PipeChat Digest #5324 - Tuesday, May 10, 2005
 
Re: Pipe Organs in Charlotte, NC
  by "Karl Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu>
Re: Questions I have about Carillons
  by <DudelK@aol.com>
Re: UV Protection-other pictures of nave
  by "Daniel Hancock" <dhancock@brpae.com>
Re:Carillons
  by <RMB10@aol.com>
Who's on First? [was: UV Protection-...]
  by "Jan Nijhuis" <nijhuis.jan@gmail.com>
Charlie's installation
  by "Paul Kealy" <imkealy@yahoo.com>
RE: Questions I have about Carillons
  by "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
RE: Questions I have about Carillons
  by "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Pipe Organs in Charlotte, NC From: "Karl Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu> Date: Mon, 09 May 2005 21:15:42 -0400   Dear Monty,   I really appreciate your message. I've been busy with other things, bu= t my travels northward starting 14 August in Orlando are beginning to take shape. I'll likely get to the Charlotte area by Tuesday 16 August.   I once played a Zimmer in Lancaster PA and had a bit of contact with Franz Zimmer. What is the state of that firm at this point? I understand that there was a parting of ways in the family and firm, one part going digital. Is the "more traditional" Zimmer firm still functioning to any extent that I would enjoy getting to their place? Do I recall a Pineville address for them?=20   I would take time for one organ -- or two at the most. I won't repeat you -- but what's your advice as to what I'd find most interesting? (I don'= t consider M=F6ller or Wicks of much interest, I must confess.)   Thanx for your kind help.   Karl E. Moyer Lancaster PA   On 5/9/05 7:58 PM, "RMB10@aol.com" <RMB10@aol.com> wrote:   > There are plenty of organs in Charlotte, NC. We have an active AGO chapt= er > which sponsors monthly activities as well as a weekly concert series duri= ng > the=20 > summer (June 5- August 28). These concerts feature most of the pipe orga= ns > around the Charlotte area. > Charlotte is most famous for the 205 rank Moller organ of Calvary Church, > but Charlotte also is home to several large Aeolian-Skinner organs, as we= ll as > some nice Casavants, as well as many Mollers, Zimmers, a couple of Wicks,= a > Brunzema, some Austins, Schantzes, as well as some instruments by local > builders=20 > such as the Knowlton organ I play, and in the outlying areas, there are s= ome > other organ treasures to behold. >=20 > Check out the Charlotte AGO Chapter's website at www.charlotteago.org to = find > out what is happening. >=20 > Monty Bennett >=20 > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> >=20    
(back) Subject: Re: Questions I have about Carillons From: <DudelK@aol.com> Date: Mon, 9 May 2005 21:18:23 EDT   The cathedral carillon went in when the Gloria in Excelsis tower was = built. If memory serves, the tower was dedicated on Ascension Day 1964. My first = visit to Washington was during Easter week that year. The 12rk carillon mixture you're thinking of is the one on my little Roy Rodgers hausorgel, perhaps = . . ..The other stop is a 16' schwebung. Small, but judiciously unified and = uncommonly versatile.  
(back) Subject: Re: UV Protection-other pictures of nave From: "Daniel Hancock" <dhancock@brpae.com> Date: Mon, 9 May 2005 20:36:00 -0500   I'm sorry to have been so unclear in posting my question, but it was inde= ed Jan Nijhuis who posted the link to the pictures. It was my fault in n= ot editing the posting so that this was evident. But, as subsequent post= ings have alluded to, it is a Casavant. =20 =20 All the best. =20 Daniel Hancock   =20 >From: "N. Russotto" <ravenrockdesigns@gmail.com> >Date: Mon, 9 May 2005 19:22:01 -0400>> > >No. . . I was referring to the link taht you posted. > NFR   > On 5/9/05, Daniel Hancock <dhancock@brpae.com> wrote: >> >> I'm not sure. The original posting wasn't mine...I was just begging a >> question about one of the photographs of the nave. Jan Nijhuis will >> have to answer questions about the organ. >> >> Daniel Hancock  
(back) Subject: Re:Carillons From: <RMB10@aol.com> Date: Mon, 9 May 2005 22:22:49 EDT   For information about carillons, check out the website of the Guild of Carillonneurs of North America. www.gcna.org That site gives a lot of = information about the history of the carillon, information about where there are carillons in the US, and also ranks them by size.   The largest carillon in the world is at The Riverside Church, New York City--not only by number of bells, but also by weight.   Speaking as a carilloneur, the electric action carillon is not really = looked upon favorably, sort of the equal of the digital organ in pipe organ = circles. Although many new instruments will have dual strikers so the instrument = can be played by a mechanical clavier as well as by electrical means from an = organ console or by a remote keyboard. The thing about electric actions is that =   there is generally no means of expression as there is with the mechanical clavier, when you play a key, the striker plays--end of story. With a = "real" clavier, you can control dynamics. For a good musician, this gives a lot = of artistic expression on the bells and is frustrating on an electric keyboard.   As to female carilloneurs, there are several that come to mind: Beverly Buchanan, Margo Halstead, Mary McFarland, Linda Dzuris, Sally Slade = Warner.   Monty Bennett  
