PipeChat Digest #5322 - Monday, May 9, 2005
 
Re: Questions I have about Carillons
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
recital news
  by "Scott A Montgomery" <montre1978@yahoo.com>
AFKAT
  by "Merry Foxworth" <m.foxworth@verizon.net>
Re: Questions I have about Carillons
  by "Andy Lawrence" <lawrenceandy@gmail.com>
Re: Questions I have about Carillons
  by <Myosotis51@aol.com>
Re: Questions I have about Carillons
  by <dudelk@aol.com>
PIPORG
  by "Merry Foxworth" <m.foxworth@verizon.net>
UV Protection-other pictures of nave
  by "Daniel Hancock" <dhancock@brpae.com>
Re: Black Baptist Churches
  by "Desiree'" <nicemusica@yahoo.com>
Introducing the German "Blunder-egg"
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Who is the oldest surviving organ company?
  by "nelson denton" <ndenton@cogeco.ca>
Re: UV Protection-other pictures of nave
  by <tlevans95@charter.net>
Re: UV Protection-other pictures of nave
  by "Jan Nijhuis" <nijhuis.jan@gmail.com>
Re: UV Protection-other pictures of nave
  by "N. Russotto" <ravenrockdesigns@gmail.com>
RE: Questions I have about Carillons
  by "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
RE: Questions I have about Carillons
  by "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
Re: Questions I have About Pipe organs
  by "N. Russotto" <ravenrockdesigns@gmail.com>
Re: Questions I have about Carillons
  by "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net>
RE: Questions I have about Carillons
  by "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
Re: Questions I have about Carillons
  by "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
Kuh-RILL-yin vs. "Bellwhacker"
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Questions I have about Carillons From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Mon, 9 May 2005 06:30:44 -0700 (PDT)   Hello,   As most carillons originate in the UK (this is TRUE - Taylor & Co., who supply even the Low Countries, and do many restorations around the world) I expect everyone should think that I know something about them!   Wrong!   However, I do go to Holland and hear them often, and I have "had a go" with one. They're quite difficult to play; requiring more physical effort for the bigger bells.   Very few Carillons ever had electric action, but a few did, and one or two are hooked up to pipe-organ consoles.   The reason for this is musical.   Large bells have a long sustain period, but little bells do not; thus requiring re-iteration for sustained notes. Also, small bells are less powerful, and need to be "stroked" differently from the heavier bells. No electric action has ever really been successful musically, for this reason.   As regards women carilloneurs (are there and LADY carilloneurs?), I have found a few on the web:-   Marilyn Anderson (Stanford Memorial Carilon)   Marilyn Anderson was carillonneur from 1971 to 1973, and again from 1991 to 1992. She is an Iowa State University graduate (B.S. 1972, M.S. 1974) and served as audience education specialist with the Iowa State Center from 1980 to 1984. She has given carillon instruction to many individuals both during her term as carillonneur and during the carillon renovation.   also (same place)   Tin-Shi Tam   Beginning her tenure as university carillonneur in 1994, Dr. Tam is currently a member of the faculty in the Department of Music.   University of Sydney War Memorial Carillon May 1992, - Jill Forrest was appointed   --------------------   I hope this helps a little.   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK       ----- Channing Ashbaugh <channinga@carolina.rr.com> wrote: > > I have some questions about carillons ......     __________________________________ Yahoo! Mail Mobile Take Yahoo! Mail with you! Check email on your mobile phone. http://mobile.yahoo.com/learn/mail  
