PipeChat Digest #5314 - Wednesday, May 4, 2005
 
Music for organ and piano
  by "Tania Durova" <tania.durova@skynet.be>
Re: Music for organ and piano
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
RE: Music for organ and piano
  by "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
Jarle's response
  by <Keys4bach@aol.com>
RE: Music for organ and piano
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
FW: Felix Hell in Baltimore.  Recital announcement
  by "Hell-Concerts@t-online.de" <Hell-Concerts@t-online.de>
Re: When is a pipe organ not a pipe organ?
  by "Andy Lawrence" <lawrenceandy@gmail.com>
James Welch at Cadet Chapel (was: Mushel Toccata)
  by "Pat Maimone" <patmai@juno.com>
Russian Organ Music discoveries
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: When is a pipe organ not a pipe organ?
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Eastern European organ music
  by "Stephen Roberts" <sroberts01@snet.net>
Student degree recital - Gustavo Andres
  by "Stephen Roberts" <sroberts01@snet.net>
Re: Student degree recital - Gustavo Andres
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net>
Re: When is a pipe organ not a pipe organ?
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net>
Re: When is a pipe organ not a pipe organ?
  by "Charles & Maria DeVita-Krug" <cdkrug@worldnet.att.net>
Organs in Italy
  by "Jan & Leland Smith" <lfs@naxs.com>
announcing....
  by "Jonathan Orwig" <giwro@adelphia.net>
Re: When is a pipe organ not a pipe organ?
  by "Jim McFarland" <mcfarland6@juno.com>
RE: When is a pipe organ not a pipe organ?
  by "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
RE: Music for organ and piano
  by "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
Re: Organs in Italy
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
 

(back) Subject: Music for organ and piano From: "Tania Durova" <tania.durova@skynet.be> Date: Wed, 4 May 2005 11:45:11 +0200   Organ and Piano : Did you guys think about Harald Genzmer (Germany), or Chris Dubois (Belgium) ?   Tania Durova  
(back) Subject: Re: Music for organ and piano From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Wed, 4 May 2005 04:05:53 -0700 (PDT)   Hello,   I guess we didn't.....but I DID think of transcribing the infamous John Cage work "The sounds of silence" for "an organ being rebuilt" and "electronic piano with blown fuse".   It's a work which requires a certain tacit understanding on the part of the performers; especially in the choreography of the final bow, to enlightened silent applause.   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK       --- Tania Durova <tania.durova@skynet.be> wrote:   > Organ and Piano : > Did you guys think about Harald Genzmer (Germany), > or Chris Dubois (Belgium) ?     __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around http://mail.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: RE: Music for organ and piano From: "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Wed, 4 May 2005 23:15:08 +1200     >I guess we didn't.....but I DID think of transcribing the infamous John Cage work "The sounds of silence" for "an organ being rebuilt" and "electronic piano with blown fuse".   Don't bother doing it. I've already done so. I can honestly say that it receieved what it deserved.   Ross    
(back) Subject: Jarle's response From: <Keys4bach@aol.com> Date: Wed, 4 May 2005 07:33:26 EDT   So Jonathan, how can you NOT write one on that tune. THIS IS WHEN THIS LIST IS SOOOO COOL! Thanks Jarle and thanks Administrators! dale sweating with the oldies in Wrinklewood Florida  
(back) Subject: RE: Music for organ and piano From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Wed, 4 May 2005 05:00:57 -0700 (PDT)   Hello,   I hope you managed to scrape it all off before it dried Ross!   Regards,   Colin MItchell UK     --- TheShieling <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> wrote: >   > > Don't bother doing it. I've already done so. I can > honestly say that it > receieved what it deserved.     __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around http://mail.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: FW: Felix Hell in Baltimore. Recital announcement From: "Hell-Concerts@t-online.de" <Hell-Concerts@t-online.de> Date: Wed, 4 May 2005 15:06:44 +0200           -----Original Message----- Date: Wed, 4 May 2005 10:17:41 +0200 Subject: Felix Hell in Baltimore. Recital announcement From: "Hell-Concerts@t-online.de" <Hell-Concerts@t-online.de> To: PIPORG-L@LISTSERV.ALBANY.EDU   Dear listmember and friends,   this is to announce Felix Hell's recital at the Peabody Conservatory in Baltimore.   