PipeChat Digest #5344 - Tuesday, May 17, 2005
 
Sicilian Organs
  by "John Foss" <harkat@kat.forthnet.gr>
Sauer organ
  by "Dennis Steckley" <kzrev@rr1.net>
Re: Sauer organ
  by "Jim McFarland" <mcfarland6@juno.com>
Re: Casavant Actions and more
  by "Jim McFarland" <mcfarland6@juno.com>
Re: pedal reeds and a 1960 Moeller - what were they thinking?
  by <Steskinner@aol.com>
Tamburini in Messina
  by <RMB10@aol.com>
Registering Trio Sonatas
  by "terry hicks" <Terrick@webtv.net>
Re: Sauer organ
  by "Paul Valtos" <chercapa@enter.net>
Re: Registering Trio Sonatas
  by "Beau Surratt" <Beau.Surratt@theatreorgans.com>
RE: Registering Trio Sonatas
  by "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
Reger and cone valves
  by "jlinger@snet.net" <jlinger@aya.yale.edu>
Re: pedal reeds and a 1960 Moeller - what were they thinking?
  by "Beau Surratt" <Beau.Surratt@theatreorgans.com>
RE: big bashing
  by "jlinger@snet.net" <jlinger@aya.yale.edu>
Re: Registering Trio Sonatas
  by "Thomas Dressler" <rgtd@ptdprolog.net>
The Newberry
  by "Nathan Smith" <erzahler@sbcglobal.net>
This week's Mp3s (3 of 'em!)
  by "Jonathan Orwig" <giwro@adelphia.net>
Re: Sauer organ
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: Reger and cone valves
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
RE: big bashing
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
RE: Registering Trio Sonatas
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
 

(back) Subject: Sicilian Organs From: "John Foss" <harkat@kat.forthnet.gr> Date: Mon, 16 May 2005 22:11:26 +0300   Adivds@aol.com wrote "I'm going to Sicily next month, does anyone know of any organs worth visiting on the East End of the island?"   Sicily is not vey big. Benedict was born in Palermo. There is a 6 manual Ruffati in the Cathedral of Monreale, an extension really of Palermo. "Imposing with its length of one hundred metres, magnificent with its = apses decorated as blind arches, Monreale Cathedral reveals all its magnificence =   inside....." There is a photo of the console on the Ruffati site http://www.ruffatti.com/worldwide.htm Benedict, who is now 12, has to make do with the organ in my house, but I know one of his ambitions is to play this instrument. If you get there and =   manage to play it, please tell us about it!   Incidentally I see no reason why we should not express our pleasure at outstandingly good posts - I thought Colin's post on Reger and turn of the =   century organs quite fascinating - the architecture of the period as represented by the Jahrhunderthalle zu Breslau and the photo of the = console and the interior of the hall brought to mind one of the best computer = games I have ever played - not that I have played many - Syberia. The recordings =   were interesting too, though I don't think it does the Reger Pastorale justice - if it is Reger himself playing this would be understandable as = it would be a fairly old recording.   I'd forgotten about Brindley and Foster - there are not many of their instruments left. I played for a wedding at The Sacred Heart RC Church in Kilburn, which had some interesting stop transformer devices, but was not = in very good condition. This was some years ago so what it is like now I have =   no idea. I hadn't realised they used the relatively complex cone valve chests., but it would explain the interesting stop controls. They used ceramic stop knobs, a bit like taking afternoon tea. Both these organ were =   getting on in years, even forty years ago, but they had not been altered. The most interesting one I played was in the Catholic Apostolic Church = near the canal in Regent's Park, Little Venice, London. I used to moor my 60ft narrow boat up there, alongside Richard Branson. He had a 14' beam house boat there - but his remained stationary whereas mine was mobile! This was = a fine building - it is probably still there - another religious sect with = an unusual foundation. http://www.mansfieldtraquair.org.uk/cac.htm The = church which is now used by London University, Christ the King, Gordon Square was =   another of their foundations cathedral like buildings.   Since it is home of lost people week, has anyone seen or heard from Tim Grenz? Sorry we haven't got an O & O O update online this week - this is why! But it may be that my ISP is blocking all my incoming mail except the =   Viagra Adverts.....   John Foss http://www.organsandorganistsonline.com/about.htm http://launch.groups.yahoo.com/group/orgofftop/      
(back) Subject: Sauer organ From: "Dennis Steckley" <kzrev@rr1.net> Date: Mon, 16 May 2005 14:19:19 -0500   I love the online translators-here's one paragraph about the Sauer organ: Scarcely 25 years after the inauguration of the organ one decided to convert and again increase the instrument. In the year 1937 the organ received 20 further registers. In this form the instrument existed until the Second World War. 1946 were broken off it and the material on three "new" organs was divided. The largest part - approximately 85 registers - was spent in the Breslauer cathedral. There today still some voices from the once largest organ of the world are to be heard. The original klangreichtum of the sour organ is however lost on always and can on historical photographs from the time before 1946 be only suspected. Dennis Steckley For I am possessed of a cat, surpassing in beauty, from whom I take occasion to bless Almighty God.  
