PipeChat Digest #5336 - Saturday, May 14, 2005
 
Re: EASTERN EUROPE - POLAND
  by "Paul Valtos" <chercapa@enter.net>
Re: Conn info needed
  by <jerrym8319@aol.com>
Registering  Reger...Thanks to...
  by "Desiree'" <nicemusica@yahoo.com>
Re: Conn info needed
  by "John Vanderlee" <jovanderlee@vassar.edu>
RE: Shieling
  by "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
Re: Shieling
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Re: Shieling
  by "Jim McFarland" <mcfarland6@juno.com>
RE: Conn info needed
  by "Tom Hoehn" <thoehn@theatreorgans.com>
Re: Conn info needed
  by <JerryM8319@aol.com>
RE: Shieling
  by "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
RE: acoustical question
  by "Roger Whitehead" <roger.whitehead@AES.com>
Re: acoustical question
  by "nelson denton" <ndenton@cogeco.ca>
 

(back) Subject: Re: EASTERN EUROPE - POLAND From: "Paul Valtos" <chercapa@enter.net> Date: Fri, 13 May 2005 12:18:42 -0400   Dear Colin. I was in Cracow Poland (Southern Poland) in 97. The small village churches lack organs of any significance. My son and I tried to fire up = one but only the organist (who was not present) knew how to turn it on. It had = a blower switch but nothing happened and the priest was far from knowledgeable. In Cracow, there are many churches of cathedral size but I don't know when the organ is played except for services. At no time did we walk into a church and hear someone practicing. As far as I know (not = going into Major Poland (as Northern Poland is called) most of the organs of any importance there are in the areas of Selesia, the port of Gdansk (Danzig before WWII) and the northern corridor of East Prussia. Paul ----- Original Message ----- From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Friday, May 13, 2005 11:27 AM Subject: EASTERN EUROPE - POLAND     > Hello, > > There are seminal moments in life! > > Just when I was getting slightly bored, I stumbled > into East European organ culture....... all very > historic and interesting........then I hit POLAND!! > > I "thought" I knew a bit about organs and > organ-history, but have now decided that I know > absolutely nothing at all. I suppose I was grounded in > those delightful books about "modern organ > building",(Herber Norman) or Sumner's "The organ" and > all the rest, which are usually very interesting, but > have seldom mentioned a great deal about what we now > know as Eastern Europe, unless the area was somehow > connected with Bach or Silbermann. > > I've probably been quite naive, if not a little > foolish....I mean, Poland is just a flat place with a > bit of ship-building around Gdansk...isn't it? > > The fact that the last Pope came from Poland, might > reasonably have alerted me to the fact that religion > is sort of "live and kicking" there, but I'd assumed > that they probably just sang old hymns based on old > Polish folk-songs and sprinkled themselves with holy > water every day. It's a backward, poor country and the > shoes they made were terrible during the communist > years; usually falling apart within weeks. Then there > were those awful Polski-Fiat autos, which broke down > every day or just refused to start, as rust visibly > spread as you watched. > > Well Poland may be a relatively poor country, and one > which has been held back by grinding communism and a > lack of development, but when it comes to organs, they > have the lot! > > Not only is there a very substantial history, with > truly world-heritage instruments (and especially > organ-cases), the number of organs built during the > 19th century was remarkable. Things have obvioulsy > been quite eventful too, and one comes across > delightful references to the fact that an organ "is > now in Sweden, after the invading army stole it!" I > don't know whether they had organs melted down for tin > or lead (bullets) as they did in Hungary, where only > instruments prior to 1850 were spared officially, (a > lot somehow survived), but Poland has certainly had > more than her fair share of troubles, invasion, > warfare and oppression. > > It is quite likely (though I have no evidence for > saying this) that organ-building in Poland has > probably suffered like it did in the Czechoslovak > communist regime, with lots of nationalisation, poor > quality components and an "iron fist" control from the > authorities. Nevertheless, even if I come across this > sort of evidence, the fact is, there have been a large > number of new organs built in Poland, and still > continue to be built because religion is quite a big > thing there. > > I also find that there are fine performers, fine > academies, organ-festivals, real organ composers and > instruments which spread across the ages, from the > 16th century, through the baroque and romantic and > right up to the present day. > > Here is a fascinating URL, which gives an insight into > the scale of the organ industry in Poland. > > http://www.zych.com/ > > Only established in 1967, and only then building their > first new organ in 1975, Zych have since built a large > number of instruments; some of them quite monumental. > The URL is fascinating, for not only does it contain a > very good English version of things, it has many, many > photographs and, under the heading of "recorders", > many audio mp3's of their work. Most of the other > organ-builders do not have web-sites, and in fact, it > is quite difficult to "fire up" the links to some of > the URL's in Poland; such is the lack of speed on many > internet connections. > > I now face an enormous problem, for not only am I > struggling on with the Hungarian language and organ > tradition, and collecting a huge amount of data from > the Czech and Slovak regions, I now find a HUGE amount > of organ related material from a country with an even > MORE obscure language. Working out what the computer > generated translations actually MEAN, is a bit like > doing the London "Times" crossword; but the "blunder > egg" is still a marvel of machine translation which > defeats my imagination. > > As a visual feast, I reckon that Poland has some of > the most fantastic old organ cases on the planet, and > I would recommend a bit of time to take a look at > them. > > More later! > > It should be fun trying to discover the history of the > huge 110-stop, 5 manual organ at Gdansk, and if that > doesn't sound ALL that large, do please keep in mind > the fact that in Eastern Europe, a unit organ is > virtually unknown, and with BIG churches requiring BIG > mixtures, I reckon that at Gdansk, we may be looking > at 160+ ranks and about 9,000 pipes. > > Regards, > > Colin Mitchell UK > > > > > > > > > > > > __________________________________________________ > Do You Yahoo!? > Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around > http://mail.yahoo.com > > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> >    
(back) Subject: Re: Conn info needed From: <jerrym8319@aol.com> Date: Fri, 13 May 2005 12:19:24 -0400   Big difference between a 645 and 646. The 645 was introduced around 1966 = and is a tube model 2 manual 32 note AGO pedalboard theatre organ. I have = the specs and it would be easier for me to send you a copy of them. Let me = know. Jerry -----Original Message----- From: John Vanderlee <jovanderlee@vassar.edu> To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Fri, 13 May 2005 10:42:51 -0700 Subject: Conn info needed     Hi, I am back to my favorite lists with a question: Does anyone have the specs for a Conn Model 645 Deluxe? Best I have been = able to find is a 646. how different is that model? As Always, many thanks in advance! John V ****************************************************************** "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org>  
(back) Subject: Registering Reger...Thanks to... From: "Desiree'" <nicemusica@yahoo.com> Date: Fri, 13 May 2005 11:34:03 -0700 (PDT)   A cordial thanks to a lister who kindly put me in touch with David Cox, of = Maxreger.com, regarding Reger. Very kind of you to do so, with an extra = foot forward. It was a good lead. TDH   --------------------------------- Yahoo! Mail Mobile Take Yahoo! Mail with you! Check email on your mobile phone.
