PipeChat Digest #5323 - Monday, May 9, 2005
 
Re: Questions I have about Carillons
  by <dudelk@aol.com>
Out of Office AutoReply: PipeChat Digest #5322 - 05/09/05
  by "Higgins, Floyd (GSP)" <fhiggins@gspinc.com>
UV Protection-other pictures of nave
  by "Daniel Hancock" <dhancock@brpae.com>
the middle of the right seating section in the nave
  by "Charlie Lester" <crl@137.com>
RE: Kuh-RILL-yin vs. "Bellwhacker"
  by "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
RE: Questions I have about Carillons
  by "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
Re: Oldest companies
  by "OUSCDB" <ouscdb@earthlink.net>
Re: Oldest companies
  by <OrganMD@aol.com>
Re: Oldest companies
  by "Jim McFarland" <mcfarland6@juno.com>
Re: Who is the oldest surviving organ company?
  by <arno.schuh@in-trier.de>
Re: UV Protection-other pictures of nave
  by "N. Russotto" <ravenrockdesigns@gmail.com>
Re: Pipe Organs in Charlotte, NC
  by <RMB10@aol.com>
Re: Questions I have about Carillons
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: Questions I have about Carillons
  by "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
Re: Questions I have about the French
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
unique carillon installations
  by "Tim Bovard" <tmbovard@earthlink.net>
Re: Questions I have about Carillons
  by "robertelms" <robertelms@westnet.com.au>
Re: Questions I have about the French
  by "N. Russotto" <ravenrockdesigns@gmail.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Questions I have about Carillons From: <dudelk@aol.com> Date: Mon, 09 May 2005 17:46:19 -0400   There are actually three carillons in Washington -- the National = Cathedral, the Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate = Conception, and the Netherlands Carillon just across the river by the Iwo = Jima Memorial in Arlington. I'm not sure about the fate of the = Glockenspiel at the National Zoo. I taught myself to play it when I worked = at the zoo in the early 80s but I think it has been dismantled, which is = too bad. There are also bells at the Taft Memorial on the Capitol grounds. = Others more knowledgeable can weigh in on that. I think Ed Nassor plays at = both the cathedral and the Netherlands Carillon. The cathedral has both a = carillon and a peal. There's also a peal in the Old Post Office building = on Pennsylvania Ave. between the White House and the Capitol. From my = balcony I can sometimes hear the bells of Foundry Methodist, too. A lovely = sound in the Dupont Circle neighborhood. Dudelsvater -----Original Message----- From: Malcolm Wechsler <manderusa@earthlink.net> To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Mon, 9 May 2005 17:17:08 -0400 Subject: Re: Questions I have about Carillons     Dear Ross and List, You say: "He told me that carillonists prefer that term these > days, and that the term carillonneur is no longer liked." I ask: Does this imply that with the new term, carillonist, the double L = is pronounced as in English, rather than the Y sound of the French: = Carilloneur - like Carry-on-err? I hope the similarities between an Organ and a Carillon will qualify this = as, at least, somewhat on topic. America needs a National Carilloneur, but I guess we lack a national = Carillon! Gosh, the National Cathedral in D. C. has bells but I am not = sure if there is actually a Carillon. Canada, of course, has a national = Carilloneur at the Houses of Parliament in Ottawa. The city where my church lives, Stamford, CT, has a fine Carillon, given = by the grateful Swiss of the Nestle company to the First Presbyterian = Church. In exile, many if not all in the company attended church there = during the war. As some will know, this is a great church in the shape of = a fish. The rather striking modern Carillon tower, built some years after = the church itself, is a landmark, as, for that matter, is the church. For = a picture of this bell tower, see: http://cs-www.cs.yale.edu/homes/douglas-craig/bells/USA/stamford.html In the nearby town of New Canaan, at St. Mark's Episcopal Church, there is = yet another Carillon, in a free-standing tower built when this handsome, = modern church was built. We are a bunch of ding dongs around here, it = would seem. These are wonderful instruments, and many come to sit on the = grass and listen to summertime concerts. Here is a place to see a picture = of St. Mark's