(back) Subject: Re: Sauer organ From: "Jim McFarland" <mcfarland6@juno.com> Date: Mon, 16 May 2005 16:05:07 -0400   Dennis:   Have you tried the translators on Cavaille-Coll instruments.   You havn'e lived until you have played "the Bee on the main thing."   Jim   On Mon, 16 May 2005 14:19:19 -0500 "Dennis Steckley" <kzrev@rr1.net> writes: I love the online translators=97here=92s one paragraph about the Sauer = organ: Scarcely 25 years after the inauguration of the organ one decided to convert and again increase the instrument. In the year 1937 the organ received 20 further registers. In this form the instrument existed until the Second World War. 1946 were broken off it and the material on three "new" organs was divided. The largest part - approximately 85 registers - was spent in the Breslauer cathedral. There today still some voices from the once largest organ of the world are to be heard. The original klangreichtum of the sour organ is however lost on always and can on historical photographs from the time before 1946 be only suspected. Dennis Steckley For I am possessed of a cat, surpassing in beauty, from whom I take occasion to bless Almighty God.
(back) Subject: Re: Casavant Actions and more From: "Jim McFarland" <mcfarland6@juno.com> Date: Mon, 16 May 2005 16:30:38 -0400     On Sun, 8 May 2005 23:17:56 -0400 Nathan Smith <erzahler@sbcglobal.net> writes: >What happened to the good old Zinc anyway???   Nathan:   The ore extraction processed changed. Formerly a smelting operation, it has become an electrolytic process. Really changes things. The commercial users of zinc prefer the malleability of the newer zinc. There is some "good" zinc available in Germany. Very pricey.           > but it didn't seem to be > anywhere > near as tough as new CPL.   I assume you are speaking of Chrome Tanned Hair Sheep? CPL is a proprietary, albeit meaningless, term applied by one single distributor. It is an acronym for Columbia Pneumatic Leather.                 >to know if anyone has long term experience with rubber >cement painted pouches, and if it causes premature toggle, stiffness, >or failure.   Statistics are quite good for "BestTest Robber Cement" thinned with their thinner. There are also good reports about treating with thinned flowable silicone. (Nothing like that liquid silicone that used to be touted for preservation). This stuff ends up like a dryish grease, and stays that way. It does not polymerize.                   >If I were cranking out a new organ, I'd probably use square-drops with polylon for the primaries.   You are indeed a braver man than I. Every (seemingly tested) "best" new substitute for leather has failed prematurely. I tend to stick with what works the best.       > The stop nuts for the valves are tiny on these things; what would be the modern > equivalent to them?     Try Kimber-Allen.       Jim  
(back) Subject: Re: pedal reeds and a 1960 Moeller - what were they thinking? From: <Steskinner@aol.com> Date: Mon, 16 May 2005 16:33:19 EDT   In a message dated 5/15/2005 9:00:59 AM Eastern Daylight Time, RMaryman@aol.com writes: In a message dated 5/14/2005 10:10:45 PM Eastern Standard Time, Beau.Surratt@theatreorgans.com writes: This Moeller also has that lovely phenomenon of what I call the "great American reed chorus" on the swell, a 16' Bassoon (which is more an English horn than anything else), an 8' trompette, and a 4' Hautbois. What were they thinking??? I can almost understand why ONE of these was built, but so many times I am = in utter wonderment as to why ANOTHER one was ever built. There was a time when Reuter had swells with a trumpet 8', and an oboe 4'. I'm all for = "lets' give it a try" but when it just doesn't work, why not try omething = different? Don't keep making the same old mistakes, make new, bold mistakes!   On another question, I just received the specification of an organ for a College that will reside and be half-paid for by a local church. It is a = 27 rank tracker, with TWO cornets, yet NO reed chorus. Someone plese tell me why having TWO cornets is more important than to have ONE reed chorus. The = reeds are a trompette on the Great (which causes me to wonder in the first place) = and a 16 Dulzian, and 8' Cormorne in the "Swell", and a Trombone 16 in the = pedal. Wouldn't it be better to put the trumpet in the swell, and the cromorne on = the great? I just don't get organs with fully developed greats, yet wimpy, = buzzy swells. There are so many of them, it must be me that's missing the = point...   Please advise.   Steven Skinner Minister of Music First Presbyterian Church of the Covenant Erie, PA  
