PipeChat Digest #5341 - Monday, May 16, 2005
 
No plain text part?
  by <RMB10@aol.com>
Re: EASTERN EUROPE - POLAND
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: Titles
  by "Emily Adams" <eadams@cinci.rr.com>
Re: No plain text part?
  by "Administrator" <admin@pipechat.org>
Re: Titles
  by "Administrator" <admin@pipechat.org>
Re: pedal reeds and a 1960 Moeller - what were they thinking?
  by <RMaryman@aol.com>
Would like to talk to someone that knows about Electronic carillons
  by "Channing Ashbaugh" <channinga@carolina.rr.com>
Questions About Organs
  by "Channing Ashbaugh" <channinga@carolina.rr.com>
Re: Disregarding the composer's directions
  by "Charles & Maria DeVita-Krug" <cdkrug@worldnet.att.net>
Questions I have about carillons
  by "Channing Ashbaugh" <channinga@carolina.rr.com>
Re: Questions About Organs
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
Re: pedal reeds and a 1960 Moeller
  by "Mattcinnj" <mattcinnj@yahoo.com>
Sunday, May 15
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
Rollschweller and cone valve chests.
  by "jlinger@snet.net" <jlinger@aya.yale.edu>
Multiculti Pentecost -- Tower of Babel?
  by <SWF12262@aol.com>
Re: Rollschweller and cone valve chests.
  by "Paul Smith" <kipsmith@getgoin.net>
 

(back) Subject: No plain text part? From: <RMB10@aol.com> Date: Sun, 15 May 2005 05:33:05 EDT   I get my Pipe Chats as digests, but once every couple of days, several messages come through with the message, "Could not copy the message to the = digest, there was no plain text part." Why does this happen? If we're all = posting in plain text, it shouldn't happen, should it? Sometimes, I'm able to pick = up on the message when it's been requoted in a later post, but sometimes it's = never requoted at all. What's the deal? How can I read or access these = messages?     Thanks!   Monty Bennett  
(back) Subject: Re: EASTERN EUROPE - POLAND From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Sun, 15 May 2005 03:03:06 -0700 (PDT)   Hello,   Thanks to Paul for that information, which is the sort of inside knowledge the local organ enthusiasts don't mention.   I suspect that in the country areas of Poland, there aren't many organists on the ground. This means that the information supplied to the web sites dedicated to organ matters, often have incomplete information sent in by local musicians.   Paul's comment about the pifering of instruments goes some way towards explaining the line "Organs doesn't exist."   I have built up a reasonable picture thus far, but more interestingly, I have also discovered some very good mp3 recordings (for free) which demonstrate some of the instruments.   That said, some of the organ-cases are absolute treasures, and must qualify as some of the most beautiful anywhere in the world.   I wonder how many people know that some of the carved figures in the fabulous organ-case of the 5-manual at Gdansk (Danzig) were made to move!   Are there any others in the world which do the same?   Regards,   Colin MItchell UK     --- Paul Valtos <chercapa@enter.net> wrote:   > Dear Colin, > Many of the organs in the churches of the > Polish villages are in > disrepair or the pipes were stolen by robbers of the > Nazis during WWII.     Yahoo! Mail Stay connected, organized, and protected. Take the tour: http://tour.mail.yahoo.com/mailtour.html    
(back) Subject: Re: Titles From: "Emily Adams" <eadams@cinci.rr.com> Date: Sun, 15 May 2005 07:15:37 -0400   From Monty: "I always try to call a work by it's proper title or it's translation... If a piece such as a chorale prelude is some obscure chorale, that nobody = in the congregation is going to know, like Nun Bitten Wir, I will use an English translation, = such as We Pray Now to the Holy Spirit. Sometimes, I will use the German title =   first, with the English in parenthesis."   Nun Bitten Wir might be obscure and unknown to your congregation, but = that's hardly the case with mine! Nonetheless, when I play a composition based on = a German tune--as I do regularly--I list the title as translated in the hymnal, with a reference to the number in the event anyone wants to have a =   look at the text. Using the German strikes me as a waste of valuable bulletin space, especially since the German speakers in my congregation number no more than a handful. I'd use the German on a recital program in the interest of scholarly authenticity, but even there I'd offer people a translation.   Monty, I can't help but notice the tone of your replies to Desiree. People =   who live in glass houses shouldn't throw stones. The possessive form of = "it" doesn't take an apostrophe. What you've written above is the contraction = for "it is." I mention this as constructive criticism and hope you'll take it = in that vein.    