http://www.stmarksnewcanaan.org/welcome/welcome_frame.htm Adding topicality, the "Fish Church" has a large Organ by our friend, = Pieter Visser. St. Mark's, New Canaan has a large Austin Organ. Cheers, Malcolm Wechsler www.mander-organs.com - mere steps away from the Whitechapel Bell Foundry. =   ----- Original Message ----- From: "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> To: "'PipeChat'" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Monday, May 09, 2005 4:23 PM Subject: RE: Questions I have about Carillons > >As regards women carilloneurs (are there and LADY > carilloneurs?), I have found a few on the web:- > > Here in NZm, the National Carillonist is Tim Hurd. He's also an > organbuilder, chorister at Wellington Cathedral etcetcetc. Hailing from = > the > USA, he did degrees in both music and structural engineering and is, I > believe, still owner of a company in the USA that repairs and restores > carillons and peals. He told me that carillonists prefer that term these =   > days, and that the term carillonneur is no longer liked. > > Tim likes saying to people he'll bring his partner Sydney along to a > function and watching their faces. When they arrive together, the people =   > discover Sydney is a most attractive tall and slim long-haired lassie = who > is > Tim's wife. > > Tim supervised the rebuilding, restoration, re-voicing and completion > = (with > the very deepest four bells) of our National Carillon in Wellington. He = is > a > very very accomplished man of multiple talents. > > Ross > ****************************************************************** "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org>  
(back) Subject: Out of Office AutoReply: PipeChat Digest #5322 - 05/09/05 From: "Higgins, Floyd (GSP)" <fhiggins@gspinc.com> Date: Mon, 9 May 2005 17:43:24 -0400   I am out of the office this afternoon May 9 and will not be checking my e-mail. I will respond to your message on May 10   Floyd Higgins   Floyd  
(back) Subject: UV Protection-other pictures of nave From: "Daniel Hancock" <dhancock@brpae.com> Date: Mon, 9 May 2005 16:59:11 -0500   I'm not sure. The original posting wasn't mine...I was just begging a question about one of the photographs of the nave. Jan Nijhuis will have to answer questions about the organ.   Daniel Hancock   From: "N. Russotto" <ravenrockdesigns@gmail.com> Date: Mon, 9 May 2005 15:10:54 -0400   That a Casavant, Daniel? NFR   On 5/9/05, Jan Nijhuis <nijhuis.jan@gmail.com> wrote:=20 >=20 > From the Amoskeag Orthodox Preb. Church website: > (http://www.amoskeagchurch.org/) >=20 > " In 1973 Plexiglas was installed to protect the windows from=20 > vandalism. The windows at that time were appraised at $47,550. In 1980   > this was replaced by the present Lexan. This year also saw the first=20 > use of the building by outside groups. In 1981 the "Fellowship Hall"=20 > was renovated and dedicated. In 1983 the Wurlitzer theater organ,=20 > which had been donated in 1947, was replaced by a Steer & Turner=20 > mechanical action pipe organ (1878). In 1984 the congregation=20 > celebrated its centennial." >=20 > Their windows date from 1884, 1887 and 1891. >=20 > A glazier should be able to provide what is needed for both UV=20 > protection and protection against vandalism. >=20 > On 5/9/05, Daniel Hancock <dhancock@brpae.com> wrote: > > One of my churches has a west-facing, large, contemporary > > (1958) stained-glass window that is the full height and width of the   > > center area of the organ loft. (The four divisions of the organ are=20 > > in chambers to the left and right of the window.) > > > > (You can see photos of the window at > > http://www.137.com/faith/page2.html) > > > > Incidentally, Charlie, what is shown in the middle of the right=20 > > seating section in the nave? A small console? A sound-system=20 > > "booth?" A keyboard? > > > > Daniel Hancock  
