PipeChat Digest #5311 - Tuesday, May 3, 2005
 
Re:Something Special: Colleges and Universities with Organ
  by <RMB10@aol.com>
Eastern European organ culture (was "...Belarus")
  by "Stephen Roberts" <sroberts01@snet.net>
Re: Eastern European organ culture
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: Eastern European organ culture
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net>
Call for tune suggestions
  by "Millie & David Kenney" <kenn411@bellsouth.net>
colleges/universities
  by "Dr. Amy Fleming" <docamy@alltel.net>
Re: Eastern European organ culture
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: colleges/universities
  by "Shirley" <pnst.shirley@verizon.net>
organ study at university level
  by "Randy Terry" <randy@peacham.homeip.net>
Re: Colleges/Universities
  by "Desiree'" <nicemusica@yahoo.com>
Re: organ study at university level
  by "Desiree'" <nicemusica@yahoo.com>
re:Colleges/Universities
  by <RMB10@aol.com>
Re: colleges/universities
  by "Shelley Culver" <culverse@westminster.edu>
 

(back) Subject: Re:Something Special: Colleges and Universities with Organ From: <RMB10@aol.com> Date: Tue, 3 May 2005 07:16:33 EDT   Don't forget about Dr. James Moeser who is the Chancellor of the = University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, was formerly the VP of Academic Affairs = and Provost of the University of South Carolina, and then the Chancellor of = then University of Nebraska before returning to the Carolinas. He was first a = concert organist and organ professor at the University of Kansas and worked his = way up the academic ladder, joining the faculty of Penn State, where he was the Dean of the College of Arts and Architecture. First and foremost, he is a = past president of the AGO. I don't know many non-professor types that can = claim that title.     Monty Bennett  
(back) Subject: Eastern European organ culture (was "...Belarus") From: "Stephen Roberts" <sroberts01@snet.net> Date: Tue, 3 May 2005 04:42:16 -0700 (PDT)   Dear List Friends: Thanks to Colin and Amy for their kind compliments concerning my posting = about my tour of Belarus. Colin posed several questions, and I will try = to answer them briefly. The "Toccata" of Mushel is indeed part of a larger work, "Uzbek Suite". = The suite consists of a beautiful "Aria", the well-known Toccata, and a = fugue. Mushel was known as a counterpoint expert in Soviet times. He = taught at the conservatory in Tashkent, hence the "Uzbek" title. The = suite is based on folk melodies of Uzbekistan. C.F Peters publishes an = anthology of works by Soviet composers that contains the Aria and Toccata = (in its original form, not the somewhat altered version published in the = Oxford anthology), but the concluding Fugue is omitted in the Peters = edition. The work was published by a Soviet publishing house, but I do = not believe that it is still in print. The libraries of most = conservatories in countries of the former Soviet Union have copies of the = suite. I have a photocopy of the fugue that I just obtained while in = Belarus, but that's all. I have never been able to find a complete copy = of Mushel's "Uzbek Suite" in seven trips to Russia and the other former Soviet countries. As for the organ landscape of Hungary, it was as one might expect = virtually identical to that of Austria before 1918, because Hungary was = the other half of the dual monarchy of Austria-Hungary. I have visited = Hungary a couple of times, but both visits were over 30 years ago. I can = tell you that there are several Hungarian organ building firms, and I have = a CD recorded on a locally made organ. There are very fine organ classes = at the largest conservatories and music schools in Hungary, and they are = producing some superb players. Istvan Ruppert, the organ professor in = Budapest and in Gyor (sorry for the missing diacritical) is a good friend = of mine, as well as of Joe Routon, another member of the organ e-lists. = Istvan is a great guy, and a very fine musician. There are other = excellent organ teachers in Hungary, too, so I am told. I hope to get = there again one of these days. Latvia has one of the most interesting organ landscapes of all Eastern = European countries. Latvians are most Lutherans, and the big Lutheran = churches and Cathedrals there have some very great organs, indeed. The = Riga (not "Rieger" as Colin wrote; I'm sure that must have been a slip of = the finger) Cathedral is home to one of the greatest surviving German = romantic organs: the great Walcker organ of 1883. The Walcker is one of = the largest mechanical action organs in the world; it has about 120 stops = as I recall. It is one of the most exciting organs that I have ever = played; fellow list member, Agnes Armstrong, who has also played this = organ in recital, would heartily agree with that assessment, I'm sure. = Agnes and I have discussed this organ and the impression it made on us = many times. Alas, as I have been told, the Riga Dom is closed at the = moment; structural problems were discovered about a year ago, and it had = to be closed for safety reasons. Perhaps someone in this forum knows whether or not it has been re-opened. But the Riga Dom organ, despite its immense size and fame, is not the = largest mechanical action organ in Latvia. I believe that title must go = to the 1886 