Date: May 8, 2005 Time: 8 pm Location: The Peabody Institute, Baltimore, Griswold Hall Organ: Holtkamp (organ spec on the Peabody website)   Program   JSBach Piece d'Orgue, G Major, BWV 572   Clerambeault Suite in the 2nd tone   Dupre Variations on a Noel   Brahms Fugue Aflat minor   Reger Fantasy and Fugue on B-A-C-H   If you are in the area, Felix would be glad if you would attend.   Hans-Friedrich Hell       ****************************************************************** "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org>   Dear List,   just received a note from PIPORG-L listmember Jack Clotworthy, saying that there must be an error regarding the time. I checked, and have to confess that I goofed here.   The correct time is 5 pm on Sunday, May 8.   Sorry for any confusion.   Hans-Friedrich Hell          
(back) Subject: Re: When is a pipe organ not a pipe organ? From: "Andy Lawrence" <lawrenceandy@gmail.com> Date: Wed, 4 May 2005 06:22:45 -0700   This discussion has been a bit silly. We're supposed to be helping this poor guy figure out how to draw a line. To say one electronic stop makes it not a pipe organ is absurd. Also absurd to say 25 electronic stops with one rank of pipes is a pipe organ. Even discounting an organ with a whole electronic division as a non-pipeorgan does not work. Suppose someone added an electronic division to the wanamaker organ, making no other modifications. Not a pipe organ now? Come on people!   Here's what I propose. Its not perfect but its the only viable option so far in this thread. If you have a complete instrument without the electronic stops, its a pipe organ. Therefore, Moller's magnum opus of 205 ranks in Charlotte, NC, for example, is a pipe organ even though it has an entire electronic division and quite a few electronic stops. Things get more debatable on smaller instruments where, say, all the reeds are electronic. I think this could still be a "pipe organ" because there are real, viable pipe organs without reeds.=20 Ultimately, a hard fast rule probably won't work, but the general principle of "if you take away the electronics, is it still an organ" will steer us in the right direction. From there, probably a judgement call, just as the OHS has to judge each organ separately for historic worthiness.   Andy   On 4/29/05, Arie Vandenberg <ArieV@classicorgan.com> wrote: > At 07:41 PM 2005-04-28, you wrote: > In a message dated 4/28/05 1:54:41 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time, > ArieV@ClassicOrgan.com writes: > I may not be of much help here, but APOBA (American Pipe Organ Builders= =20 > Association), has a definition of a pipe organ that states that all stops= =20 > should be pipe, with the only allowances being 32' stops and Chimes. >=20 > Association), has a definition of a pipe organ that states that all stops= =20 > should be pipe, with the only allowances being 32' stops and Chimes. >=20 > May I be so bold as to ask for a bit more clarification? I had understoo= d > that the APOBA specifies that digital 32 pedal stops, percussions and > "extensions" are allowed. AM I correct here or did I misunderstand > something somewhere? I know that entire divisions or a division with one= or > two pipe ranks and the rest being digital are no no's. >=20 > Scott, >=20 > What do you mean by "extensions" - bottom octave of an 8' rank?, botto= m > of 16' stops, some of the 32' stops? >=20 > Arie V. >=20 >  
(back) Subject: James Welch at Cadet Chapel (was: Mushel Toccata) From: "Pat Maimone" <patmai@juno.com> Date: Wed, 4 May 2005 09:34:46 -0400   Dear Pipechatters,   Thanks to Brent Johnson for mentioning a performance of the Mushel Toccata by James Welch, who will perform in the Distinguished Organists Recital Series at West Point's Cadet Chapel this Sunday, May 8 (yes, Mother's Day) at 3 PM. That is West Point in the Hudson Valley of New York, zip code 10996.   Admission is free. Be prepared to show photo ID at the gate and if you are driving, to open your trunk for the security guard(s).   I shall post his program later today. For info directly from West Point, please write Organist/Director of Music Craig Williams at craig.williams@usma.edu or call him at 845-938-7352 [voice mail].   Hope to see some of you there!   Pat Maimone, who is playing the Austin organ at Grace Episcopal Church in Middletown, NY, for a free concert of two Haydn Masses - the "Little Organ" Mass and the "Theresa" Mass - Saturday night, May 7, at 7 PM. Janiece Kohler conducts the Orange County Classic Choral Society and Orchestra. You are welcome to attend this one, also.   patmai@juno.com   Regions II and III Convention, Poughkeepsie June 22-25, 2005 http://chvago.org  