(back) Subject: the middle of the right seating section in the nave From: "Charlie Lester" <crl@137.com> Date: Mon, 09 May 2005 15:09:44 -0700   =3D-> Incidentally, Charlie, what is shown in the middle of the right seating section in the nave? A small console? A sound-system "booth?" A keyboard? <-=3D     That's the "choir loft." As you may have noted from the photos, the entire place has been slathered with acoustical tile -- all the soffit ceilings, including the "normal" choir loft area, the upper nave walls, and a long strip down the entire length of the nave ceiling.   When the choir sings from what would have been the "normal" loft down there (off to the south side of the chancel), it's like trying to sing in a vacuum chamber --- they can't hear one another, and of course their voices do not carry beyond that corner. So, in deference to the pastor's wish (per contemporary worship/liturgy trends) to have the choir "down front," they sit in that area of the nave.   There is a Rodgers "electronic keyboard" there but I hardly ever use it. It's icky. The church has a fairly nice baby grand that I have moved up into the chancel that I usually use for accompanying --- instead, since, to really complicate the answer, I have been having the choir process up into the chancel when they sing rather than sing from the area where they sit -- the reason being, again, acoustics.   Plans are afoot to renovate the sanctuary and remove all the acoustic tiles along with glazing the brick walls; all that's holding up the work is, as usual, funding.   An interesting footnote -- the organ in this church was originally slated to be a good-sized chancel instrument, and the choir loft was to be where what would in a cruciform-shaped church would be the right arm off the ambulatory. (However there is neither ambulatory nor arms...)   However, I have been told from several "oldtimers" that the organist at the time INSISTED on a west gallery location for the organ, with the choir seated up there as well, to the direct opposition of the architect who had stipulated chancel locations for both. What was originally to be the main choir loft was instead used for more congregational seating.   To accommodate this whim, the size of the organ was cut down by about half; then, when Casavant arrived on the site and began installation, a Fire Marshall happened to come by for an inspection and wrote a citation because there was only one stairway to the loft - against the Fire Code. The only way to install a second (rather narrower) stairway was to take floor space from the Great/Pedal chamber --- so several more stops had to be omitted.   The one really fortunate thing in all this -- in my opinion -- is that the contract for the organ was signed mere months before Larry Phelps came to Casavant, so the organ is a much more romantically inclined instrument by Stephen Stoot. I shudder to think what it would be if they had signed the contract a year later....... quack quack, screech, screech.......!   ~ C    
(back) Subject: RE: Kuh-RILL-yin vs. "Bellwhacker" From: "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Tue, 10 May 2005 10:15:19 +1200   > A tradition of mispronunciation does not justify its perpetuation.   Nor does a tradition of misspelling English words in the USA (theatre, metre, labour, e.g.) justify its perpetuation. :-) :-)   > "Karri-luh-NOOR" is an Anglicized mispronunciation, but at least it doesn't add a stray vowel and completely, diphthongically screw up the = word the way "Kuh-RILL-yin" does.   No, ours does not screw it up at all. In French, the double 'l' is pronounced as "y" so Engl. pronunciation is no "worse" than anyone else's. =     Trying to get -on-topic, just think of the various ways "organ" is spelt = in English, Italian, Spanish, French, German, Dutch etc. There are always differences in pronunciation from one place to another even in what is the same language, and they don't bother me very much. The meaning of the word is pretty clear. When it isn't, that's when we need to worry, as I see it.   Ross    
(back) Subject: RE: Questions I have about Carillons From: "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Tue, 10 May 2005 10:22:41 +1200   >How is that that the a of the first syllable becomes an i? Is this how New Zealanders speak?   I was trying (obviously not very well) that it is the 2nd syllable of "carillon" is stressed here. The first is a sort-of-indeterminate vowel sound, as is very common in English. Think, for example, of Edward (pronounced "Ed-wid") or Robert ("rob-it") = or mountain ("moun-tin"). Or, when we pronounce "fish and chips" as "fish-n-chips".   Even the word "pronounce" is not usually said that way in ordinary speech, with the first syllable as "proh" but rather almost "pri-nounce" with the stress on the second syllable.   English does this throughout the world and it is one of the ways of = spotting non-native-English-speakers that they don't do it well, or at all, or in ways the rest of use are not used to.   Ross    