(back) Subject: Who's on First? [was: UV Protection-...] From: "Jan Nijhuis" <nijhuis.jan@gmail.com> Date: Mon, 9 May 2005 19:47:11 -0700   mmmm, Thanks for the complement, but I beg to differ.=20   I only posted the link to Amoskeag Presbyterian, Manchester, NH. My only point was that stained glass windows can be protected from vandalism and the console can resist "Acts of God" (Genesis 1:3-4) without destroying the aesthetics of a building.   The original link with the interior of Faith Lutheran came from Charlie Lester (crl@137.com).   .... and I wanna hear him play the Theramin in worship. (check out his site.= )   Askew to the topic, a friend from work and I were noodling with his Theramin and after an hour or so decided that "O Sacred Head Now Wounded" on the ooo-eee-ooo box was very wrong.   On 5/9/05, Daniel Hancock <dhancock@brpae.com> wrote: > I'm sorry to have been so unclear in posting my question, but it was inde= ed Jan Nijhuis who posted the link to the pictures. It was my fault in not= editing the posting so that this was evident. But, as subsequent postings= have alluded to, it is a Casavant. >=20 > All the best. >=20 > Daniel Hancock >=20 > >From: "N. Russotto" <ravenrockdesigns@gmail.com> > >Date: Mon, 9 May 2005 19:22:01 -0400>> > > > >No. . . I was referring to the link taht you posted. > > NFR >=20 > > On 5/9/05, Daniel Hancock <dhancock@brpae.com> wrote: > >> > >> I'm not sure. The original posting wasn't mine...I was just begging a > >> question about one of the photographs of the nave. Jan Nijhuis will > >> have to answer questions about the organ. > >> > >> Daniel Hancock   --=20 Jan Nijhuis nijhuis.jan@gmail.com  
(back) Subject: Charlie's installation From: "Paul Kealy" <imkealy@yahoo.com> Date: Mon, 9 May 2005 21:26:55 -0700 (PDT)   I had the privilege of a concert there back a coupla years ago ... and heard what a fantastic job Charlie Lester has done fitting the organ sound into a less than ideal location. I like the Cassavant sound - that's what we had at U of Redlands (CA) chapel.   How many of us have had to serve a building whose acoustical space was wasted shamefully by architects who do not respect that the instrument IS part of the building.   He has obviously spent a lot of time and energy on this organ project. I'm encouraged when an organist/inventor goes so far to enhance the sound. These things don't work themselves out on their own, now do they?   I wonder if the congregation has a clue of the work he has done to benefit the sound of worship.   On his website Charlie has documented how he has incorporated today's technology to augment the organ sound, experimenting here and there until he got it workable.   Makes me think of the emerging sounds of early organs of bygone centuries ... what early churchgoers must have enjoyed hearing from week to week as inventive organists assembled and tweaked their installations to create and perfect what too often today is simply relegated to a music committee and architects when a church is blueprinted.   And that little downstairs console serves the musical variety in a way that sounds OK, helping solve the variety of music with the necessary traipsing upstairs and down to access the Cassavant.   Variety is big with Charlie, who is proficient on Moog and the Thereminvox as well as organ (now there's a wide variety, but he pulls it off in concert!).     =3D-> Incidentally, Charlie, what is shown in the middle of the right seating section in the nave? A small console? A sound-system "booth?" A keyboard? <-=3D  
(back) Subject: RE: Questions I have about Carillons From: "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Tue, 10 May 2005 16:48:02 +1200   >I'm just wondering if the alleged change from "carillonneur" to "carillonist" (which I had never heard of, despite have read a couple of years' worth of messages on the Guild of Carillonneurs in North America list serve-- by the way, they have not changed their name to the Guild of Carillonists In North America yet) and which I see no grounds for believing is true, is motivated, should it indeed exist, by the same francophobia that led to "freedom fries" in the United States Senate Cafeteria or instead by a sense of shame at being unable to pronounce the word "carillonneur." Maybe it's just a southern hermisphere thing.   Certainly the word came to us from the USA and is not a Southern = Hemisphere thing at all, as no one used the term "carillonist" until Tim Hurd brought it here, and, as I mentioned, he's an American born and bread. I believe part of his business is still located in Seattle.   Ross    
(back) Subject: RE: Questions I have about Carillons From: "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Tue, 10 May 2005 17:00:35 +1200   >You could have fooled me, Ross! We in OZ can pick a Kiwi immediately through the pronunciation of the vowel sounds. "Cat" becomes "cet", "i" sounds become "u" (fush and chups) and "e" becomes "i". Only "o" remains unscathed!! Can you pick an Aussie? I have been listening to the cricket commentators on Foxtel TV and some are very broad along the above lines of =   vowel pronunciation.   Bob, I'd better not get started on the difference between OZ and Godzone pronunciation, except to say that it always amuses us to hear Ozzies say "Seednee" instead of "sid-nee". Your vowels are rather different from = those here way across the ditch to your east. ;-) Ozzies usually say "danss" = and "transs", too, instead of "dahnss" and "trahnss". We sure can tell an = Ozzie, not only from the proncunciation.   In 1992 we Lynda and I were in London and went to a service at St Paul's, = me in shorts and sandals. The Dean was in the pulpit before the service, welcoming everyone (about 200 of us under the dome). He mentioned seeing people from various countries and then looked straight at me, and said, = "Ah, there's either an Ozzie or a Kiwi. Let's see...hmm, I bet you're a Kiwi = and not an Ozzie. If that's right, please wave." I duly waved, to the roar of laughter of everyone present. The Dean continued, "I could tell that, as = the hat he's carrying hasn't any corks hanging from the brim."   Really very very funny, and everyone laughed but my wife, who gave me a blast afterwards for wearing shorts and sandals there. The music was excellent, the preaching excellent, the whole "choreography" excellent, = the building is quite magnificent, and yet the Dean turned the whole place = into a warm parish family church. Nothing but praise from me for the way things were done.   Ross   P.S. I think I almost got this on-topic! :-)