PipeChat Digest #5321 - Monday, May 9, 2005
 
Student degree recital
  by "Tania Durova" <tania.durova@skynet.be>
Muschel - Toccata
  by "Tania Durova" <tania.durova@skynet.be>
Questions I have about Carillons
  by "Channing Ashbaugh" <channinga@carolina.rr.com>
Questions I have About Pipe organs
  by "Channing Ashbaugh" <channinga@carolina.rr.com>
RE: Questions I have about Carillons
  by "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
Re: Student degree recital
  by <Gfc234@aol.com>
Re: Questions I have About Pipe organs
  by <AGODRDANB@aol.com>
Re: Questions I have About Pipe organs
  by "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com>
Repertoire for Organ and Piano
  by "Tania Durova" <tania.durova@skynet.be>
Casavant Actions and more
  by "Nathan Smith" <erzahler@sbcglobal.net>
Ebay mistaken identity item
  by "Charlie Lester" <crl@137.com>
Paul Jacobs-St.Ignatius Loyola NY
  by "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net>
Re: Questions I have about Carillons
  by "Vern Jones" <soundres@foothill.net>
Re: Questions I have about Carillons
  by "Jarle Fagerheim" <jarle_fagerheim@yahoo.co.uk>
 

(back) Subject: Student degree recital From: "Tania Durova" <tania.durova@skynet.be> Date: Mon, 9 May 2005 02:13:30 +0200   Stephen, with which degree would the next student degree recital match = in the U.S. ? It's almost 3 hours all together, and   was performed on two days. Would this be a masters' or beyond ? Of = course it was combined with writing a thesis,   extensive tests in keyboard harmony and counterpoint, history of music = etc.   Thanks in advance, Tania Durova       Pieter CORNET Fantasia del primo tono - 10'00"     G. FRESCOBALDI Toccata quinta sopra gli pedali - 4'00"     J.P. SWEELINCK Unter ein Linde gr=FCn - 5'00"   D. BUXTEHUDE Prelude and fuge in g, BuxWV 149 - 7'00"     J.S. BACH Passacaglia et thema fugatum, BWV 582 - 12'00"   6 Sch=FCblerchor=E4le, BWV 645 - 650 - 18'00"     C. FRANCK 3 Chorals - 43'00"     F. LISZT Weinen, Klagen, Sorgen, Sagen - 18'00"     M. DURUFL=C9 Pr=E9lude et fugue sur le nom d'Alain, op. 7 - 12'30"     F. PEETERS Concertpiece, op.52a - 4'30"     O. MESSIAEN Transports de joie (from "L'Ascension") - 4'00"     F. POULENC Concerto in g minor - 22'00" (with orchestra)   IMPROVISATION in the style of a choral-phantasy of Buxtehude  
(back) Subject: Muschel - Toccata From: "Tania Durova" <tania.durova@skynet.be> Date: Mon, 9 May 2005 02:14:44 +0200   Pipechatters,   I just read Stephen Roberts' comment on the Toccata of Georgi Mushel. I = recently heard Belgian organ virtuoso Johan Hermans perform this piece = in a recital. He told me that he'll teach masterclasses at the famous = Gnessin-Academy of Moscow next year. He'll speak there about Belgian = organ music of the Romantic era. For his concerts performances there he = plans to perform a few more Russian pieces. Does anyone else play the = Mushel-Toccata ? And does anyone has other suggestions of interesting = Russian music ?   Tania Durova
(back) Subject: Questions I have about Carillons From: "Channing Ashbaugh" <channinga@carolina.rr.com> Date: Sun, 8 May 2005 21:01:51 -0400   Hello everyone=20       I have some questions about carillons my questions are:   1. has anyone ever seen a carillon Keyboard that looks like an organ = console? 2. Is there anyone that works with carillons where the Keyboard looks = like an organ console? 3. Does anyone like carillon music? 4. Does anyone know any females that play a Symphonic carillon Keyboard = and if show what is their names and do they play any other instruments? 5. Does anyone have any John Klein Carillon music that they have made in = to mp3s from the record albums? 6. Does anyone have any carillon music mp3s?   If you know the answers please e-mail me at channing28270@yahoo.com or = channinga@carolina.rr.com   channing    
(back) Subject: Questions I have About Pipe organs From: "Channing Ashbaugh" <channinga@carolina.rr.com> Date: Sun, 8 May 2005 21:06:39 -0400   Hello everyone=20   I have some questions about Pipe organs my questions are:   1. I would love to see how a pipe organ works at a church in Charlotte, = North Carolina that has a Pipe organ Does anyone know any Pipe organ = players from Charlotte, North Carolina? 2. Do Pipe organs have Midi? 3. What is on the inside of an Pipe Organ?   If you know the answers please e-mail me at channing28270@yahoo.com or = channinga@carolina.rr.com   channing    