(back) Subject: Russian Organ Music discoveries From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Wed, 4 May 2005 06:39:11 -0700 (PDT)   Hello,   How timely that I should currently be scouring the world of Eastern Bloc organ culture.   How utterly embarrassing that, having made the claim that Russian Organ Music is a bit thin on the ground, I now discover that I am actually extremely uneducated!   The following will be of interest.   RUSSIAN ORGAN MUSIC LIST:-   ANDREJ TCHULOVSKY: COMPOSITIONS   Margit Dressel, musicologist, critic (Germany): =ABTchulovsky feels himself especially well on the rich organ landscape of the Thuringia . (...) He has embodied his admire of the Thuringia in the organ fantasia composed by him. It is a melodious inspired-joyful piece about forests, mountains and plains. It was not forgotten also the voice of small bird=BB.   Johan G. Koers (The Netherlands): =ABI'd like to call 3 Chorale preludes from the =ABSwedish Notebook=BB by Tchulovsky as a charming pearls=BB   Regina Arbouw, musicologist, critic (The Netherlands): =ABAlbert-Schweitzer-Variations=BB is seven variations on an ancient theme =ABDiscendi Santo Spirito=BB. The ancient original theme, passing in a changed kind through ornate variations, every time resembled of itself and introduced calmness=BB.   =ABMeininger Tageblatt=BB (Germany): =ABSimilarly to a saddle-point mining mountaines five =ABSchweitzer-variations=BB which have appeared on the verge between classic harmony and modernistic novations have faced it=BB.     MIKAEL TARIVERDIEV   THE WORKS FOR ORGAN 1985 Concerto &#8470;1 for organ =93Kassandra=94 in four parts   1988 Symphony for reciter =93Chernobyl=94 in two parts: 1. =93Zone=94, 2. =93Qvo vadis=94   1988 Concerto &#8470;2 for organ. Polyphonic notebook in four parts.   1989 Concerto &#8470;3 for organ in four parts: 1.=93Reflectiong=94, 2.=93Moving=94, 3.=94Choral=94, 4.=94Walking in C-dur=94.   1995 Ten chorals for organ (=93Imitation of Old Master=94). Dedicated to the Spanish Infanta Helen   GOLUBKOV Sergey V. (b. 1969)   Circulus disjunctus, Passacaglia for Organ. First performance 1992. Manuscript is reprinted in: Golubkov S. Composition Method Based on All-Interval Set: Synthesis of Serial and Modal Organisation. Appendix: Circulus disjunctus, Passacaglia for Organ (1991) // Musical Art of the &#1061;&#1061; Century: collected articles, issue 2, ed. by T.Dubravskaya. Moscow, 1995, p. 159=96171   Concerto for Organ and Orchestra. Inserted in Homo Ludens, Symphony-Concerto for Organ, Piano and Orchestra (Parts I, III)     Fugue and Postlude for Organ. First performance 1995     Homo Ludens, Symphony-Concerto for Organ, Piano and Orchestra. First performance 1993. Grand Prix of the International Competition of Composers "Nadzeya=9694" (1994, Belarus, Grodno). Storage of duplicates of the score and parts: Moscow, Moscow Tchaikovsky State Conservatory, Taneyev Scientific Musical Library, Department of Storage   Prelude and Fugue on the Name BACH for Organ. First performance 1990     ALEXANDER FISEISKY He has produced a scholastic edition of Russian organ music. This three-volume anthology offers a representative cross-section of organ music from Latvia (BA 8421), Estonia (BA 8422) and Lithuania (BA8423).     -o-o-o-o-o-o-o-     I hope this is of value to those who asked about Russian Organ Music.   I don't expect I'll find much organ music written in Bulgaria.........watch this space!!       Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK     __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around http://mail.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Re: When is a pipe organ not a pipe organ? From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Wed, 4 May 2005 06:41:37 -0700 (PDT)   Hello,   That's awfully clever Andy!!   Regards,   Colin MItchell UK     --- Andy Lawrence <lawrenceandy@gmail.com> wrote: > This discussion has been a bit silly. > Here's what I propose. > If you have a complete > instrument without the > electronic stops, its a pipe organ.   __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around http://mail.