(back) Subject: Re: No plain text part? From: "Administrator" <admin@pipechat.org> Date: Sun, 15 May 2005 06:57:09 -0500   >I get my Pipe Chats as digests, but once every couple of days, several >messages come through with the message, "Could not copy the message >to the digest, >there was no plain text part." Why does this happen? If we're all = posting in >plain text, it shouldn't happen, should it? Sometimes, I'm able to pick = up on >the message when it's been requoted in a later post, but sometimes it's = never >requoted at all. What's the deal? How can I read or access these = messages?   This happens because the person that sent the email sends it only as an "formatted" email - their email client is not sending a Plain Text part to the email.   Again, I make the plea to EVERYONE on the list - when you send to the list please send in Plain Text only. Most email clients are set up to be able to send in Plain Text Only, you just need to find the setting within your program to do it. Luckily, the Digest does strip out all the extraneous formatting and only uses the Plain Text part of an email but the formatted part does get sent out to those people that receive their mail as Individual posts. And all the "goobly-gook" that happens in formatted mail does tend to fill up peoples mailboxes faster than the Plain Text does.   David -- **************************************** David Scribner Owner / Co-Administrator PipeChat   http://www.pipechat.org mailto:admin@pipechat.org  
(back) Subject: Re: Titles From: "Administrator" <admin@pipechat.org> Date: Sun, 15 May 2005 07:04:11 -0500   At 7:15 AM -0400 5/15/05, Emily Adams wrote: >Monty, I can't help but notice the tone of your replies to Desiree. >People who live in glass houses shouldn't throw stones. The >possessive form of "it" doesn't take an apostrophe. What you've >written above is the contraction for "it is." I mention this as >constructive criticism and hope you'll take it in that vein.   Folks   This list is not the place to give grammar corrections, etc. or to comment publicly about one person's attitude towards another list member. If you have problems with a list member please send your concerns to the Administrators and allow us to deal with the problem. Do Not take it to the list.   All of you might be surprised at how much problem handling Tim and I do without the whole list knowing about it. And that is the way it should be.   It might be a good idea for everyone on this list to read through the List Guidelines once in awhile - they are located at: http://www.pipechat.org/netiquet.html   David -- **************************************** David Scribner Owner / Co-Administrator PipeChat   http://www.pipechat.org mailto:admin@pipechat.org  
(back) Subject: Re: pedal reeds and a 1960 Moeller - what were they thinking? From: <RMaryman@aol.com> Date: Sun, 15 May 2005 09:00:22 EDT   In a message dated 5/14/2005 10:10:45 PM Eastern Standard Time, Beau.Surratt@theatreorgans.com writes: This Moeller also has that lovely phenomenon of what I call the "great American reed chorus" on the swell, a 16' Bassoon (which is more an English horn than anything else), an 8' trompette, and a 4' Hautbois. What were they thinking??? given that this is an educational venue, it is more than likely that the organ was not really designed by Moller (tho it IS possible, just = unlikely)...and whoever did disign the organ probably had been brought up with a different =   ethos regarding organs and what they should be comprised of. We do have = the advantage of looking backwards with (a slight bit of) a more informed = historical model of organs and how they relate to the literature, but in the period = of american organ building from the late 1920's thru the early 1970's most of = the major builders in the US were building what the customer ordered (or in = some cases a stock model with customer 'tweaks').   Rick in VA  
