PipeChat Digest #5329 - Wednesday, May 11, 2005
 
Re: Questions I have about Mono Recordings
  by "Jan Nijhuis" <nijhuis.jan@gmail.com>
Re: Non-Greek organic words no.2
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: Organ Sense - a real 4/5' stop
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Teach them to play hymns
  by "Keith Zimmerman" <kwzimmerman@alltel.net>
Re: Teach them how to play hymns
  by "Desiree'" <nicemusica@yahoo.com>
Re: Non-Greek organic words no.2
  by "Jarle Fagerheim" <jarle_fagerheim@yahoo.co.uk>
Remembrance Day Music
  by "Benjamin A Kolodziej" <bkolodzi@smu.edu>
RE: Kist by a Scot
  by "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
Re: Teach them to play hymns
  by "Jan Nijhuis" <nijhuis.jan@gmail.com>
The Wedding from HELL!
  by "N. Russotto" <ravenrockdesigns@gmail.com>
If Organists Wrote the Wedding Column
  by "N. Russotto" <ravenrockdesigns@gmail.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Questions I have about Mono Recordings From: "Jan Nijhuis" <nijhuis.jan@gmail.com> Date: Wed, 11 May 2005 10:53:09 -0700   I agree that an audio CD is an audio CD and it isn't going to matter where you play it back. There is DJ equipment that will allow CD's to be played back at +/- ~10% (to keep that all important "dance groove" going) and of course there are software utilities like slowblast (www.slowblast.com) that will convert audio CD samples to wave and play them back at a variable speed ostensibly for ear training and as an aid to transcribe music.   Because the format is digital, the pitch does not change, but strange artifacts are noticeable at the limits of the software/hardware.   On 5/11/05, David Boothe <dmboothe@yahoo.com> wrote: > The "Red Book," which is the standard for audio CDs, > requires two audio channels. Any CD which is a mono > recording will have the same thing recorded on both > channels, but it still must have 2 channels to be a "Red > Book" CD. >=20 > If the carillon recording is mono it is either: >=20 > 1. A "Red Book" CD with the same thing on both channels, > or >=20 > 2. A data CD with mono sound files, possibly in some > obscure or proprietary format. >=20 > If #1 is the case, it should play in your CD player just > fine. If #2 is the case, you CD player won't even > recognize it as a CD and just give you a blank stare. >=20 > -David. >=20 > --- Will Light <will.light@btinternet.com> wrote: > > I don't think a mono recording would play slowly > > Channing. In a stero > > recording there are two "tracks" which are slightly > > different, recorded by > > two different microphones - rather like we have two ears. > > When it is played back we can hear where the instruments > > in the orchestra > > are placed, like we can with our ears. > > A mono recording is made with just one microphone. If it > > is put onto a CD > > then both the two tracks will have exactly the same > > recording on them. When > > you play it, it will not be slow - you will just not get > > the same "spacial > > layout" information - it will just all come from the > > centre of the sound > > image. > > > > Will Light > > Coventry UK > > > > -----Original Message----- > > From: pipechat@pipechat.org > > [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of > > Channing Ashbaugh > > Sent: 11 May 2005 02:41 > > To: PipeChat > > Subject: Re: Questions I have about Mono Recordings > > > > Hello everyone > > > > > > I have some questions about Mono recordings I have > > heard Carillon CDs for > > > > carillon CD Players are recorded in mono and if you put > > these mono > > recordings in a cd player like a computer cd-rom or a > > jambox it would sound > > slow I have interest in hearing a mono recording that > > sounds slow I am > > doing a report on this . Has anyone ever heard a mono > > recorded CD play slow > > > > before? Has anyone ever tried makeing some mp3s or a wav > > file from a mono > > recorded cd? If you know the answers please e-mail me at > > channing28270@yahoo.com > > > > channing   --=20 Jan Nijhuis nijhuis.jan@gmail.com  
(back) Subject: Re: Non-Greek organic words no.2 From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Wed, 11 May 2005 11:27:24 -0700 (PDT)   Hello,   Jarle has changed the rules of the game, and I'm crying, "Foul!"   I think he originally asked if there were any words for organ which did not derive from the Greek 'organum'.   I reckon that "Kist o'Whistles" does not derive from the Greek "organum", even allowing for the fact that organs may be placed in crates and whistled aboard the cargo ships of Greek businessmen.   ;-)   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK   --- Jarle Fagerheim <jarle_fagerheim@yahoo.co.uk> wrote: > Well, "kist" (south-west Norwegian, Old Norse, and > Proto-Germanic > "kista"), is an early borrowing from Latin "cista", > which in turn > borrowed it from ... Greek! "Whistle" can be traced > in a straight line > from Modern English to Proto-Indo-European, though.     __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around http://mail.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Re: Organ Sense - a real 4/5' stop From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Wed, 11 May 2005 14:28:44 EDT   If you'd like to hear a recording of a very successful 4/5' stop, = order "A Small Wonder: Music from Alexander Chapel," a CD that's available = through my website or through the Organ Historical Society. If properly scaled and voiced, such a stop can be truly musical and useful. Some list members already have this recording.   Sebastian M. Gluck http://www.glucknewyork.com/  