(back) Subject: Re: Conn info needed From: "John Vanderlee" <jovanderlee@vassar.edu> Date: Fri, 13 May 2005 14:25:49 -0700   >Big difference between a 645 and 646. The 645 was introduced around >1966 and is a tube model 2 manual 32 note AGO pedalboard theatre >organ. I have the specs and it would be easier for me to send you a >copy of them. Let me know. Jerry   Thank you,   I would apprciate it to my private email.   thanks!   John V --  
(back) Subject: RE: Shieling From: "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Sat, 14 May 2005 07:46:06 +1200   >I believe "shilling" would be a false cognate.   No connection at all between shilling and shieling: the writer of that was making a joke.   >"Shieling" usually refers to a patch of grass dedicated to grazing = cattle, or a hermitage erected on such a scrap of land.   You've got it wrong. A shieling officially is a hut high in the hills in = the Highlands of Scotland. The shepherd lives in this during the summer, as he has driven his flock = up for summer pasture.   >Does the holder of this screen name live such a spare existence, or do they merely graze while chatting = us up?   "The Shieling" has become a common house name in Scotland, and also gets attached to caravans, B&Bs, motels, etc. on the flat. Here in NZ, the word is virtually unknown.   The word perhaps became best known in the 19thC poem called the Canadian boat song, of which the following is the first verse - From the lone shieling on the misty island mountains divide us, and the waste of seas - yet still the blood is strong, the heart is Highland, and we in dreams behold the Hebrides.   So, the poem has become a part of those who for whatever reason have left Scotland and yearn to return to their native land.   The answer is: as a retired vicar (clergyman are often known as shepherds = of the flock) I have named my retirement house "The Shieling", though with = its electricity and draught-proof walls it's unimagninably better than most of the old shielings would have been.   Ross    
(back) Subject: Re: Shieling From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Fri, 13 May 2005 15:48:05 EDT     In a message dated 05/13/05 3:41:43 PM, TheShieling@xtra.co.nz writes:   << You've got it wrong. >>   Okay. Then I'll burn my copy of the Oxford English Dictionary. And to = think I ever trusted that drivel.  
(back) Subject: Re: Shieling From: "Jim McFarland" <mcfarland6@juno.com> Date: Fri, 13 May 2005 16:14:34 -0400       Sebastian and Ross:   You both have it right.   I am of Scottish descent and know the word well. It is sometimes spelled "sheeling". Sebastian's definition does not pick up on the fact that it has a place connotation. For a shepherd's hut, it must be on or near the grazing land, for a fisherman it must be on or near the wharf, for a hunter the location must be at the hunting ground.   The OED seems to indicate the more common and looser definition of this word, that Robby Burns lovers know so well to be a bit more specific. After all, common usage is what defines a word and makes it part of our language.   Basically though, I see no difference in your respective understandings of the word.   Jim         On Fri, 13 May 2005 15:48:05 EDT TubaMagna@aol.com writes: > > In a message dated 05/13/05 3:41:43 PM, TheShieling@xtra.co.nz > writes: > > << You've got it wrong. >> > > Okay. Then I'll burn my copy of the Oxford English Dictionary. And > to think I > ever trusted that drivel. > > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related > topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> > > >  
(back) Subject: RE: Conn info needed From: "Tom Hoehn" <thoehn@theatreorgans.com> Date: Fri, 13 May 2005 17:36:30 -0400   John --=20   Conn 645 pre-dated the 646 by many years. Both are 2x61 manuals and 32 = AGO pedals. The 645 came out in the 60's the 646 in the late 70's early = 80's after Kimball got a hold of Conn. The 645 specification is very = close to the other 2m Theatre models with the addition of pistons = (non-settable), a 1' fife in the solo and either 1 or 2 expression = shoes. Overall a very warm sounding instrument (I wish I had mine = back), Don Baker recorded several albums for Conn using that instrument = and I believe the he Conn Organ album is also on this model. Hope this = helps   Tom Hoehn, Organist Roaring 20's Pizza & Pipes, Ellenton, FL (substitute - 4/42 Wurlitzer) First United Methodist Church, Clearwater, FL (4/9?