(back) Subject: Would like to talk to someone that knows about Electronic carillons From: "Channing Ashbaugh" <channinga@carolina.rr.com> Date: Sun, 15 May 2005 12:24:44 -0400   Hello everyone,     I would like to talk to someone that knows about electronic carillons if = you can tal to me e-mail me at channing28270@yahoo.com   channing
(back) Subject: Questions About Organs From: "Channing Ashbaugh" <channinga@carolina.rr.com> Date: Sun, 15 May 2005 12:30:23 -0400   Hello,     I have some questions about organs my questions about Organs are:   1. Does a Theatere organ have pipes? 2. What is the difference between a Theatere Organ and a Pipe Organ? 3. What do the white knobs of a Theatere Organ do? 4. What do the white knobs of a Pipe organ do? 5. Is the theatere Organs white knobs similar to a symphony like on a = Pipe organ or a church organ where there is Chimes, Violin, Flute, = chello etc...?   If you know the answers e-mail me at channing28270@yahoo.com     channing
(back) Subject: Re: Disregarding the composer's directions From: "Charles & Maria DeVita-Krug" <cdkrug@worldnet.att.net> Date: Sun, 15 May 2005 12:52:06 -0400   On Sat, May 14, 2005 at 07:31:19PM -0400, TubaMagna@aol.com wrote: > We're discussing the act of sitting down to an instrument with the > proper resources, with a clearly marked score,   As soon as I'm in THAT happy position . . . (-8      
(back) Subject: Questions I have about carillons From: "Channing Ashbaugh" <channinga@carolina.rr.com> Date: Sun, 15 May 2005 12:36:10 -0400   Hello,   I have some quesitons about carillons:   1. I have noticed in electonic carillon music there is a bell sound that = makes the keyboard sound like an organ console which is the Harp = Bells-Is there such thing as a bell that is shaped like a harp?=20 2. Is there such thing as an organ console type keyboard that has wires = that leads to several boxes of metal rods? 3. what are metal rods made out of? 4. do metal companys like Alleghany Allvac make the metal rods that go = in to electronic carillons?   if you know the answers please e-mail me at channing28270@yahoo.com   channing
(back) Subject: Re: Questions About Organs From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Sun, 15 May 2005 13:40:14 EDT   Dear Channing:   Both Theatre and classic pipe organs have pipes. The difference is, the Theatre organ depends upon unification or stops played at more than one pitch and on two or more manuals. The pipes in a small one are usually housed in a main swell chamber, larger ones may contain special high pressure reeds and other stops in a Solo Chamber. One of the largest Wurlitzers is in the home of Sanfilipiano, in Illinois, in a five story high theatre built as an annex to his home. It's unusual in that it contains 80 plus ranks and is twice as large as any original work by Wurlitzer. David Junction developed the plans from broken up Wurlitzer organs.   Theatre organs contain no white knobs they are all stop key in simi circular jams. Classic pipe organs can have draw knobs but not always. Some use rocker tabs, and other types of stop controls. If you mean white knobs under each manual, those are set able controls to select stops while playing to change registrations on the fly.   Theatre organs are unit orchestras, foundations based on Tibias 16' to 1' Strings reeds and other big flutes and high wind pressures. Church organ foundations are based upon Principals or Diapasons independent stops 16 '8' 4' 2 2/3' 2' and Mixtures reinforcing natural harmonics, reeds, strings, and flutes and mostly lower wind pressures.   Electronic Percussions like Chimes can be made of amplified bars or digitally sampled tube chimes. Some have consoles of there own and others are directly played on one or more of the organ manuals.   I just have to ask this, are you a home schooled teenager? Reason: It's the way you form your questions almost as if you are at square one.   Couldn't resist asking,   Ron Severin    