(back) Subject: Re: Oldest companies From: "OUSCDB" <ouscdb@earthlink.net> Date: Mon, 9 May 2005 15:52:42 -0700   Nelson asked about old organs (builders that is)   In US I assume Odell is oldest by far having been in operation since1859 (and with earlier instruments attributed to the brothers while working for Ferris & Stuart   In Canada - obviously - Casavant, established in 1879 - not counting the continuity from Joseph Sr. who began somewhere around 1830.   Don't know off hand of anyone to give either firm much competition.     George Nelson      
(back) Subject: Re: Oldest companies From: <OrganMD@aol.com> Date: Mon, 9 May 2005 19:01:36 EDT   Other old US firms would be Austin, Holtkamp, and Schantz. Bill  
(back) Subject: Re: Oldest companies From: "Jim McFarland" <mcfarland6@juno.com> Date: Mon, 9 May 2005 19:06:48 -0400         Bill:   Austin went out of business twice, the first time in 1930. This makes them a grey area, because things never totally shut down either time, at least not for long. By the way, we have all of the original Austin mandrels sold at the 1930 sale.   Jim   On Mon, 9 May 2005 19:01:36 EDT OrganMD@aol.com writes: Other old US firms would be Austin, Holtkamp, and Schantz.   Bill
(back) Subject: Re: Who is the oldest surviving organ company? From: <arno.schuh@in-trier.de> Date: Tue, 10 May 2005 01:14:10 +0200   Hi, as mentioned to John Foss request for the oldest organbuilder still in the = same hand: http://www.jehmlich-orgelbau.de/englisch/frame-eng.htm   And afaIk. you may count Walcker founded in 1780, too.   http://www.walckerorgel.de/ Yours sincerely   Arno    
(back) Subject: Re: UV Protection-other pictures of nave From: "N. Russotto" <ravenrockdesigns@gmail.com> Date: Mon, 9 May 2005 19:22:01 -0400   No. . . I was referring to the link taht you posted. NFR   On 5/9/05, Daniel Hancock <dhancock@brpae.com> wrote:=20 >=20 > I'm not sure. The original posting wasn't mine...I was just begging a > question about one of the photographs of the nave. Jan Nijhuis will > have to answer questions about the organ. >=20 > Daniel Hancock >=20 > From: "N. Russotto" <ravenrockdesigns@gmail.com> > Date: Mon, 9 May 2005 15:10:54 -0400 >=20 > That a Casavant, Daniel? > NFR >=20 > On 5/9/05, Jan Nijhuis <nijhuis.jan@gmail.com> wrote: > > > > From the Amoskeag Orthodox Preb. Church website: > > (http://www.amoskeagchurch.org/) > > > > " In 1973 Plexiglas was installed to protect the windows from > > vandalism. The windows at that time were appraised at $47,550. In 1980 >=20 > > this was replaced by the present Lexan. This year also saw the first > > use of the building by outside groups. In 1981 the "Fellowship Hall" > > was renovated and dedicated. In 1983 the Wurlitzer theater organ, > > which had been donated in 1947, was replaced by a Steer & Turner > > mechanical action pipe organ (1878). In 1984 the congregation > > celebrated its centennial." > > > > Their windows date from 1884, 1887 and 1891. > > > > A glazier should be able to provide what is needed for both UV > > protection and protection against vandalism. > > > > On 5/9/05, Daniel Hancock <dhancock@brpae.com> wrote: > > > One of my churches has a west-facing, large, contemporary > > > (1958) stained-glass window that is the full height and width of the >=20 > > > center area of the organ loft. (The four divisions of the organ are > > > in chambers to the left and right of the window.) > > > > > > (You can see photos of the window at > > > http://www.137.com/faith/page2.html) > > > > > > Incidentally, Charlie, what is shown in the middle of the right > > > seating section in the nave? A small console? A sound-system > > > "booth?" A keyboard? > > > > > > Daniel Hancock >=20 > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> >=20 >=20     --=20 Nicholas F. Russotto Somers, Connecticut Organist, Holy Cross PNCC Enfield, Connecticut Moderator/Owner: Monarch of Music=20 http://launch.groups.yahoo.com/group/monarch_of_music/  