(back) Subject: recital news From: "Scott A Montgomery" <montre1978@yahoo.com> Date: Mon, 9 May 2005 06:43:08 -0700 (PDT)   If anyone is interested, I am performing a recital next Monday, May 16th, = 2005. Location: Chapel of St John the Divine Corner of Wright and Armory Urbana Illinois Time: 7:30 Program:                                                                           Scott Montgomery, organ         Chapel of St. John the Divine   Monday, May 16, 2005   7:30 pm   ---------------------------------       Marchand- Dialogue         Franck- Chorale No. 2 in B minor         Bach- Prelude and Fugue in C Major, BWV 547         intermission         Messiaen- L=92Ascension   I. Majest=E9 du Christ demandant sa gloire =E0 son P=E8re   II. All=E9luias sereins d=92une =E2me qui desire le ciel   III. Transports de joie d=92une =E2me devant la gloire du Christ qui est = la sienne   IV. Pri=E8re de Christ montant vers son P=E8re       Dupre- Prelude and Fugue in G minor, Op. 7         Scott Montgomery 619 W Church St Champaign, IL 61820 217-390-0158 www.ScottMontgomeryMusic.net  
(back) Subject: AFKAT From: "Merry Foxworth" <m.foxworth@verizon.net> Date: Mon, 09 May 2005 09:57:08 -0400   *AFKAT stands for Apparatus Formerly Known As a Toaster. Attributed to =   Rodney Myrvaagnes. For the A you could also say appliance! LOL   =B4=A8=A8)) -:=A6:- =B8.=B7=B4 .=B7=B4=A8=A8)) ((=B8=B8.=B7=B4 ..=B7=B4 -:=A6:-=20   An excerpt from Robert Giddings "Musical Quotes and Anecdotes", published in Longman Pocket Companions:=20 "There let the pealing organ blow,=20 To the full-voiced choir below,=20 In service high, and anthems clear,=20 As may with sweetness, through mine ear,=20 Dissolve me into ecstasies,=20 And bring all Heav'n before mine eyes".=20 John Milton - Il Penseroso (1632).=20   Merry Foxworth Open Door Realty=20 Boston, MA 02131 =20 617 469-4888 x207 877 865-1703 toll free http://www.opendoorrlty.com/  
(back) Subject: Re: Questions I have about Carillons From: "Andy Lawrence" <lawrenceandy@gmail.com> Date: Mon, 9 May 2005 07:24:35 -0700   >=20 > Here in Wellington NZ we have the 3rd-biggest carillon in the world. It's= a > magnificent sound. > Ross >=20 This makes me curious. I've never thought of carillons in a "size" sense, like organs. I thought 4 octaves of bells was the general standard, with fewer bells where space, budget, and structure are limitations. What is the 3rd biggest (or biggest, for that matter) carillon like? It is more than 4 octaves? Does it have more than one "rank"?   Andy  
(back) Subject: Re: Questions I have about Carillons From: <Myosotis51@aol.com> Date: Mon, 9 May 2005 10:49:59 EDT   The Carillon at First Presbyterian in Southampton, NY is controlled by a stop on the Austin organ. When I subbed there, the organist graciously red-flagged this stop so I would accidentally serenade Main Street. <g>   Victoria    
(back) Subject: Re: Questions I have about Carillons From: <dudelk@aol.com> Date: Mon, 09 May 2005 11:06:12 -0400   Take a look at: http://www.cathedral.org/cathedral/music/bells.shtml I believe the carillon at the Crystal Cathedral can be played from one of = the organ consoles. As to women carillonneurs, have a look at www.longwoodgardens.org and take = a look at the carillon page there. Enjoy! -----Original Message----- From: Andy Lawrence <lawrenceandy@gmail.com> To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Mon, 9 May 2005 07:24:35 -0700 Subject: Re: Questions I have about Carillons     > > Here in Wellington NZ we have the 3rd-biggest carillon in the world. = It's a > magnificent sound. > Ross > This makes me curious. I've never thought of carillons in a "size" sense, like organs. I thought 4 octaves of bells was the general standard, with fewer bells where space, budget, and structure are limitations. What is the 3rd biggest (or biggest, for that matter) carillon like? It is more than 4 octaves? Does it have more than one "rank"?   Andy   ****************************************************************** "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org>  
(back) Subject: PIPORG From: "Merry Foxworth" <m.foxworth@verizon.net> Date: Mon, 09 May 2005 12:38:21 -0400   Could someone kindly send me the link to sign up for the PIPORG list!? = THanks very much. Merry   =B4=A8=A8)) -:=A6:- =B8.=B7=B4 .=B7=B4=A8=A8)) ((=B8=B8.=B7=B4 ..=B7=B4 -:=A6:-=20  