(back) Subject: RE: Questions I have about Carillons From: "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Mon, 9 May 2005 13:28:45 +1200   1. has anyone ever seen a carillon Keyboard that looks like an organ console? No 2. Is there anyone that works with carillons where the Keyboard looks like an organ console? No 3. Does anyone like carillon music? Yes 4. Does anyone know any females that play a Symphonic carillon Keyboard = and if show what is their names and do they play any other instruments? No 5. Does anyone have any John Klein Carillon music that they have made in = to mp3s from the record albums? No 6. Does anyone have any carillon music mp3s? No   Here in Wellington NZ we have the 3rd-biggest carillon in the world. It's = a magnificent sound. Ross    
(back) Subject: Re: Student degree recital From: <Gfc234@aol.com> Date: Sun, 8 May 2005 21:41:32 EDT     In a message dated 5/8/05 7:16:12 PM, tania.durova@skynet.be writes:     >=20 >=20 > Stephen, with which degree would the next student degree recital match in=20 > the U.S. ?=A0 It's almost 3 hours all together, and > was performed on two days.=A0=A0 Would this be a masters' or beyond ?=A0=20= Of=20 > course it was combined with writing a thesis, > extensive tests in keyboard harmony and counterpoint, history of music et= c. > Thanks in advance, Tania Durova > =A0 > Pieter CORNET=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0Fantasia del primo tono - 10'00" >=20 > G. FRESCOBALDI=A0=A0=A0=A0Toccata quinta sopra gli pedali - 4'00" >=20 > J.P. SWEELINCK Unter ein Linde gr=FCn - 5'00" > D. BUXTEHUDE=A0=A0=A0=A0Prelude and fuge in g, BuxWV 149 - 7'00" >=20 > J.S. BACH=A0=A0=A0Passacaglia et thema fugatum, BWV 582 - 12'00" > =A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A06 Sch=FCblerchor=E4le,= BWV 645 - 650 - 18'00" >=20 > C. FRANCK=A0=A0=A03 Chorals - 43'00" >=20 > F. LISZT=A0=A0=A0=A0Weinen, Klagen, Sorgen, Sagen - 18'00" >=20 > M. DURUFL=C9=A0=A0Pr=E9lude et fugue sur le nom d'Alain, op. 7 - 12'30" >=20 > F. PEETERS=A0=A0=A0=A0Concertpiece, op.52a=A0- 4'30" >=20 > O. MESSIAEN=A0=A0Transports de joie (from "L'Ascension")=A0- 4'00" >=20 > F. POULENC=A0=A0=A0Concerto in g minor - 22'00" (with orchestra) >=20 > IMPROVISATION in the style of a choral-phantasy of Buxtehude >=20 >=20   Doctor of Musical Arts.         Gregory F. Ceurvorst 1921 Sherman Ave. #GS Evanston, IL 60201 847.332.2788 home/fax 708.243.2549 mobile gfc234@aol.com gfc234@nextel.blackberry.net    
(back) Subject: Re: Questions I have About Pipe organs From: <AGODRDANB@aol.com> Date: Sun, 8 May 2005 22:04:23 EDT   Hello Channing; There is a famous book by William H Barnes "The Contemporary American = Organ" it is back in print in soft cover and should be available at = any university library, or perhaps Barnes and Noble. This book will answer any questions you may have and it is a = wonderful resource that no organist's library should be without. Mr Barnes was quite a schoolar and organist. I grew up in Evanston Il, and the Barnes were neighbors. As i recall Mr Barnes had a four manual Austin in his home. If you buy this book you will not regret it. Regards to All Dr. Dan  
(back) Subject: Re: Questions I have About Pipe organs From: "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com> Date: Sun, 8 May 2005 21:34:08 -0500   At 10:04 PM -0400 5/8/05, AGODRDANB@aol.com wrote: > >I grew up in Evanston Il, and the Barnes were neighbors. As >i recall Mr Barnes had a four manual Austin in his home.   Dr. Dan   William Harrison Barnes did have a 4 manual organ in his home that was controlled by a redone Austin console. The console was originally a three manual that was enlarged to 4 manuals. The organ however was not an Austin. The organ was, and i quote directly from the Barnes book "Mr Gruenstein, the editor of The Diapason described it as a "thoroughbred residence organ of mongrel antecedents.'" Basically it was an organ that had been "altered, changed, rebuilt and experimented with on many occasions" - again a direct quote from the book.   The book "The Contemporary American Organ" is still a good basic reference book that does describe the workings of a pipe organ. But I think many of us would not agree with your statement that he was "quite a scholar and organist".   David  