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Eastern European organ music From: "Stephen Roberts" <sroberts01@snet.net> Date: Wed, 4 May 2005 06:47:53 -0700 (PDT)   Dear List Friends: The countries of what used to be called "Middle Europe" have produced a = great deal of organ literature, much of which deserves to be better known = outside that region. As was pointed out earlier, Petr Eben has been a = very prolific composer of organ music, and his output includes some really = fine pieces. There are many other composers who have written excellent = pieces, too. For those of you interested in Russian organ literature, there are two = collections that should be known to you. Unfortunately I don't have the = exact information on one of them, but you should be able to find it = without much trouble. The first is Peters edition Nr. 5750, <Orgelmusik = des 20. Jahrhunderts aus Russland und Osteuropa>, an excellent anthology. = It contains the "Aria" of Mushel discussed earlier, as well as the = "Toccata". There is also an arrangement of the "Passacaglia" from the = Opera "Katerina Izmailova" of Shostakovich. I say "arrangement", because = it is not exactly like the original version ( a transcription by the = composer of an orchestral interlude from his opera) published by = Shostakovich. Shostakovich didn't know very much about writing for the = organ, and the original version published by a Soviet publishing house = presents many problems. I own a copy of the original version, too, which = I purchased in St. Petersburg some years ago. The Peters anthology was edited by the late Leonid Roismann, who was the professor of organ at = Moscow Conservatory during the late Soviet period; Roismann was by all = accounts a fine organist and a very gifted teacher. There is a problem = with Roismann's edition of the Shostakovich, however: it changes a number = of the composer's original markings concerning articulation, and omits = some marks of interpretation that are very helpful to the performer. = Whether or not Roismann discussed these changes with the composer--he may = well have done so--I do not know, and both composer and editor are gone = now. In terms of sheer playability, however, the Peters edition is vastly = superior to the original, and it solves most of the problems presented by = the original transcription by the composer. The other anthology I do not have handy at home, but it is a three volume = set published either by Baerenreiter or Breitkopf. The editor of this set = is Alexander Fiseisky, one of the best known Russian organists; Fiseisky = was a pupil of Roismann, by the way. This set has a very extensive = preface which contains a great deal of information about the history of = the organ in Russia. There are many Russian pieces for organ, at least = one of which dates back to the end of the 18th century. Works by Glinka, = Gliere, Glazunov, and other well known Russian composers are included, = though alas there are no compositions by Tchaikovsky (or perhaps more = accurately, "Chaikovskiy") among them. It is a little known fact that = Tchaikovsky studied the organ when he was young. I highly recommend this = three volume anthology for those of you interested in this little known = body of organ literature. These days few Russians are playing these = pieces either, except when they are on tour abroad. I trust that this information may be of some use to at least some of you. Stephen Roberts Western CT State University, Danbury, CT USA  
(back) Subject: Student degree recital - Gustavo Andres From: "Stephen Roberts" <sroberts01@snet.net> Date: Wed, 4 May 2005 07:10:23 -0700 (PDT)   Dear List, The discussion of literature for degree recitals has prompted me to make a = plug for my own student's Junior degree recital. Gustavo Andres, a native = of Buenos Aires, Argentina, will play his Junior recital on a very = auspicious day: Friday the thirteenth! :) The recital is in partial = fulfillment of the degree requirements for the Bachelor of Music in organ = performance from Western Connecticut State University. The recital will = take place Friday, May 13 at 8 p.m. at St. Peter's Church in Danbury. The = organ is a three manual, 40 rank Peragallo from 1994. Gustavo is a very = accomplished performer, who was formerly the organist of the Basilica of = the Sacred Heart in Buenos Aires. I have often told Gustavo that I wish = that he could have brought the organ there with him: it is a very fine = Cavaille-Coll/Mutin! Gustavo's program will be the following: Fantaisie and Fugue in g minor, BWV 542 - J.S. Bach Unter den Linden Gruene - J. P. Sweelinck Sonata I - Felix Mendelssohn (short intermission) Symphonie II: First movement - Louis Vierne Nun komm, der Heiden Heiland, BWV 659 - J.S. Bach Prelude and Fugue in B major - Marcel Dupre At WCSU the junior recital is generally 3/4 of a full recital. The = student plays a full recital (at least an hour's worth of music in terms = of playing time) for the Senior recital. I know that Gustavo plans to = play the entire Durufle' <Suite> Op. 5 for his Senior recital. I = generally insist that the recital represent a variety of periods, moods, = composers, and styles. It is my own personal philosophy that the = undergraduate years should be a time when the student is building his or = her technique, repertoire, and knowledge