(back) Subject: UV Protection-other pictures of nave From: "Daniel Hancock" <dhancock@brpae.com> Date: Mon, 9 May 2005 12:25:05 -0500   One of my churches has a west-facing, large, contemporary=20 (1958) stained-glass window that is the full height and=20 width of the center area of the organ loft. (The four=20 divisions of the organ are in chambers to the left and right=20 of the window.)   (You can see photos of the window at=20 http://www.137.com/faith/page2.html)   Incidentally, Charlie, what is shown in the middle of the right seating section in the nave? A small console? A sound-system "booth?" A keyboard?   Daniel Hancock  
(back) Subject: Re: Black Baptist Churches From: "Desiree'" <nicemusica@yahoo.com> Date: Mon, 9 May 2005 10:36:34 -0700 (PDT)   Wicks has done a new Digital/pipe for Tabernacle Missionary Baptist in = Detroit. They are (somewhat) the sister church to Hartford Memorial = Baptist. The latter of the two houses a IV/96 Petty Madden thats VERY top = heavy. When I did a recital there, I only needed the swell Mixture most of = the time, never employing the great mixture. There are also 3 organists = there. the Principal very talented (and charming) JoAnn Rickerds-Clark = (DMA Michigan). Another gentleman just completed is BMA at Michigan. He = and his wife are lovers of the Universities fall organ fest and love to = talk about Messien. There are quite a new organs that seem to be going in. It would be lovely = to see a Black church with a new tracker suited for use in a worship = space. There are newer installations in other cities/towns as well. From Desiree' (Who likes Trackers, EP's, some digitals)       __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around http://mail.yahoo.com
(back) Subject: Introducing the German "Blunder-egg" From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Mon, 9 May 2005 11:00:06 -0700 (PDT)   Hello,   I'm really struggling with Hungarian.....the language that is, not a real person.   The machine translation from Hungarian to German, and then German to English has created some fascinating new descriptions of things, such as "game table" for "console."   However, I am at a complete loss to understand what a "blunder egg" might be!!   Any ideas anyone?   In the meantime, I can tell everyone that Hungary has the third largest organ in mainland Europe (5th largest by number of pipes if the UK is included), with an impressive 5-manuals and about 9,500 pipes. This is at Szeged Dom.   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK           Discover Yahoo! Find restaurants, movies, travel and more fun for the weekend. Check it = out! http://discover.yahoo.com/weekend.html    
(back) Subject: Who is the oldest surviving organ company? From: "nelson denton" <ndenton@cogeco.ca> Date: Tue, 10 May 2005 02:02:32 -0400   Ok the subject says it all.     Which company is the oldest surviving company in each part of the world.   Just curious.   N.  
(back) Subject: Re: UV Protection-other pictures of nave From: <tlevans95@charter.net> Date: Mon, 9 May 2005 14:05:49 -0400   At my home congregation the put up storm windows on the outside to protect = the windows. I don't think the windows are original to the 1856 building = but are fairly old. I'm sure the storm windows could be treated, and then = you dont' have to worry about it going directly on the stained glass.   Travis > > From: "Daniel Hancock" <dhancock@brpae.com> > Date: 2005/05/09 Mon PM 01:25:05 EDT > To: <pipechat@pipechat.org> > Subject: UV Protection-other pictures of nave > > One of my churches has a west-facing, large, contemporary > (1958) stained-glass window that is the full height and > width of the center area of the organ loft. (The four > divisions of the organ are in chambers to the left and right > of the window.) > > (You can see photos of the window at > http://www.137.com/faith/page2.html) > > Incidentally, Charlie, what is shown in the middle of the right seating > section in the nave? A small console? A sound-system "booth?" A > keyboard? > > Daniel Hancock > > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> > >    