(back) Subject: Repertoire for Organ and Piano From: "Tania Durova" <tania.durova@skynet.be> Date: Mon, 9 May 2005 02:15:26 +0200   Repertoire for Organ and Piano :=20 Did you guys think about Harald Genzmer (Germany), or Chris Dubois (Belgium) ?   Tania Durova
(back) Subject: Casavant Actions and more From: "Nathan Smith" <erzahler@sbcglobal.net> Date: Sun, 8 May 2005 23:17:56 -0400   Dear List,   Thanks for all of the replies and information. I hope I didn't gross anyone out when I was describing the pouch material! Sorry.   A few things come to mind with this discussion....   1 - I really believe that Casavant was really right up there with Skinner with the quality of their organs. Their chests and building frames have always been sturdy, their tonal specs never extreme, and the consoles easy to service. We must take care of over 20 Casavants, and out of all of those instruments, one of them has been modified, and that one minor mod was performed by Casavant (Swell mixture replaced with a Celeste); that has to count for something! I love them all, from the Phelps organs, to the 40's and 50's transitional organs... naturally, I have a soft spot for the old 1924, that's one of my all-time favorite organs. Really the only problem I can think of is the soft Zinc for the reed basses later on, but even then, all sorts of builders suffered from that... What happened to the good old Zinc anyway???   2 - I am glad that we broke the ice about the porosity issue, the discussion of which seems to be as taboo as the birds and the bees, yet everybody has to have found a solution to the problem by necessity I suspect. This is especially important to Skinnerheads like myself, whose maple-capped magnets with their tiny ports have their hands full venting the pouch itself, nevermind all of the leakage through the leather. Perhaps we can share notes about this issue. I would be interested to know if anyone has long term experience with rubber cement painted pouches, and if it causes premature toggle, stiffness, or failure. I love the airtight quality of the polylon, but it is a pain to form bag in a cloth material that favors its grain (I wish they could pour the poly on a spiral or concentric backing). We tried a new skin of the painted havana leather, but it didn't seem to be anywhere near as tough as new CPL. If I were cranking out a new organ, I'd probably use square-drops with polylon for the primaries.   3 - I look forward to getting started on the Casavant primaries pretty soon. It seems to me that since all of the ones I have opened so far have a single valve in the well, that the thickness of the valve is pretty critical for getting the proper valve beat. The stop nuts for the valves are tiny on these things; what would be the modern equivalent to them?   Oh well, first I have to finish releathering 144 Austin internal borrows, man are they tricky.   Best,   Nate    
(back) Subject: Ebay mistaken identity item From: "Charlie Lester" <crl@137.com> Date: Sun, 08 May 2005 20:55:55 -0700   Some years ago I was in an antique store and spotted a very old stopped flute pipe about 4' long standing in a corner.   I went over to have a look. When I picked it up the proprietor came over and said, "Do you know what that is...?"   Ready for a good answer I fibbed and replied, "No, what is it?"   He said, "It's an antique moose mating call from Canada."   "Oh really... Well what happens when a horny moose shows up and all you've got is this dinky little ORGAN PIPE......."   And with a cheery TOOT-TOOT on the FL=D6TE, I went on my merry way chuckling - with the proprietor standing there scratching his head.   I hope he didn't pay too much for it.......   ~ C      
(back) Subject: Paul Jacobs-St.Ignatius Loyola NY From: "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net> Date: Mon, 9 May 2005 01:40:38 -0400   Paul Jacobs at St. Ignatius Loyola, NY Thursday, April 21st, 2005   Dear Lists and Friends,   After the installation of the new Organ in St. Ignatius Loyola Church a = bit over ten years ago, the possibilities for music-making in that church grew =   exponentially. For the first time, it was possible for Kent Tritle to consider major works for choir and orchestra that included significant = Organ parts - and - now there could be Organ recitals! Move forward a decade, = many concerts in the Sacred Music in a Sacred Space series are for me warm memories, along with many wonderful Organ recitals by the greats from = around the world, and including the super greats of St. Ignatius