- = Rodgers/Ruffati/Wicks) Manasota/OATOS/HiloBay/CIC-ATOS/VotS-ATOS/DTOS http://theatreorgans.com/tomhoehn http://launch.groups.yahoo.com/group/TOUploads/   > -----Original Message----- > From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org]On Behalf Of > John Vanderlee > Sent: Friday, May 13, 2005 1:43 PM > To: PipeChat > Subject: Conn info needed >=20 >=20 > Hi, I am back to my favorite lists with a question: >=20 > Does anyone have the specs for a Conn Model 645 Deluxe? Best I have=20 > been able to find is a 646. how different is that model? >=20 > As Always, many thanks in advance! >=20 > John V >=20 > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> >=20 >=20    
(back) Subject: Re: Conn info needed From: <JerryM8319@aol.com> Date: Fri, 13 May 2005 17:42:33 EDT   Tom is wrong. The 646 only has a flat 25 note pedalboard. The 645 is an = AGO 32 note pedalboard. I'm having a 645 delivered next week. Jerry  
(back) Subject: RE: Shieling From: "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Sat, 14 May 2005 16:35:09 +1200   >Okay. Then I'll burn my copy of the Oxford English Dictionary. And to = think I ever trusted that drivel.   Be my guest. Just remember that if you're using a Scots word, a Scots dictionary is more likely to be accurate than an English one.   SHIELING - a rough, sometimes temporary, hut or shelter used by people looking after animals on high or remote ground. [Collins Scots = Dictionary, Glasgow, 1995]   SHIELING - A hut for those who have the care of sheep or cattle. = [Dictionary of the Scottish Language, Edinburgh, 1866 & 1895]   And according to my Oxford (1933 edition, p.1873) a shieling is either a piece of pasture to which cattle may be driven for grazing, or a hut of rough construction erected on or near such a piece of pasture.   The word is ultimately from either Middle English or Icelandic, sources = vary in their attribution, but even the OED says it has been Scottish noting a 1568 reference, so it will go back a long way before that. I have never heard of the OED suggestion of it being for the land itself - it is always for the hut/cottage.   I could supply you with another dozen references to the meaning I have = used, but forebear. Ross        
(back) Subject: RE: acoustical question From: "Roger Whitehead" <roger.whitehead@AES.com> Date: Sat, 14 May 2005 04:55:40 -0000   In=20one=20of=20yesterday's=20digests,=20scot=20wrote: "we=20have=20a=203-manual=20organ,=20each=20manual=20in=20its=20own=20expr= ession=20chamber=20at=20the=20rear=20of=20the=20chancel."   Doesn't=20that=20make=20it=20quite=20hard=20to=20play?=20Most=20organs=20h= ave=20the=20manuals=20together=20in=20a=20console.=20<VBG>         ________________________________________________________________________ This=20communication=20is=20for=20use=20by=20the=20intended=20recipient=20= and=20contains=20information=20that=20may=20be=20privileged,=20confidentia= l=20or=20copyrighted=20under=20law.=20If=20you=20are=20not=20the=20intende= d=20recipient,=20you=20are=20hereby=20formally=20notified=20that=20any=20u= se,=20copying=20or=20distribution=20of=20this=20e-Mail,=20in=20whole=20or=20= in=20part,=20is=20strictly=20prohibited.=20Please=20notify=20the=20sender=20= by=20return=20e-Mail=20and=20delete=20this=20e-Mail=20from=20your=20system= ..=20Unless=20explicitly=20and=20conspicuously=20stated=20in=20the=20subjec= t=20matter=20of=20the=20above=20e-Mail,=20this=20e-Mail=20does=20not=20con= stitute=20a=20contract=20offer,=20a=20contract=20amendment,=20or=20an=20ac= ceptance=20of=20a=20contract=20offer.=20This=20e-Mail=20does=20not=20const= itute=20consent=20to=20the=20use=20of=20sender's=20contact=20information=20= for=20direct=20marketing=20purposes=20or=20for=20transfers=20of=20data=20t= o=20third=20parties.   This=20email=20has=20been=20scanned=20for=20all=20viruses=20by=20the=20Mes= sageLabs=20service.  
(back) Subject: Re: acoustical question From: "nelson denton" <ndenton@cogeco.ca> Date: Sat, 14 May 2005 04:33:11 -0400       >In one of yesterday's digests, scot wrote: >"we have a 3-manual organ, each manual in its own expression chamber at = the >rear of the chancel."   >Doesn't that make it quite hard to play? Most organs have the manuals >together in a console. <VBG>     Naw! That organ is for organists with split personalities   Nelson ( in a very bad mood tonight!)