(back) Subject: Re: pedal reeds and a 1960 Moeller From: "Mattcinnj" <mattcinnj@yahoo.com> Date: Sun, 15 May 2005 14:31:26 -0700 (PDT)   Hi Folks, We have a new, large Jaeckle 3 manual in the Porter Center of Brevard, NC. = BTW Brevard is in Transylvania County NC, I had exactly the same reaction when I heard this organ's 16' Posaune = last year, so the example given below is not unique. It has 30 pipes of = 26%, Tin Resonators. There also is a 32' Contrabombarde (30 pipes wooden = Resonators) and a Bombarde 16' listed as having 18 pipes from the 32 = Contrabombarde, along with 12 pipes having 50% Tin Resonators. Matt   Beau Surratt <Beau.Surratt@theatreorgans.com> wrote: Hi! Thanks to Monty for mentioning the large amount of foundation tone contained in a good wooden 16' Posaune. If anyone listens to any of David Schrader's Bach recordings, you've heard the phenomenal 16' Posaune on the Jaeckel organ at Salem Lutheran Church in Wasuau, WI. It sounds like that's the only stop he has on in the pedal- it is such a rich penetrating tone, and not all overpowering.     __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around http://mail.yahoo.com
(back) Subject: Sunday, May 15 From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Sun, 15 May 2005 20:10:55 -0500   I know I haven't reported about last weekend with Carlo Curley, Atlanta, Alan Morrison and the organ I played. But I came home from Atlanta with a severe sinus infection, and missed two days of work. Now that I'm in the private sector, that means money out of my pocket, and I had to catch up. Besides, I was suddenly armed with mucho inspiration to add to the Atlanta novel, and one has to write that stuff while it is still in the head.   But I must at least give kudos to my friend Paul Shimel, who played his senior recital this afternoon at Christ Church Pensacola. He was nervous, because it was his first recital, but he acquitted himself well. His program:   Prologue from A Wartime Sketchbook - Walton Air for violin and piano - Howells Trumpet Tune (for Flor Peeters) - David Johnson Rhosymedre - Vaughan Williams Sonata IV in B-flat - Mendelssohn Two Pieces (Neuf Pieces): Dans une douce joie and Chant de Paix - Langlais Prelude and Fugue in E-flat - Bach   Paul is a tax accountant for Gulf Power. He graduated from college the same year I did (we'll leave out the date). He is a student of Lynne Lauderdale and Ken Karadin. He works full time, plus is assistant organist at Christ Church, and just obtained his Bachelors in Organ Performance and in Systems Science from UWF, while assisting his gifted children in pursuing their award-winning. His 16-year old son just won a regional piano competition and played the Bach B-flat prelude and fugue for postlude today at Youth Sunday at Christ Church.   The nerve of some people - finding that much energy and drive to accomplish so much. I'm just now figuring out how to be a real attorney after 19 years of practicing. Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com (who after attending two services today still had to listen to the Todd Wilson CD to get her fill of Durufle)          
(back) Subject: Rollschweller and cone valve chests. From: "jlinger@snet.net" <jlinger@aya.yale.edu> Date: Sun, 15 May 2005 21:53:16 -0400   I would like to hear more explantion from Colin as to why/how the rollschwellerworks so well with the cone valve chest to go from a whisper = to a roar, and why the cresc pedal doesnt doesnt.   As an aside to the topic, the cresc pedal on the Newberry Organ at Yale was designed by Jepson according to his interpretation of Reger. Jepson oversaw all three installations of the organ (1903, 1915, 1928). Given those dates, he could have studied in Germany while Reger and Straube were doing their thing.     Joe Linger 460 Central Ave New Haven, CT 06515-2208   http://linger.dyndns.org    