(back) Subject: Re: UV Protection-other pictures of nave From: "Jan Nijhuis" <nijhuis.jan@gmail.com> Date: Mon, 9 May 2005 12:04:53 -0700   From the Amoskeag Orthodox Preb. Church website: (http://www.amoskeagchurch.org/)   " In 1973 Plexiglas was installed to protect the windows from vandalism. The windows at that time were appraised at $47,550. In 1980 this was replaced by the present Lexan. This year also saw the first use of the building by outside groups. In 1981 the "Fellowship Hall" was renovated and dedicated. In 1983 the Wurlitzer theater organ, which had been donated in 1947, was replaced by a Steer & Turner mechanical action pipe organ (1878). In 1984 the congregation celebrated its centennial."   Their windows date from 1884, 1887 and 1891.   A glazier should be able to provide what is needed for both UV protection and protection against vandalism.   On 5/9/05, Daniel Hancock <dhancock@brpae.com> wrote: > One of my churches has a west-facing, large, contemporary > (1958) stained-glass window that is the full height and > width of the center area of the organ loft. (The four > divisions of the organ are in chambers to the left and right > of the window.) >=20 > (You can see photos of the window at > http://www.137.com/faith/page2.html) >=20 > Incidentally, Charlie, what is shown in the middle of the right seating > section in the nave? A small console? A sound-system "booth?" A > keyboard? >=20 > Daniel Hancock   --=20 Jan Nijhuis nijhuis.jan@gmail.com  
(back) Subject: Re: UV Protection-other pictures of nave From: "N. Russotto" <ravenrockdesigns@gmail.com> Date: Mon, 9 May 2005 15:10:54 -0400   That a Casavant, Daniel? NFR   On 5/9/05, Jan Nijhuis <nijhuis.jan@gmail.com> wrote:=20 >=20 > From the Amoskeag Orthodox Preb. Church website: > (http://www.amoskeagchurch.org/) >=20 > " In 1973 Plexiglas was installed to protect the windows from > vandalism. The windows at that time were appraised at $47,550. In 1980 > this was replaced by the present Lexan. This year also saw the first > use of the building by outside groups. In 1981 the "Fellowship Hall" > was renovated and dedicated. In 1983 the Wurlitzer theater organ, > which had been donated in 1947, was replaced by a Steer & Turner > mechanical action pipe organ (1878). In 1984 the congregation > celebrated its centennial." >=20 > Their windows date from 1884, 1887 and 1891. >=20 > A glazier should be able to provide what is needed for both UV > protection and protection against vandalism. >=20 > On 5/9/05, Daniel Hancock <dhancock@brpae.com> wrote: > > One of my churches has a west-facing, large, contemporary > > (1958) stained-glass window that is the full height and > > width of the center area of the organ loft. (The four > > divisions of the organ are in chambers to the left and right > > of the window.) > > > > (You can see photos of the window at > > http://www.137.com/faith/page2.html) > > > > Incidentally, Charlie, what is shown in the middle of the right seating > > section in the nave? A small console? A sound-system "booth?" A > > keyboard? > > > > Daniel Hancock >=20 > -- > Jan Nijhuis > nijhuis.jan@gmail.com >=20 > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> >=20 >=20     --=20 Nicholas F. Russotto Somers, Connecticut Organist, Holy Cross PNCC Enfield, Connecticut Moderator/Owner: Monarch of Music=20 http://launch.groups.yahoo.com/group/monarch_of_music/  
(back) Subject: RE: Questions I have about Carillons From: "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Tue, 10 May 2005 08:23:07 +1200   >As regards women carilloneurs (are there and LADY carilloneurs?), I have found a few on the web:-   Here in NZm, the National Carillonist is Tim Hurd. He's also an organbuilder, chorister at Wellington Cathedral etcetcetc. Hailing from = the USA, he did degrees in both music and structural engineering and is, I believe, still owner of a company in the USA that repairs and restores carillons and peals. He told me that carillonists prefer that term these days, and that the term carillonneur is no longer liked.   Tim likes saying to people he'll bring his partner Sydney along to a function and watching their faces. When they arrive together, the people discover Sydney is a most attractive tall and slim long-haired lassie who = is Tim's wife.   Tim supervised the rebuilding, restoration, re-voicing and completion = (with the very deepest four bells) of our National Carillon in Wellington. He is = a very very accomplished man of multiple talents.   Ross    