Loyola. I was interested a couple of years ago to see that the upcoming major 8 p.m. concert offerings would be preceded by pre-concert Organ recitals at 7, in =   addition to all the regular stand-alone Organ recitals. My first reaction was something like "Wow. Isn't that too many Organ recitals!" Then, I = heard myself, and was thoroughly ashamed, even more so when, in talking with Nancianne Parrella, she commented that the church was pleased to have = these pre-concert recitals, giving more Organists a chance to play at the = church, a fine collegial sentiment. As an object lesson in the error of my ways, I =   heard a stupendous pre-concert recital by Paul Jacobs (his first time at = St. Ignatius) on April 21st, a recital for which there might not have been = room in the regular schedule. This recital preceded a great hunk of a concert with the fine orchestra Kent assembles several times a year. This is an Organ list, so I must not comment too much on the concert, other than to tell you that it began with a Haydn Sinfonia Concertante in B Flat with Violin, Cello, Oboe, and Bassoon soloists, an intricate and rich work. The =   rest of the program gave us a most powerful performance of the Beethoven Missa Solemnis. What a sound, both choral and orchestral! I am able to = sneak this mention in without guilt because there is an Organ part in Missa Solemnis, and with the Organ one half of a cross-town block from the Conductor, Choir and Orchestra, Nancianne Parrella in her high and remote perch produced every entrance precisely timed, lending great three dimensional support to the music throughout the building. (This is of particular interest considering the recent discussion on one of these = lists about an AFKAT* having been brought into the chancel of this church for = part of a performance by the Hilliard Ensemble, sponsored by Lincoln Center. I = am told that the Organist of the ensemble was reluctant to use the Pipe Organ =   upstairs because of having to deal with the great distance between the = Organ console and the music down below. To be fair, I suppose using the church's =   closed circuit TV system, giving the Organist a great view on a TV screen = of the conductor down below, takes a little getting used to. Nancianne has certainly perfected the art.   Now, back up two-and-a-half hours to Paul Jacobs - I haven't forgotten him = - He is one remarkable man, and an inspiration for us all. Paul's = biographical material in the program for his recital fills a full, large, page. Two of his, well, no word says it better, two feats, I think, stand out in = people's minds, and it is possible that some thought these were publicity gimmicks. =   It certainly did capture people's attention that Paul had not only = memorized the complete works of Messiaen, but had, in several locations, played them =   in one loooong performance. If you doubt the legitimacy of these doings, I =   can only say that we have heard from people on this list who were present = at one of these events, and they found the experience terrifically moving and =   thrilling, in a way that transcends the power of individual performances = of Messiaen's works. Paul has also given performances of the complete Bach works, although I don't believe these were in one long event. What I have just written about him only scratches the surface. The list of his performances in many parts of the U.S. and the world is enormous. Evidence =   of the importance of these achievements is in the fact that the Juilliard School of Music in New York appointed Paul at 26 as the youngest ever Chairman of the Organ Department.   Well, to paraphrase, the proof is in the playing, and always has been. = Here is what he played, and a bit about how:   For a high energy start: the Sinfonia from Bach Cantata 29, played at a = very settled tempo with total clarity. It did not put one on the edge of one's chair, but rather felt wonderfully comfortable and exciting all at once. Terrific, and a great way to put a recital audience on full alert!   My enthusiasm remains firm for the closed circuit color TV system that projects a clear and close up picture of the Organist hidden behind the Rueck Positif in the west gallery, onto a very large screen in the front = of the church, visible to all. I have brought inexperienced recital-goers to St. Ignatius whose conversion to our art has been aided by the ability to see as well as hear the making of the music. The equipment has been underwritten by the Mary Duke Biddle Foundation.   