(back) Subject: Multiculti Pentecost -- Tower of Babel? From: <SWF12262@aol.com> Date: Sun, 15 May 2005 22:32:43 EDT   Here's the lineup for our multicultural Pentecost celebration at St. = Lambert: PRELUDE: Improvisation on Down Ampney (Incorporating Malcolm Archer's setting from "After the Last Verse" PROCESSIONAL: Come, Holy Ghost (Veni Creator, with descant by yours = truly and improvised interludes between the stanzas -- loooooong procession with = three choirs and representatives of various cutlures in ethnic costume) KYRIE: Senior Piedad (Sung in Spanish) GLORIA: Papuri sa Diyos (Sung in Tagalog) [First reading proclaimed in English] RESPONSORIAL PSALM: Proper of the day (Owen Alstott) [Second reading proclaimed in French] SEQUENCE: Veni Sancte Spiritus (chanted a cappella in Latin; TB unison on =   odd stanzas; tutti + congregation on even stanzas with AT singing organum) GOSPEL ACCLAMATION: Proper of the day (O. Asltott) PRAYERS OF THE FAITHFUL: Petitions read in Polish, German, French, = Tagalog, Spanish, Chinese, Arabic, Ibo, and English -- English translations of = each in program; response to each "Lord, hear our prayer" -- Byzantine Rite = chant OFFERTORY ANTHEM: Cantique de Jean Racine (Gabriel Faure) sung in French EUCHARISTIC ACCLAMATIONS: A Community Mass (Richard Proulx) LORD'S PRAYER and DOXOLOGY: Traditional Chant AGNUS DEI: Cordero (sung in Spanish) COMMUNION HYMN: Come Down, O Love Divine (Down Ampney) COMMUNION ANTHEM: Komm, heiliger Geist, Herre Gott (Zachau -- from the = 80 Chorale Preludes -- Peters; choir sang CF of the prelude while I played = the other two voices on separate manuals) in German RETIRING PROCESSION and POSTLUDE: Laudate Dominum (Jacques Berthier -- Taize Community) Latin ostinato refrain with English choir verses -- = Paschal candle carried out in retiring procession I was very proud of my mostly Filipino choir wrapping their mouth around = the French and German! Life in a multiethnic parish is certainly = interesting! Three cheers for our tower of Babel! ;)) Ako ay pagod (Tagalog for I am tired -- don't know how to say SOOO glad tomorrow is my day off!) Exhaustedly, Steve Steven Weyand Folkers St. Lambert RC Church Skokie, IL USA  
(back) Subject: Re: Rollschweller and cone valve chests. From: "Paul Smith" <kipsmith@getgoin.net> Date: Sun, 15 May 2005 21:35:43 -0500   In my very limited experience, either a crescendo pedal or a rollschweller =   would not give a very musical effect with ventil chests. When a ventil = chest rank is switched on while notes are being held, it takes a moment for pressure to build up to normal in that section of the chest, and the pipes =   will start to sound before they have full wind pressure to them, and the effect is not smooth or musical. Even more noticable is when a rank is switched off while the notes are being held. The pressure drops off suddenly, leaving the pipes sounding saggy or choked. If you are hand registering, you can choose the exact moment at which the registration change can be made. But with either foot device, the exact moment for each =   contact is vague, and making awkward changes on a ventil chest is unavoidable.   I too am curious why the effect of a rollschweller is different from that = of a crescendo pedal. And why the cone chest is different from our pouch-type =   electro-pneumatics. ----- Original Message ----- From: "jlinger@snet.net" <jlinger@aya.yale.edu> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Sunday, May 15, 2005 8:53 PM Subject: Rollschweller and cone valve chests.     >I would like to hear more explantion from Colin as to why/how the > rollschwellerworks so well with the cone valve chest to go from a = whisper > to > a roar, and why the cresc pedal doesnt doesnt. > > As an aside to the topic, the cresc pedal on the Newberry Organ at = Yale > was designed by Jepson according to his interpretation of Reger. Jepson > oversaw all three installations of the organ (1903, 1915, 1928). Given > those dates, he could have studied in Germany while Reger and Straube = were > doing their thing. > > > Joe Linger > 460 Central Ave > New Haven, CT 06515-2208 > > http://linger.dyndns.org > > > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> > > >