(back) Subject: RE: Questions I have about Carillons From: "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Tue, 10 May 2005 08:35:24 +1200     >This makes me curious. I've never thought of carillons in a "size" sense, like organs. I thought 4 octaves of bells was the general standard, with fewer bells where space, budget, and structure are limitations. What is the 3rd biggest (or biggest, for that matter) carillon like? It is more than 4 octaves? Does it have more than one "rank"?   Only one "rank of bells", yes. Compass is not the only factor in size, but pitch as well. So, often carillons are compared by weight. A 25bell = carillon where the bottom bell weighs two tons would, for example, be considerably smaller than another of 25 bells where the bottom bell weighed 12 tons.   Compass can be as little as one octave, as much as 61 or even more.   If I remember correctly, the heaviest carillons in the world are in a = tower in Chicago and in Riverside Church with Wellington next and people = certainly visit NZ for the specific purpose of hearing (and often playing) our beastie. Ours is a National War Memorial and was built pre-WWII. Often = said to be the only free-standing art deco tower in the world, it was exceptionally well built and should last for a very long time. It was founded by Gillett & Johnston of England.   One interesting thing is that the very biggest bells are not made by bell-founders, but by those who make ships' propellors. For only the incredibly-rare occasion of a very big bell (perhaps 10 or 12ft or so across) being made, it isn't worth the effort for bell-founders, so = they'll give the job to an engineering that has the capacity and equipment on-hand as it were.   If you're interested in the details of our bells here, including compass, weight of bottom bell, etc., I'll dig them out for you as I have all the details here somewhere.   Ross    
(back) Subject: Re: Questions I have About Pipe organs From: "N. Russotto" <ravenrockdesigns@gmail.com> Date: Mon, 9 May 2005 17:00:10 -0400   Channing, A quick google search and follow up determines that Sardis Presbyterian has= =20 some sort of organ. The organists email address is : *sdeboer@sardis.org*<sdeboer@sardis.org>. You can probably contact her for information.   On 5/8/05, David Scribner <david@blackiris.com> wrote:=20 >=20 > At 10:04 PM -0400 5/8/05, AGODRDANB@aol.com wrote: > > > >I grew up in Evanston Il, and the Barnes were neighbors. As > >i recall Mr Barnes had a four manual Austin in his home. >=20 > Dr. Dan >=20 > William Harrison Barnes did have a 4 manual organ in his home that > was controlled by a redone Austin console. The console was > originally a three manual that was enlarged to 4 manuals. The organ > however was not an Austin. The organ was, and i quote directly from > the Barnes book "Mr Gruenstein, the editor of The Diapason described > it as a "thoroughbred residence organ of mongrel antecedents.'" > Basically it was an organ that had been "altered, changed, rebuilt > and experimented with on many occasions" - again a direct quote from > the book. >=20 > The book "The Contemporary American Organ" is still a good basic > reference book that does describe the workings of a pipe organ. But > I think many of us would not agree with your statement that he was > "quite a scholar and organist". >=20 > David >=20 > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> >=20 >=20     --=20 Nicholas F. Russotto Somers, Connecticut Organist, Holy Cross PNCC Enfield, Connecticut Moderator/Owner: Monarch of Music=20 http://launch.groups.yahoo.com/group/monarch_of_music/  
(back) Subject: Re: Questions I have about Carillons From: "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net> Date: Mon, 9 May 2005 17:17:08 -0400   Dear Ross and List,   You say: "He told me that carillonists prefer that term these > days, and that the term carillonneur is no longer liked."   I ask: Does this imply that with the new term, carillonist, the double L = is pronounced as in English, rather than the Y sound of the French: Carilloneur - like Carry-on-err?   I hope the similarities between an Organ and a Carillon will qualify this as, at least, somewhat on topic.   America needs a National Carilloneur, but I guess we lack a national Carillon! Gosh, the National Cathedral in D. C. has bells but I am not = sure if there is actually a Carillon. Canada, of course, has a national Carilloneur at the Houses of Parliament in Ottawa.   