Next on the program, the great Reger Fantasie on "Wachet auf!" Paul played =   this entire program from memory, which gives him a tremendous freedom in performance. Freedom from worrying about page turns, or about the page at all. Of more importance, a quality of freedom in the playing and a great sense of line, and with a great unimpeded dramatic sweep. Paul's genius in =   registration is breathtaking to behold, both for its imaginative tonal use =   of this instrument, and for the ease with which he manipulated the systems =   available to him. While my ears were at full alert, my eyes were also = glued to the screen. At the great final entrance of the choral, I was totally dissolved, and I had a wee fantasy about the Organ pipes winking through = the Swell shutters, and saying "Thanks. We love what you do to us!" This Organ =   may be English, but it is nonetheless human!   For a little sorbet, cleansing the palate, Paul played "Ich ruf zu dir" = from the Orgelbuechlein. The cantus was played on a rather high, piping sound, almost like 4' and 2'. I should have asked. It was lovely and it worked.   Paul closed his program with another Reger Fantasy, that on "Hallelujah! Gott zu loben," possibly more dramatic and intricate even then "Wachet = auf." In any case, everything said above concerning "Wachet auf" applies here as =   well. Every intricacy was made clear. At the end, the audience cheered and =   rose to its feet. I joined a number of people taking advantage of the wood =   floor to attempt a sort of Albert Hall stamp. Were not another concert following right on this one soon to take place, I expect we would have = been favored with at least one encore.   Paul will play at St. Ignatius another time this summer, during the conference of the Lutheran Church Musicians. That recital will be on July 12th, and I don't know the time. I plan to crash the party, and I will = pass on more information as I have it. The church is big enough that I don't think anyone will be stopping people at the door if they are not part of = the conference. Hearing Paul in this church is something very special. I hope some of you might be able to get back for the 12th of July. *AFKAT stands for Apparatus Formerly Known As a Toaster. Attributed to Rodney Myrvaagnes.   Cheers,   Malcolm Wechsler www.mander-organs.com                        
(back) Subject: Re: Questions I have about Carillons From: "Vern Jones" <soundres@foothill.net> Date: Sun, 8 May 2005 22:54:23 -0700   Hello Channing,   The closest to an Organ console that I know of is the Carillon in the = Albriton Tower at Texas A & M, It is now a MIDI Carillon with record and = playback capabilities. It has 49 bells with Hard and Soft strikers and = is played from a 2 manual keyboard, or MIDI File.   I built the MIDI equipment for the Carillon.   Vern, Sound Research ----- Original Message -----=20 From: Channing Ashbaugh=20 To: PipeChat=20 Sent: Sunday, May 08, 2005 6:01 PM Subject: Questions I have about Carillons     Hello everyone=20 =20 =20 =20 I have some questions about carillons my questions are: =20 1. has anyone ever seen a carillon Keyboard that looks like an organ = console? 2. Is there anyone that works with carillons where the Keyboard looks = like an organ console? 3. Does anyone like carillon music? 4. Does anyone know any females that play a Symphonic carillon = Keyboard and if show what is their names and do they play any other = instruments? 5. Does anyone have any John Klein Carillon music that they have made = in to mp3s from the record albums? 6. Does anyone have any carillon music mp3s? =20 If you know the answers please e-mail me at channing28270@yahoo.com or = channinga@carolina.rr.com =20 channing      
(back) Subject: Re: Questions I have about Carillons From: "Jarle Fagerheim" <jarle_fagerheim@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Mon, 09 May 2005 08:05:50 +0200   The carillon of Our Saviours Church (V=E5r frelsers kirke) in Haugesund, western Norway, can be played from the Verschueren organ console. A friend of mine couldn't find the proper switch to turn on the organ, and ended up playing a little melody on the bells instead ;).   -- Beste helsing / Best wishes / Beste Gr=FC=DFe / Bestu kvedjur   Jarle Fagerheim   jarle_fagerheim@yahoo.co.uk www: http://jarle.moo.no