(back) Subject: Re: Pipe Organs in Charlotte, NC From: <RMB10@aol.com> Date: Mon, 9 May 2005 19:58:36 EDT   There are plenty of organs in Charlotte, NC. We have an active AGO = chapter which sponsors monthly activities as well as a weekly concert series = during the summer (June 5- August 28). These concerts feature most of the pipe = organs around the Charlotte area. Charlotte is most famous for the 205 rank Moller organ of Calvary Church, =   but Charlotte also is home to several large Aeolian-Skinner organs, as = well as some nice Casavants, as well as many Mollers, Zimmers, a couple of Wicks, = a Brunzema, some Austins, Schantzes, as well as some instruments by local = builders such as the Knowlton organ I play, and in the outlying areas, there are = some other organ treasures to behold.   Check out the Charlotte AGO Chapter's website at www.charlotteago.org to = find out what is happening.   Monty Bennett  
(back) Subject: Re: Questions I have about Carillons From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Mon, 9 May 2005 17:02:38 -0700 (PDT)   Hello,   I thought Washington DC cathedral had a new carillon installed?   I recall seeing something about it on a UK carillon maker's web-site.   Better keep this on topic.....what is that 10 rank Mixture at Washington?   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK     --- Malcolm Wechsler <manderusa@earthlink.net> wrote: > America needs a National Carilloneur, but I guess we > lack a national > Carillon! Gosh, the National Cathedral in D. C. has > bells but I am not sure > if there is actually a Carillon.   __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around http://mail.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Re: Questions I have about Carillons From: "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> Date: Mon, 9 May 2005 20:06:51 -0400   This is most informative, Ross. Apparently your schwa (that is, the "sort-of-indeterminate vowel sound" you allude to: see, for example: http://englishplus.com/grammar/00000383.htm ) is a short "i"; while for us in the States it is more like an "uh." Though I guess that would put us Americans, in your estimation, in the category of "non-native-English-speakers." Being both a French professor and a "university carillonneur" (which I put in quotes because it is not a real carillon) I think I know how to pronounce the word, but I won't attempt to explain how to do so without the universal phonetic alphabet, which I doubt would come through on our list serve--it would be too hard to try. I'm just wondering if the alleged change from "carillonneur" to "carillonist" (which I had never heard of, despite have read a couple of years' worth of messages on the Guild of Carillonneurs in North America list serve-- by the way, they have not changed their name to the Guild of Carillonists In North America yet) and which I see no grounds for believing is true, is motivated, should it indeed exist, by the same francophobia that led to "freedom fries" in the United States Senate Cafeteria or instead by a sense of shame at being unable to pronounce the word "carillonneur." Maybe it's just a southern hermisphere thing.   Cheers,   Randy Runyon     On May 9, 2005, at 6:22 PM, TheShieling wrote:   >> How is that that the a of the first syllable becomes an i? Is this >> > how New Zealanders speak? > > I was trying (obviously not very well) that it is the 2nd syllable of > "carillon" is stressed here. The first is a sort-of-indeterminate > vowel > sound, as is very common in English. > Think, for example, of Edward (pronounced "Ed-wid") or Robert ("rob- > it") or > mountain ("moun-tin"). Or, when we pronounce "fish and chips" as > "fish-n-chips". > > Even the word "pronounce" is not usually said that way in ordinary > speech, > with the first syllable as "proh" but rather almost "pri-nounce" > with the > stress on the second syllable. > > English does this throughout the world and it is one of the ways of > spotting > non-native-English-speakers that they don't do it well, or at all, > or in > ways the rest of use are not used to. > > Ross > > > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> > >    
(back) Subject: Re: Questions I have about the French From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Mon, 9 May 2005 17:17:15 -0700 (PDT)   Hello,   No, it's an English thing as well!   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK     --- Randolph Runyon <runyonr@muohio.edu> wrote:   > francophobia .......Maybe it's just a southern > hermisphere thing.       Yahoo! Mail Stay connected, organized, and protected. Take the tour: http://tour.mail.yahoo.com/mailtour.html    