Barnim Gruneberg organ in Trinity Cathedral in Liepaja. I = played a recital in Liepaja over ten years ago; during Soviet times the = city was completely off limits to foreigners, as there was a very = important secret Soviet submarine base there. The Trinity Cathedral organ = is about 135 stops! It has some Barker assistance, but it is a real = knuckle-buster, I can tell you. It is in sore need of a restoration, = unless something has been done to it recently. As Agnes can attest, all of the Baltic countries have organ cultures, and = there are organs and organists there. This is still "terra incognita" to = most people outside those countries. There are some beautiful cities = there, interesting organs, and some very nice people, as I can personally = attest. They also need your tourist dollars, so if you're interested, = take a trip! It's one of the few places where the dollar still goes = pretty far, too, to those of us who live in the USA. Stephen Roberts Western CT State University, Danbury, CT USA  
(back) Subject: Re: Eastern European organ culture From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Tue, 3 May 2005 05:16:20 -0700 (PDT)   Hello,   Thanks to Stephen for the information about Mushel's "Uzbeck Suite".   For those interested, I would recommend a visit to the "Het Orgel" (Netherlands) web-site, which includes, in the links section, a vast number of things to see and HEAR!   http://www.hetorgel.nl/   One of the most fascinating countries is that of Poland, and in Gdansk you will find a huge 5-manual instrument, and about 51 organs in Warsaw alone! Krakow has at least 10 organs listed.   However, the history of Polish instruments is very extensive, with some going back to the 15th century. The casework photographs alone are worth a browse. The decorations and wood-carving are nothing short of extraordinary....even fantastic.   There is a whole world (and a very rich one) awaiting discovery by us "Westeners"....not just organs, but organists and important COMPOSERS, as well as academies, summer schools and international competitions. At the forefront are the Hungarians, but I feel sure that other countries have worthy traditions. Romania has a number of fascinating instruments, so they must presumably have organists!   I have some splendid mp3 recordings from the former EasternBloc countries, all gathered from the internet. Included among them are some remarkable improvisations.   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK   PS: Riga-Kloss? Who are they? ;-)       --- Stephen Roberts <sroberts01@snet.net> wrote:     > > Thanks to Colin and Amy for their kind compliments > concerning my posting about my tour of Belarus. > Colin posed several questions, and I will try to > answer them briefly. >     __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around http://mail.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Re: Eastern European organ culture From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net> Date: Tue, 3 May 2005 08:05:04 -0500     > PS: Riga-Kloss? Who are they? ;-)   Actually the firm is named "Rieger-Kloss." When the Austro-Hungarian = Empire was split up after World War I, the old Austrian firm of Rieger split into two firms -- the Rieger firm in Austria and Rieger-Kloss in = Czechoslavakia. After World War II, when Czechoslavakia was behind the Iron Curtain, the firm worked mostly in Eastern Bloc countries. Since the collapse of the Soviet Union and the emergence of a democratic Czech Republic, = Rieger-Kloss have also been doing quite a bit of work elsewhere as well, and they have recently built a couple of new organs in the United States. They have a website at http://rieger-kloss.cz/   John Speller      
(back) Subject: Call for tune suggestions From: "Millie & David Kenney" <kenn411@bellsouth.net> Date: Tue, 3 May 2005 9:14:52 -0400   Jonathan -   How about. . .   Aurelia (The Church's One Foundation) Slane (Be Thou My Vision) New Britain (Amazing Grace)   Thanks for considering all of us for input into the new volume.   Take care, and best wishes,   David Kenney    
(back) Subject: colleges/universities From: "Dr. Amy Fleming" <docamy@alltel.net> Date: Tue, 3 May 2005 08:39:43 -0500   What in your opinion, are the best colleges/universities for a music = major, specifically one in piano or organ. Thanks (that should start some = spirited discussion!) Wanting to know for my daughter's possible future. Amy       -- No virus found in this outgoing message. Checked by AVG Anti-Virus. Version: 7.0.308 / Virus Database: 266.11.1 - Release Date: 5/2/2005    
