PipeChat Digest #5327 - Wednesday, May 11, 2005
 
Re: Organ Nonsense
  by "Stephen Best" <stevebest@usadatanet.net>
Re: Teach them how to play hymns
  by "robertelms" <robertelms@westnet.com.au>
Re: Organ Nonsense
  by "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net>
Re:  Organ Nonsense
  by <SWF12262@aol.com>
Re: Cross Posted
  by <Justinhartz@aol.com>
Re: Organ Nonsense
  by <ProOrgo53@aol.com>
Non-Greek organic instruments
  by "Lin Yangchen" <yangchen@raffles.org>
RE: Questions I have about Mono Recordings
  by "Will Light" <will.light@btinternet.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Organ Nonsense From: "Stephen Best" <stevebest@usadatanet.net> Date: Tue, 10 May 2005 22:40:36 -0400   One organ by a local charlatan had an 8' Principle on the great -- very strange for an organ "builder" who was complete lacking in principle himself.   Steve Best in Utica, NY   Nathan Smith wrote:   > Hi list, > > In an effort to lighten up today, I post the following question: > > What is the funniest silly organ stop name you can come up with? > For example, 8' Open Gedeckt, 8' Aeoline Profunda, 8' Dulciana Magna, > or even 8' Krummhorn Celeste.... > > - Nate    
(back) Subject: Re: Teach them how to play hymns From: "robertelms" <robertelms@westnet.com.au> Date: Wed, 11 May 2005 11:23:03 +0800   I agree one hundred percent with Monty's assessment of what makes a church =   organist. In my denomination hymn playing is the most important part of service playing and rhythm is the most important part of hymn playing. As for improvisations and voluntaries, in most churches where I play the cacophany of voices before and after the service of this member of the congregation loudly greeting all and sundry means that it doesn't matter very much what is played. Few are listening. Bob Elms. > While these are necessary skills for a church organists, the MOST > important > skill is hymn playing. The number of organists who can not keep a = steady > beat > is absolutely astounding. snip> > Hymn playing is the skill that needs to be honed BEFORE skills like > transposition and improvisation.       -- No virus found in this outgoing message. Checked by AVG Anti-Virus. Version: 7.0.308 / Virus Database: 266.11.8 - Release Date: 10/05/2005    
(back) Subject: Re: Organ Nonsense From: "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net> Date: Tue, 10 May 2005 23:34:26 -0400   Dear Listpersons,   I did report the following once before, but probably eight or ten years = ago, and on PipOrg-L. It is true.   I visited All Saints', Wynnewood once, just outside of Philadelphia. Peter =   Conte had been Organist there at one time, and had caused to be engraved a =   blank stop now with the legend: "Pulpit Off." Can you top that?   Cheers,   Malcolm   ----- Original Message ----- From: "Stephen Best" <stevebest@usadatanet.net> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Tuesday, May 10, 2005 10:40 PM Subject: Re: Organ Nonsense     > One organ by a local charlatan had an 8' Principle on the great -- very > strange for an organ "builder" who was complete lacking in principle > himself. > > Steve Best in Utica, NY > > Nathan Smith wrote: > >> Hi list, >> >> In an effort to lighten up today, I post the following question: >> >> What is the funniest silly organ stop name you can come up with? = For >> example, 8' Open Gedeckt, 8' Aeoline Profunda, 8' Dulciana Magna, or = even >> 8' Krummhorn Celeste.... >> >> - Nate      
(back) Subject: Re: Organ Nonsense From: <SWF12262@aol.com> Date: Tue, 10 May 2005 23:56:56 EDT     How about Flatulant Pachyderm 32'? Steve      
(back) Subject: Re: Cross Posted From: <Justinhartz@aol.com> Date: Wed, 11 May 2005 00:26:09 EDT   Unless you can fess up and tell us in which MAJOR New York = conservatory this organist is studying, we must consider this unprofessional behavior = for what it is -- rumor mongering.   The school certainly can't be The Juilliard School.   When I applied to Juilliard, in order to be accepted into the master's =   program organ majors had to improvise, transpose scores at sight up to a = major third in either direction, play from a full orchestral score, realize = figured bass at sight, demonstrate knowledge of organ construction, and have = choral and other ensemble experience. This was in addition to the audition, in which we submitted a list of compositions from a variety of periods and styles and the jury selected = the ones they wished to hear. No registrant was allowed.   Please don't knock an organist from a MAJOR New York conservatory = unless you are a graduate of the school yourself.   Justin Hartz MMus Juilliard 1987  
(back) Subject: Re: Organ Nonsense From: <ProOrgo53@aol.com> Date: Wed, 11 May 2005 00:33:14 EDT   How about "Cor de Nuit-nuit" ?  
(back) Subject: Non-Greek organic instruments From: "Lin Yangchen" <yangchen@raffles.org> Date: Tue, 10 May 2005 21:38:27 -0700 (PDT)   hello chatters,   There's a traditional chinese free-reed mouth organ called the Sheng, with = its metal resonators arranged somewhat like the diatonic layout of pipes = on a western windchest. The instrument comes in three sizes, small, medium = and large. The 'keys' are circular buttons in black and white.   During an expedition to northern Thailand, I had the fortune to hear a = traditional Southeast Asian free-reed mouth organ called the Khaen, being = played in a religious ceremony of the Lahu hill tribe. The arrangement of = the slender bamboo resonators resembles the logarithmic progression of = chromatic pipe lengths, although the temperament and the modes used are = different. This instrument also comes in different sizes and is held by = the hand (and played while dancing) unlike the Sheng which is placed on = the floor like a positive.   They sound much more reedy than the free-reed stops that you would find in = organs in the west.   I am no expert on these instruments; much information about their history = and physics exists on the internet.   Yangchen Lin Singapore http://sps.nus.edu.sg/~linyangc/  
(back) Subject: RE: Questions I have about Mono Recordings From: "Will Light" <will.light@btinternet.com> Date: Wed, 11 May 2005 09:11:28 +0100   I don't think a mono recording would play slowly Channing. In a stero recording there are two "tracks" which are slightly different, recorded = by two different microphones - rather like we have two ears. When it is played back we can hear where the instruments in the = orchestra are placed, like we can with our ears. A mono recording is made with just one microphone. If it is put onto a = CD then both the two tracks will have exactly the same recording on them. = When you play it, it will not be slow - you will just not get the same = "spacial layout" information - it will just all come from the centre of the sound image.   Will Light Coventry UK   -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of Channing Ashbaugh Sent: 11 May 2005 02:41 To: PipeChat Subject: Re: Questions I have about Mono Recordings   Hello everyone     I have some questions about Mono recordings I have heard Carillon CDs = for   carillon CD Players are recorded in mono and if you put these mono=20 recordings in a cd player like a computer cd-rom or a jambox it would = sound=20 slow I have interest in hearing a mono recording that sounds slow I am=20 doing a report on this . Has anyone ever heard a mono recorded CD play = slow   before? Has anyone ever tried makeing some mp3s or a wav file from a = mono=20 recorded cd? If you know the answers please e-mail me at=20 channing28270@yahoo.com   channing=20     ****************************************************************** "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org>