(back) Subject: unique carillon installations From: "Tim Bovard" <tmbovard@earthlink.net> Date: Mon, 09 May 2005 19:16:37 -0500   I know of a large church which owns a vintage set of Deagan Tower Chimes (huge tubular bells -- another variant of the carillon). Several decades ago, apparently during some renovation project or other involving the tower, funds were allocated for the restoration of the Chimes, which had fallen into disrepair.   Incidentally, the Tower Chimes, though quite audible anywhere within a couple blocks outside of the church building, are only barely dicernable *inside* when they are being played. You have to listen really hard, and it has to be nearly totally silent otherwise.   The funny thing was, once the restoration in the tower was complete, somebody finally noticed that there was no longer any way to actually *PLAY* the Chimes. Whatever keyboard/mechanisms/wiring that might have operated them originally was LONG gone, without a trace. (ooops....!)   This problem was solved at the time, by wiring them into the organ console =   and relay, such that they played from the only 'extra' drawknob available. =   (provided as a prep, for an additional stop that had never been added)   That drawknob was then, and remains to this day, engraved TROMPETTE EN CHAMADE 8' .   --Tim :-) :-)   At 09:49 AM 5/9/2005, Victoria wrote: >The Carillon at First Presbyterian in Southampton, NY is controlled by a >stop on the Austin organ. When I subbed there, the organist graciously >red-flagged this stop so I would accidentally serenade Main Street. <g>      
(back) Subject: Re: Questions I have about Carillons From: "robertelms" <robertelms@westnet.com.au> Date: Tue, 10 May 2005 08:26:11 +0800   You could have fooled me, Ross! We in OZ can pick a Kiwi immediately = through the pronunciation of the vowel sounds. "Cat" becomes "cet", "i" sounds become "u" (fush and chups) and "e" becomes "i". Only "o" remains unscathed!! Can you pick an Aussie? I have been listening to the cricket commentators on Foxtel TV and some are very broad along the above lines of =   vowel pronunciation. On the other hand we all seem to play the organ using our fingers! By the way Carillon is pronounced "kurillion" here too rather than "kureeyon" as in the French word. ..Bob Elms   ----- Original Message ----- From: "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> To: "'PipeChat'" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Tuesday, May 10, 2005 6:22 AM Subject: RE: Questions I have about Carillons     > >How is that that the a of the first syllable becomes an i? Is this > how New Zealanders speak? > > I was trying (obviously not very well) that it is the 2nd syllable of > "carillon" is stressed here. The first is a sort-of-indeterminate vowel > sound, as is very common in English. > Think, for example, of Edward (pronounced "Ed-wid") or Robert ("rob-it") =   > or > mountain ("moun-tin"). Or, when we pronounce "fish and chips" as > "fish-n-chips". > > Even the word "pronounce" is not usually said that way in ordinary = speech, > with the first syllable as "proh" but rather almost "pri-nounce" with = the > stress on the second syllable. > > English does this throughout the world and it is one of the ways of > spotting > non-native-English-speakers that they don't do it well, or at all, or in > ways the rest of use are not used to. > > Ross >       -- No virus found in this outgoing message. Checked by AVG Anti-Virus. Version: 7.0.308 / Virus Database: 266.11.6 - Release Date: 6/05/2005    
(back) Subject: Re: Questions I have about the French From: "N. Russotto" <ravenrockdesigns@gmail.com> Date: Mon, 9 May 2005 20:07:18 -0500   Non! Je pense est tout le monde, n'est pas?   What a great line of subjects we can do with "Questions I have about the. .= . "   Nick     On 5/9/05, Colin Mitchell <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> wrote: > Hello, >=20 > No, it's an English thing as well! >=20 > Regards, >=20 > Colin Mitchell UK=20 >=20 >=20 > --- Randolph Runyon <runyonr@muohio.edu> wrote: >=20 > > francophobia .......Maybe it's just a southern > > hermisphere thing. >=20 >=20 >=20 > =09=09 > Yahoo! Mail > Stay connected, organized, and protected. Take the tour: > http://tour.mail.yahoo.com/mailtour.html >=20 >=20 > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> >=20 >=20   --=20 Nicholas F. Russotto Somers, Connecticut Organist, Holy Cross PNCC Enfield, Connecticut Moderator/Owner: Monarch of Music=20 http://launch.groups.yahoo.com/group/monarch_of_music/