(back) Subject: Teach them to play hymns From: "Keith Zimmerman" <kwzimmerman@alltel.net> Date: Wed, 11 May 2005 14:44:57 -0400   I wonder if the "basics" of playing hymns are really "caught" rather than "taught".   By basics, I mean the way many of us (we amateurs so disliked by many of you) started playing them on the organ whenever it was that we had to transform from a pianist into an organist - right hand just as it is in = the hymnbook. left hand plays mainly the tenor, and the feet play the bass part. For a touch of variety, we might play the melody on one manual = using a solo stop while the left hand plays chords on the other manual, and the feet continue the bass. Much later, we   My experience has been limited to Baptist, Methodist, and Presbyterian churches. I've never attended a mass. I've been to a Lutheran service = once and an Episcopal service once. I've never heard an organist accompany = hymns that didn't exhibit rhythm, so I don't know what y'all mean by that.   There was a thread some time in the past which discussed the benefit of = the organist being of the same faith as the church in which s/he played. I remember there being some strong opinions expressed, so I don't want to = get that started again, but . .   isn't it much easier to teach someone to play and improvise hymns when the pupil is simply being formally "taught" to play from the bench that which s/he had "caught" over the years of singing and hearing these hymns from = the pew?   When I started learning to play hymns on the piano, I had already attended church (even prenatally). I was learning to play the hymns I had grown up with. It was upon this foundation that I have learned to add to the hymns to make them more enjoyable or interesting.   The following is purely a technical statement, not one meant to pass judgement upon another . . .   Could part of the problem be that we trying to teach the "unchurched" to lead in church worship? Could it be that leading worship from the organ bench might involve some "touchy-feely", aesthetic, or mystical aspects = that are difficult to teach to those who have not been brought up in church?   just my thoughts, again, not trying to pass judgement on anyone, keith    
(back) Subject: Re: Teach them how to play hymns From: "Desiree'" <nicemusica@yahoo.com> Date: Wed, 11 May 2005 12:14:17 -0700 (PDT)   I would think that cources in Service Playing, Improvisation, Hymnology, = etc would be among the coursework at these so called "Major" = conservatories. If not a part of the course work, certainly a part of the = lessons.     --------------------------------- Discover Yahoo! Stay in touch with email, IM, photo sharing & more. Check it out!
(back) Subject: Re: Non-Greek organic words no.2 From: "Jarle Fagerheim" <jarle_fagerheim@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Wed, 11 May 2005 22:57:32 +0200   Colin Mitchell wrote: > I think he originally asked if there were any words > for organ which did not derive from the Greek > 'organum'. Correct. Still, I didn't try to change the rules, just to correct your slightly incorrect statement that "kist o'whussles/whistles" is "definitely NOT Greek in origin" ;).   Perhaps we should compile a list of all known words for organ? That'd be great fun, I think!   -- Beste helsing / Best wishes / Beste Gr=C3=BC=C3=9Fe / Bestu kvedjur   Jarle Fagerheim   jarle_fagerheim@yahoo.co.uk www: http://jarle.moo.no  
(back) Subject: Remembrance Day Music From: "Benjamin A Kolodziej" <bkolodzi@smu.edu> Date: Wed, 11 May 2005 16:24:32 -0500   Dear Pipechat:   I'll be playing some concerts in the UK during the first couple weeks of November. I was thinking it would be neat to do at least one program of Remembrance Day music. Has anybody performed a program like this? What = did you perform? What might be some music appropriate for the occasion? I am =   always looking for excuses to learn more repertoire, and perhaps this = might steer me in a musical direction towards which I might not gravitate on my own. Thanks in advance.   Benjamin Kolodziej Dallas, TX    