(back) Subject: Re: Eastern European organ culture From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Tue, 3 May 2005 09:05:12 -0700 (PDT)   Hello,   Thanks for that John.....it was a bit of a joke, because I had referred to 'Rieger' in Latvia, when it should have been Riga.   I was thinking of Rieger-Kloss when I wrote it.   However, John raises an interesting fact, that organ-building seems to be very strong in the Czech Republic, with quite a number of organ-builders active in the region.   In fact, I am currently ploughing through almost every Eastern European web-site which relate to organs and keeping notes. It isn't original research of course, but it is very interesting, and perhaps I will be able to cobble together some interesting discoveries on the way.   One thing which has taken me by surprise (though I'm sure many better educated souls than I will know it already) is the sheer scale of Petr Eben's compositions!!   He really is a MAJOR composer, with a vast range of music covering many different genres.   I've thus far come across organists who compose symphonies (real ones....for orchestra) and others who are multi-talented in Slovakia, Bulgaria, Romania, Poland and elsewhere.   It's a HUGE subject, and the wealth of the organ culture almost beggars belief.   As you can guess, I'm on a 'learning curve' and enjoying it enormously.   More later!   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK     -- "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net> wrote: > > Actually the firm is named "Rieger-Kloss." When the > Austro-Hungarian Empire > was split up after World War I, the old Austrian > firm of Rieger split into > two firms -- the Rieger firm in Austria and > Rieger-Kloss in Czechoslavakia.     __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around http://mail.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Re: colleges/universities From: "Shirley" <pnst.shirley@verizon.net> Date: Tue, 03 May 2005 12:53:49 -0400       On 3 May 2005 at 8:39, Dr. Amy Fleming expounded:   > What in your opinion, are the best colleges/universities for a music > major, specifically one in piano or organ. Thanks (that should start > some spirited discussion!) Wanting to know for my daughter's possible > future. Amy   Amy, it depends on her ultimate goals. Does she want to be a concert = musician? Does she want to accompany solo singers or choral groups? Does she want = to teach music to children? Does she want to be a church musician?   --Shirley, BMus (Music Education, Piano Concentration), Temple University, 1993 MAR (Liturgy & Music, Organ), Lutheran Theological Seminary at = Philadelphia, in progress    
(back) Subject: organ study at university level From: "Randy Terry" <randy@peacham.homeip.net> Date: Tue, 3 May 2005 10:42:39 -0700   Without going into the many valid reasons to dissuade anyone from going = into classical music as a profession, I'd like to recommend the following organ department as one of the top programs in the country:   East Carolina University. The professor is Dr. Janette Fishell. I've studied with several well-known teachers, and Dr. Fishell ranks first on = my list. She is equally gifted as both a performer and teacher, as her active concert schedule will attest. Her students have won numerous competitions. =     The organ and sacred music program at ECU is top-notch, and they will soon begin use of a new organ, built by C. B. Fisk. The organ will be = installed in the new nave of Dr. Fishell's church, which was designed in tandem with the organ, and the church has granted the university the use of the organ for teaching, practice, and recitals in perpetuity. There are several nice organs on campus for teaching and practice.   Anyone wanting to study with a fabulous teacher in a great environment should definitely check out ECU!   +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ Randy Terry Music Minister The Episcopal Church of St. Peter Redwood City, California        
(back) Subject: Re: Colleges/Universities From: "Desiree'" <nicemusica@yahoo.com> Date: Tue, 3 May 2005 10:52:06 -0700 (PDT)   Hi Amy. Well, thats a question that is hard to answer, regarding the best college = or universioty for piano or organ. I think it's very possible to say that = we all think the school we went/ are going to is the best for organ study. = It's all opinions. Even just yesterday, Master. Michael Barone made a post = on the other list of a student who changed schools because of his taste = for playing Bach. It depends on the individual. Som thoughts: Just about every school has piano as a major in their music department. = That having been said, it's rather difficult, IMHO, to say that a school = with a good piano program has a good organ program. It depends upon what your daughter wishes to do with her career. Im my = search, I narrowed down to 9 schools, and out of 9 schools, applied to 3. = I was accepted by all three. All three schools have very strong Choral = Instructors as well as very good Organ professors. The school that I have = chosen has a very unique Liberal Arts component. That is, for BFA and BMus = students, it is almost a Conservatory type of liberal arts component, in = that a lot of classes that are required by Pre Med Majors, or BBA students = are not required of BFA or B Mus students. That's often something that is = very good for a Music student. My desires and interests are mixed. I want = to be a somewhat active recitalist, but I want to be a seasoned Sacred = Musician, most. So, a places with very good organ AND choral teachers are = what I narrowed down to. Are your daughters goals to be a concert performer or a sacred musician = that is of a very professional caliber? Each program varies in what they = will teach, and even their audition requirements. If you recall Monty = Bennett's post about 6 weeks ago about audition repertoire, some schools = have different requirements for different degrees. If you want to do Music = Education with Organ Primary, you may do two contrasting pieces. = Performance. majors may do three pieces with one from memory. The same = goes as far as the teaching. A person with a goal of being a Concert = musician may have to do a Junior and Senior recital, with one being from = memory. An aspiring Sacred Musician may present a Senior Recital and close = it with one of the Grand Choeur's of Theodore Salome or Durufle' Choral = Varie. While there are schools closing, there are other programs that are being = revitalized, and some even starting off brand new. Does your dauhter want = a church position? Is she interested in major metropolotain areas that may = have many fine organs for her to see and possibly play? There's lots out there. Best of luck in her search. It can be a difficult = one. TDH   __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around http://mail.yahoo.com