and command of different styles = and periods or organ literature. I insist that my students get a balanced = diet with great variety, and learn major representative works by the most = important composers and schools of organ literature. The undergraduate = years are not the time for specialization, it seems to me. If students = are most interested in a particular body of repertoire, they can = specialize in it when they are in graduate school or out of school altogether. There is so much to do in four short undergraduate years. It is essential = that a student not only learn organ literature, but also learn many = practical skills to be an effective professional organist. Virtually all = organists are church musicians, and church musicians must wear many hats. = The task of doing all of this seems overwhelming at times, but as I tell = my students, their education only begins during their formal schooling. = If done properly, formal education simply gives the student the tools for = a lifetime of self-education. That's my philosophy anyway. Stephen Roberts Western CT State University, Danbury, CT  
(back) Subject: Re: Student degree recital - Gustavo Andres From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net> Date: Wed, 4 May 2005 09:18:01 -0500     ----- Original Message -----=20 From: Stephen Roberts=20 To: PipeChat=20 Sent: Wednesday, May 04, 2005 9:10 AM Subject: Student degree recital - Gustavo Andres     Dear List,   The discussion of literature for degree recitals has prompted me to = make a plug for my own student's Junior degree recital. Gustavo Andres, = a native of Buenos Aires, Argentina, will play his Junior recital on a = very auspicious day: Friday the thirteenth! :) The recital is in = partial fulfillment of the degree requirements for the Bachelor of Music = in organ performance from Western Connecticut State University. The = recital will take place Friday, May 13 at 8 p.m. at St. Peter's Church = in Danbury. The organ is a three manual, 40 rank Peragallo from 1994. = Gustavo is a very accomplished performer, who was formerly the organist = of the Basilica of the Sacred Heart in Buenos Aires. I have often told = Gustavo that I wish that he could have brought the organ there with him: = it is a very fine Cavaille-Coll/Mutin! =20   Gustavo's program will be the following:   Fantaisie and Fugue in g minor, BWV 542 - J.S. Bach   Unter den Linden Gruene - J. P. Sweelinck   Sonata I - Felix Mendelssohn   (short intermission)   Symphonie II: First movement - Louis Vierne   Nun komm, der Heiden Heiland, BWV 659 - J.S. Bach=20   Prelude and Fugue in B major - Marcel Dupre   At WCSU the junior recital is generally 3/4 of a full recital. The = student plays a full recital (at least an hour's worth of music in terms = of playing time) for the Senior recital. I know that Gustavo plans to = play the entire Durufle' <Suite> Op. 5 for his Senior recital. I = generally insist that the recital represent a variety of periods, moods, = composers, and styles. It is my own personal philosophy that the = undergraduate years should be a time when the student is building his or = her technique, repertoire, and knowledge and command of different styles = and periods or organ literature. I insist that my students get a = balanced diet with great variety, and learn major representative works = by the most important composers and schools of organ literature. The = undergraduate years are not the time for specialization, it seems to me. = If students are most interested in a particular body of repertoire, = they can specialize in it when they are in graduate school or out of = school altogether. =20   There is so much to do in four short undergraduate years. It is = essential that a student not only learn organ literature, but also learn = many practical skills to be an effective professional organist. = Virtually all organists are church musicians, and church musicians must = wear many hats. The task of doing all of this seems overwhelming at = times, but as I tell my students, their education only begins during = their formal schooling. If done properly, formal education simply gives = the student the tools for a lifetime of self-education. That's my = philosophy anyway.   Stephen Roberts Western CT State University, Danbury, CT