The city where my church lives, Stamford, CT, has a fine Carillon, given = by the grateful Swiss of the Nestle company to the First Presbyterian Church. =   In exile, many if not all in the company attended church there during the war. As some will know, this is a great church in the shape of a fish. The =   rather striking modern Carillon tower, built some years after the church itself, is a landmark, as, for that matter, is the church. For a picture = of this bell tower, see:   http://cs-www.cs.yale.edu/homes/douglas-craig/bells/USA/stamford.html   In the nearby town of New Canaan, at St. Mark's Episcopal Church, there is =   yet another Carillon, in a free-standing tower built when this handsome, modern church was built. We are a bunch of ding dongs around here, it = would seem. These are wonderful instruments, and many come to sit on the grass = and listen to summertime concerts. Here is a place to see a picture of St. Mark's   http://www.stmarksnewcanaan.org/welcome/welcome_frame.htm   Adding topicality, the "Fish Church" has a large Organ by our friend, = Pieter Visser. St. Mark's, New Canaan has a large Austin Organ.   Cheers,   Malcolm Wechsler www.mander-organs.com - mere steps away from the Whitechapel Bell = Foundry.   ----- Original Message ----- From: "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> To: "'PipeChat'" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Monday, May 09, 2005 4:23 PM Subject: RE: Questions I have about Carillons     > >As regards women carilloneurs (are there and LADY > carilloneurs?), I have found a few on the web:- > > Here in NZm, the National Carillonist is Tim Hurd. He's also an > organbuilder, chorister at Wellington Cathedral etcetcetc. Hailing from > the > USA, he did degrees in both music and structural engineering and is, I > believe, still owner of a company in the USA that repairs and restores > carillons and peals. He told me that carillonists prefer that term these > days, and that the term carillonneur is no longer liked. > > Tim likes saying to people he'll bring his partner Sydney along to a > function and watching their faces. When they arrive together, the people > discover Sydney is a most attractive tall and slim long-haired lassie = who > is > Tim's wife. > > Tim supervised the rebuilding, restoration, re-voicing and completion > (with > the very deepest four bells) of our National Carillon in Wellington. He = is > a > very very accomplished man of multiple talents. > > Ross >      
(back) Subject: RE: Questions I have about Carillons From: "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Tue, 10 May 2005 09:32:52 +1200   >You say: "He told me that carillonists prefer that term these > days, and that the term carillonneur is no longer liked." >I ask: Does this imply that with the new term, carillonist, the double L = is   pronounced as in English, rather than the Y sound of the French: Carilloneur - like Carry-on-err?   Here, the pronunciation of these two words is, roughly, carillonneur =3D ki-ril-yin-ur carillonist =3D ki-ril-yin-ist   The great and wonderful machine is always pronounced here as - carillon =3D ki-ril-yin.   To my knowledge, the "carry-on" way has never been used here.   Ross    
(back) Subject: Re: Questions I have about Carillons From: "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> Date: Mon, 9 May 2005 17:33:57 -0400   How is that that the a of the first syllable becomes an i? Is this how New Zealanders speak?   Randy Runyon   On May 9, 2005, at 5:32 PM, TheShieling wrote:   >> > > Here, the pronunciation of these two words is, roughly, > carillonneur =3D ki-ril-yin-ur > carillonist =3D ki-ril-yin-ist > > The great and wonderful machine is always pronounced here as - > carillon =3D ki-ril-yin. > > To my knowledge, the "carry-on" way has never been used here. > > Ross >  
(back) Subject: Kuh-RILL-yin vs. "Bellwhacker" From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Mon, 9 May 2005 17:39:55 EDT   A tradition of mispronunciation does not justify its perpetuation.   "Karri-luh-NOOR" is an Anglicized mispronunciation, but at least it doesn't add a stray vowel and completely, diphthongically screw up the = word the way "Kuh-RILL-yin" does.