(back) Subject: RE: Kist by a Scot From: "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Thu, 12 May 2005 09:34:58 +1200   >Quite wrong Ross, I am indeed Scots by descent, if not by intention.   OK Colin, happy to apologise for my mistake and accept you! :-)   >I would refer you to the following extract from an account of Dr.Sankey's travels and ministry in Scotland; the author of which, I believe, was Ian Sankey.   He was, as you will know, the partner of Moody, the ditty writer.   >especially those who suffer chill winds around the Trossachs region.   It is not polite to refer to people's Trossachs in public, but less rude than to refer to their Torridons and Grampians.   >evidence came to light with the discovery of a Haggis pelt poltice close to the summit of Bidean Nam Bian, in the Glencoe Mountains, on which had been written the words "Dab yer kist twa a'day" and bearing the signature of one "Dr.Cameron - Tannochbrae".   Of course, Dr Cameron often prescribed for the Lairig-Grue (often misspelt as Lairig Gru, not surprisingly).   >Genetic investigation demonstrated that the Haggis pelt had been coated with wild-honey, finest malt whiskey, heather seeds and herbs, and after more than a century, still remained supple and retained a not unpleasant odour.   Sadly, I'm a heretic in not liking any kind of whisky. I refuse, though, = to accept the idea of a Scottish whiskey: SURELY you mean whisky? Please tell me that was only a typo, please.   Ross      
(back) Subject: Re: Teach them to play hymns From: "Jan Nijhuis" <nijhuis.jan@gmail.com> Date: Wed, 11 May 2005 16:07:54 -0700   And then I make the amatures look professional ... with my one manual and feet frimly planted on the ground.   I do what I do because I can ... and without me I fear there would be no traditional hymn music in my church. Everything would probably swing to "contemporary" with the sporadic "gospel pianist" (retired RV travelling couple) thrown in for good measure. We're pretty "radical" as it is, but that definitely would not be what you'd expect in an Orthodox Presbyterian Chruch.   While I'd love to develop more as a player, I don't know how to go about finding an organ teacher. There are plenty of churches arround .... most of 'em up-start contemporary. The few older churches I have visited may have organs, but I don't know that their organists know any more than I, or have the inclination to teach.   90%* of whatever I play originates in a hymnal. I've stretched far beyond the Denominational hymnbook and I like to pull unfamiliar (to our congregation) hymn tunes from other sources. Face it, hymns are easy pickin's for preludes and offertories.   * The other 10% is writing out chords for the guitarists 'cause reading notation isn't an option.   On 5/11/05, Keith Zimmerman <kwzimmerman@alltel.net> wrote: > I wonder if the "basics" of playing hymns are really "caught" rather than > "taught". >=20 > By basics, I mean the way many of us (we amateurs so disliked by many of > you) started playing them on the organ whenever it was that we had to > transform from a pianist into an organist - right hand just as it is in t= he > hymnbook. left hand plays mainly the tenor, and the feet play the bass > part. For a touch of variety, we might play the melody on one manual usi= ng > a solo stop while the left hand plays chords on the other manual, and the > feet continue the bass. Much later, we >=20 > My experience has been limited to Baptist, Methodist, and Presbyterian > churches. I've never attended a mass. I've been to a Lutheran service on= ce > and an Episcopal service once. I've never heard an organist accompany hy= mns > that didn't exhibit rhythm, so I don't know what y'all mean by that. >=20 > There was a thread some time in the past which discussed the benefit of t= he > organist being of the same faith as the church in which s/he played. I > remember there being some strong opinions expressed, so I don't want to g= et > that started again, but . . >=20 > isn't it much easier to teach someone to play and improvise hymns when th= e > pupil is simply being formally "taught" to play from the bench that which > s/he had "caught" over the years of singing and hearing these hymns from = the > pew? >=20 > When I started learning to play hymns on the piano, I had already attende= d > church (even prenatally). I was learning to play the hymns I had grown u= p > with. It was upon this foundation that I have learned to add to the hymn= s > to make them more enjoyable or interesting. >=20 > The following is purely a technical statement, not one meant to pass > judgement upon another . . . >=20 > Could part of the problem be that we trying to teach the "unchurched" to > lead in church worship? Could it be that leading worship from the organ > bench might involve some "touchy-feely", aesthetic, or mystical aspects t= hat > are difficult to teach to those who have not been brought up in church? >=20 > just my thoughts, again, not trying to pass judgement on anyone, > keith   --=20 Jan Nijhuis nijhuis.jan@gmail.com  
