to REALLY have some fun   Please have a listen and (hopefully) enjoy Pietro Yon's Toccata It's not a profound masterpiece, but it is great fun (and it's actually much easier than it sounds)   HQ version - (8.84 mb) http://evensongmusic.net/audio/YonToccata.mp3   LQ version (1.46mb) http://evensongmusic.net/audio/LQ/YonToccataLQ.mp3   Enjoy...   -- Jonathan Orwig Evensong Music, Media and Graphics New Organ Music http://www.evensongmusic.net   (BTW, for the copyright-conscious among you, this was published in 1912, so it is long since in Public Domain)    
(back) Subject: And now for something completely different... From: <Justinhartz@aol.com> Date: Wed, 30 Mar 2005 02:11:58 EST   Dear Pipechatters:   Your help is requested.   Can anybody recommend an organ composition featuring "In the Garden"?   O.K. Laugh all you want!   I really mean it.   All you OHS members will understand.   Just don't report me to the AAM police :)     Cheers, Justin Hartz