(back) Subject: Re: organ study at university level From: "Desiree'" <nicemusica@yahoo.com> Date: Tue, 3 May 2005 11:08:56 -0700 (PDT)   Dr Fishell is a very nice lady, too. That, and East Carolina is one of 2 = or 3 Publically Funded Universities that offers Sacred Music. Many will = not offer anything Church-related due to Church/State seperation. Others that are great with really nice professors that are great playes = and teachers: Peidmont College in Demorest GA (Melichamp, and New Cassavant) University of Houston (Bates) Texas Christian University, Ft Worth (Joseph Butler) Southern Methodist U, Dallas (Palmer) Montclair State University, Montclair, NJ (Kenneth Hamrick) Georgia State University, Atlanta (Sarah Martin) University of Alabama (Freese) San Jose State University is beginning a revitalization of Organ (Simi) Texas A/M INTERNATIONAL looks to be revitalizing their program with a new = Kegg due in 2006. The university President is also avery accomplished = organist and Organist/Choirmaster at a church in Laredo. University of TX at Austin (Speller, and the Hancocks) Florida State University (corzine) U of Florida (A new Lady took Will Bodine's place) U of Washington at Seattle (Terry, Butler)   If you think about it, there really are very many good places that are = still with Organ programs, and have no plans of cutting them. Just gotta = make a list of your long and short term goals, and what you want during = your college experience., such as jobs, exposrue tomany fine organs, etc.     __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around http://mail.yahoo.com
(back) Subject: re:Colleges/Universities From: <RMB10@aol.com> Date: Tue, 3 May 2005 14:19:14 EDT   Desiree'- Why do you always feel that you need to quote me in a post? I am not an encyclopedia, nor am I the end all or be all of everything related to the = organ or church music. While I would like to feel that I am, there are others who know more than I do, but you always seem to manage to quote or misquote = something I have posted. What's the deal?   In regards to your post, where are you going to go to college? You = haven't told us where you've applied, except that you've told me that you the = colleges you had applied to needed your transcripts. How can you be accepted to a college without a formal transcript?   As to repetoire, no senior recital I have attended, nor the one I played, would have allowed me to play something like the Salome' you mentioned. = The complete Durufle' Prelude, Adagio AND Chorale Variations would be = something that would most likely be found on most students' recitals or a major Prelude = and Fugue of Bach, such as the D Major 532, the Fantasia and Fugue in g minor, = any of the Toccata and Fugues, etc., or one of the Dupre preludes and fugues. = The senior recital is generally a time to showcase a wide variety of periods = of of music and is an academic program, not an entertainment concert, such as = one would find on a Sunday afternoon at the local church sponsored by the = Women's Circle to raise money to add a set of chimes to the organ or a = zimbelstern.   Monty Bennett  
(back) Subject: Re: colleges/universities From: "Shelley Culver" <culverse@westminster.edu> Date: Tue, 03 May 2005 14:31:57 -0400   Amy (and all)--   I go to a very fine college for organ and piano -- Westminster College in = New Wilmington, PA (NOT the choir college, before anyone asks!). Our organ = program is growing steadily. We have three different tracks for organ: Music Ed with emphasis in organ -- BM degree with teacher certification. = Music ed majors take one hour of lessons per week and present a senior = recital -- 30 to 40 minutes.=20   Sacred Music -- BM in Sacred Music, one hour of lessons a week, also 4 = semesters of piano lessons. A senior recital is required -- an hour = recital, usually. A junior recital is optional, but I'm doing one next = semester -- probably 40 minutes of music.   Organ performance -- BM in Organ Performance, 2 hours of lessons a week, 4 = semesters of piano, maybe some voice lessons too. A junior recital and a = senior recital is required.=20   WC is also a liberal arts college, so you have to take some classes = outside the major, but I've mostly enjoyed those.=20   Hope that helps a lil! Shelley   >>> docamy@alltel.net 05/03/05 9:39 AM >>> What in your opinion, are the best colleges/universities for a music = major, specifically one in piano or organ. Thanks (that should start some = spirited discussion!) Wanting to know for my daughter's possible future. Amy