(back) Subject: The Wedding from HELL! From: "N. Russotto" <ravenrockdesigns@gmail.com> Date: Wed, 11 May 2005 19:39:33 -0400   Dear Bandleader:=20   We look forward to your performance at our daughter's wedding. If you don't= =20 mind, we would like to request a few of our favorite songs. Please play=20 these during the reception:=20   A Keith Jarrett composition from his solo series. Please arrange it for ful= l=20 ensemble in the keyof B but nothing in 4/4 please.=20   Mahavishnu Orchestra, "Dance of the Maya" and please have the guitarist pla= y=20 John Mclaughlin's solo from the live performance Nov. 16, 1972 at Chrysler= =20 Arena. My wife and I were at that show and we liked his use of polyrhythms.= =20   One of John Coltrane's duets with Pharaoh Sanders. Our guests love high=20 register tenor saxes.=20   We thought a little Stravinsky right after the toast would be nice. So=20 please play "The Rite of Spring." We like a tempo of about 1/4 note =3D 93 = and=20 transpose it down 3 half-steps - it will be so much more appropriate for=20 this occasion in the slightly lower register.=20   Then for the candle lighting ceremony, please play Frank Zappa's "The Grand= =20 Wazoo." The original key of B flat, would be fine but my cousin Jeannie=20 would like to sing the baritone sax solo in the key of D--she has kind of a= =20 high voice.=20   When my new son-in-law takes off the garter, please just a little of=20 Varese's "Ionization." It's such a funny piece, we think it would go over= =20 real well. Much better than "The Stripper."=20   And for the bride and groom's first dance, please slow things down a bit by= =20 doing Barber's "Adagio For Strings." It's so much better than "We've Only= =20 Just Begun" or the "Anniversary Waltz."=20   When my wife and I join in the first dance, could you segue to Thelonius=20 Monk's "Ruby, My Dear" - it's in honor of my wife's grandmother whose name= =20 was Ruby. It would mean so much to the family.=20   Thanks for all your help. Depending on the outcome we'll certainly be happy= =20 to recommend your band to our friends We'll have your check for the fee of= =20 $250 (minus our expenses in contacting you of $12.50 ) by the end of next= =20 month: we're a little short as the young lady doing the balloon arch wanted= =20 her $1,850 in advance and the DJ had to be paid up front his $2,500 as=20 normal. Our daughter assured us that your love of music was greater than=20 your need for money, and that you would welcome the exposure you would get= =20 from playing this wedding.=20   Before you leave, please feel free to ask the caterer for a snack sandwich= =20 and a soda (the bottles are returnable or you can pay the deposit to the=20 butler). Please use the back entrance to avoid disturbing the guests.=20   Sincerely yours,=20 Alice Rockefeller Gates =20   I thought this was hilarious. Hope you do too. =20   Nick =20   --=20 Nicholas F. Russotto Somers, Connecticut Organist, Holy Cross PNCC Enfield, Connecticut Moderator/Owner: Monarch of Music=20 http://launch.groups.yahoo.com/group/monarch_of_music/  
(back) Subject: If Organists Wrote the Wedding Column From: "N. Russotto" <ravenrockdesigns@gmail.com> Date: Wed, 11 May 2005 19:42:44 -0400   On Saturday, the fifth of August, at well after the stated time of 2:00 P.M= ..,=20 Ann Jones and Bob Smith were married at Our Lady of Sorry Acoustics. The=20 groom wore a black suit and the bride wore a dress. The organist's shoes, i= n=20 tasteful basic black, were by Organmaster.=20   The organ is a rebuild by Harvey Piston Schotz VI of a 2m Whisk which=20 contains pipework from the original Ox tracker that existed before the=20 tragic fire. The harmonic flute is to die for and the cor anglais is like= =20 buttah, but the combination action is unreliable.=20   There were attendants all over the place, but the organist still got only= =20 3/4 of the way through "The Prince of Denmark's March" with no repeats,=20 ending in the dominant. That the 8' Tuba was the central feature of the=20 processional was obvious; this could be seen on the smiling faces of=20 everyone in attendance.=20   After a few minutes of some speaking by some clergy-type, the organist=20 played the first four phrases of the Schubert "Ave Maria" (in E-flat) on th= e=20 Gemshorn 8' while the couple did something. Later, the bride's sister's bes= t=20 friend's adopted niece breathily sang "The Wedding Song" from the balcony,= =20 without interludes. (The organist left them in.) This didn't matter because= =20 she used the microphone, obliterating the subtle chiff of the Gedeckt 8'.= =20   The recessional was the Mendelssohn, played on a satisfying plenum. It was= =20 played in ABABA form to fit the length of the movement.=20   The guests talked throughout the postlude, but the organist added stops as= =20 the noise level increased, masterfully maneuvering each drawknob, coupler,= =20 and reversible WITHOUT MISSING A SINGLE NOTE OF THE WIDOR!!! This noble fea= t=20 did not go unnoticed by the congregation, as attested to by=20 the audible sighs of relief which were heard as soon as the music stopped.= =20   The bride and groom went to college somewhere, but they did not take any=20 music appreciation courses. After their honeymoon somewhere, they plan to= =20 blend into suburbia, where the highlight of each year will undoubtedly be= =20 the replaying of their wedding video and reliving each musical moment.=20 Once again hilarious! BTW, these are posted from church-organist.com<http://church-organist.com>Thanks for the humour!     NFR   --=20 Nicholas F. Russotto Somers, Connecticut Organist, Holy Cross PNCC Enfield, Connecticut Moderator/Owner: Monarch of Music=20 http://launch.groups.yahoo.com/group/monarch_of_music/