(back) Subject: Re: When is a pipe organ not a pipe organ? From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net> Date: Wed, 4 May 2005 09:26:50 -0500   My proposal is that the organ should be built with all the stops prepared for. In a recent consumer survey, more that 100% of a sample of 20,000 organists were unable to tell the tell the difference between the sound of prepared for pipework and prepared for digital stops, and there is = therefore no doubt of the superior quality of prepared for stops. Furthermore, research shows that even organbuilders who normally produce poor quality work, produce prepared for stops which are equal to or even superior to = the work of the finest organbuilders, so you don't need to waste time choosing = a decent organbuilder. Organists who like to have an impressive console can spend all the available money on having a fantastic display of drawknobs, rather than wasting their money on useless pipes or electronics. Believe me, brothers and sisters, this is the wave of the future! :-)   John Speller      
(back) Subject: Re: When is a pipe organ not a pipe organ? From: "Charles & Maria DeVita-Krug" <cdkrug@worldnet.att.net> Date: Wed, 4 May 2005 12:18:58 -0400   On Wed, May 04, 2005 at 06:22:45AM -0700, Andy Lawrence wrote: > This discussion has been a bit silly. We're supposed to be helping > this poor guy figure out how to draw a line. To say one electronic > stop makes it not a pipe organ is absurd. Also absurd to say 25 > electronic stops with one rank of pipes is a pipe organ. Even > discounting an organ with a whole electronic division as a > non-pipeorgan does not work. Suppose someone added an electronic > division to the wanamaker organ, making no other modifications. Not a > pipe organ now? Come on people! >   Right. Not a pipe organ. Pack up this travesty and ship it to me, so I can ensure proper handling. Just gimme some idea how much space I have to wrangle from my wife . . . .   :)    
(back) Subject: Organs in Italy From: "Jan & Leland Smith" <lfs@naxs.com> Date: Wed, 04 May 2005 12:02:53 -0400   I am going to be in Italy this summer. If I can only hear one organ, which one would you choose? Jan    
(back) Subject: announcing.... From: "Jonathan Orwig" <giwro@adelphia.net> Date: Wed, 04 May 2005 09:29:20 -0700   The editing is DONE on my zany Toccata and Fugue, and should anyone want to torture themselves with it, they may now obtain it via my site listed below: http://www.evensongmusic.net/orwigorgan.html   Cheers,   -- Jonathan Orwig Evensong Music, Media and Graphics New Organ Music http://www.evensongmusic.net    
(back) Subject: Re: When is a pipe organ not a pipe organ? From: "Jim McFarland" <mcfarland6@juno.com> Date: Wed, 4 May 2005 12:34:56 -0400     On Wed, 4 May 2005 12:18:58 -0400 Charles & Maria DeVita-Krug <cdkrug@worldnet.att.net> writes: > On Wed, May 04, 2005 at 06:22:45AM -0700, Andy Lawrence wrote: > > This discussion has been a bit silly. We're supposed to be > helping > > this poor guy figure out how to draw a line.   Dear List:   Frankly, I do not believe that a line must be drawn.   We are way to obsessive about labeling things.   Jim  
(back) Subject: RE: When is a pipe organ not a pipe organ? From: "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Thu, 5 May 2005 06:39:52 +1200     >My proposal is that the organ should be built with all the stops prepared for. [big snip]   As usual, John, you speak profound good sense. There are other advantages too: the more prepared-for stops there are, with no chests and pipes actually provided, the smaller the organ space can be, prepared-for stops being harmed not in the slightest by a deep chancel chamber or poor acoustics. Even further, all prepared-for stops are of superb tone and = never need tuning.   Ross    
(back) Subject: RE: Music for organ and piano From: "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Thu, 5 May 2005 06:50:49 +1200   >I hope you managed to scrape it all off before it dried Ross!   Exact above quote from you, Colin. Let's get pedantic: it did not dry me = at all. On the other hand, if you meant, "....before it dried, Ross", I'd assure you that it did.   Consider the lowly comma in all its wonders.   Ross said Colin is a fool. Ross, said Colin, is a fool.   Both statements, meaning different things, may be factually correct, the difference in meaning being just two 's.   Pipe down! (That's to give this posting some relevance to the List and is not to be taken seriously). :-)   Ross    
(back) Subject: Re: Organs in Italy From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Wed, 4 May 2005 12:14:22 -0700 (PDT)   Hello,   Could we narrow this down a little?   Italy is quite long!   However, there's a biggie at Milan Cathedral, and I have details of a number of splendid Mascioni instruments in various places.   Regards,   Colin MItchell UK     --- Jan & Leland Smith <lfs@naxs.com> wrote: > I am going to be in Italy this summer. If I can > only hear one organ, > which one would you choose? Jan >   __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around http://mail.yahoo.com