(back) Subject: Tamburini in Messina From: <RMB10@aol.com> Date: Mon, 16 May 2005 16:51:56 EDT   It's too bad that Adrian is going to be on the other end of the island = from Monreale, because I would love to hear a report as to the sound of that instrument. I've seen the stoplist, I've seen pictures of the console, = too, and well, being a customer of the Ruffattis, and having played a good many of = their American instruments, it would be kind of fun to hear what one of their = monster Italian organs was like. Oh well...   As to the Tamburini in Messina, the organ has 160 stops, 168 ranks, 15,700 =   pipes on 5 manuals and pedals, spread in five different cases, ranking it = among the world's largest instruments. Massimo Nosetti has recorded on it. It = was built in 1948 by Giovanni Tamburini, as a replacement to the 121 stop Tamburini organ from 1930 that was destroyed by bombs during WWII.   According to Massimo Nosetti, Mons. Raffaele Manari, who was one of = Italy's famed organists and teachers, inspired Bishop Pajno, to build this large instrument bigger and better than the previous one. Manari had been = looking for a way to give some sort of identity to Italian organ building culture. He = had been positive in his attempts to follow in the more classical French and = German styles of building, but when he explored the English tradition of organ building, he learned of it's technical and aesthetic possibilities. = Manari had many contacts with Henry Willis who gave him models of new types of reed stops = and new types of electric actions and combination actions. Willis also gave = him dimensions for consoles, which were adopted as standard for Italian organ builders after the Trent Congress in 1930.   The manual divisions are as follows on the Messina organ:   I. Positivo II. Grand'Organo II. Corale III. Recitavo IV. Solo V. Eco   Pedale Pedale d'Eco   The organ has an abundance of 8' stops (38) on the manuals, a chorus of English style tubas a 16', 8' and 4' on 600mm of wind (23.6"), two sets of = V rank Strings (Concerto Viole and Concerto Violini), in addition to the regular Viole/Celeste, Gamba/Celeste, Dulciana/Unda Maris, Flauto/Celeste, Corno Camoscio/Voce Angelica (Gemshorn) combinations. Each manual has two = different Principals and it even has a Tibia on the Solo.   I think it would be a fun organ to hear and play!   Monty Bennett    
(back) Subject: Registering Trio Sonatas From: "terry hicks" <Terrick@webtv.net> Date: Mon, 16 May 2005 13:55:32 -0700   I've never felt compelled to register the sonatas in a "sparkly" manner, and was not forced to do so at Oberlin. The issue is really a balance of sound between the voices. If the organ has lovely sounds, there is no need to do "swiss cheese" registrations as I once heard Herr Vogel refer to them. Alas, there are too many organs where one has to resort to using registrations to keep the ears interested and mask the ho-hum, boring sound of basic stops or a room that lacks decent acoustics.    
(back) Subject: Re: Sauer organ From: "Paul Valtos" <chercapa@enter.net> Date: Mon, 16 May 2005 16:59:23 -0400   Dear Dennis, Since the town of Breslau is now part of Poland and is now called = Wroclaw (I like the name Breslau better though) was it the Poles that = split up the organ or was it mostly destroyed during WWII. Breslau was = pretty much destroyed during that war. I guess that I coud probably find = out by punchng in Breslau in Google and finding out. Don't know of = anyone living there.=20 Paul ----- Original Message -----=20 From: Dennis Steckley=20 To: pipechat@pipechat.org=20 Sent: Monday, May 16, 2005 3:19 PM Subject: Sauer organ     I love the online translators-here's one paragraph about the Sauer = organ:   =20   Scarcely 25 years after the inauguration of the organ one decided to = convert and again increase the instrument. In the year 1937 the organ = received 20 further registers. In this form the instrument existed until = the Second World War. 1946 were broken off it and the material on three = "new" organs was divided. The largest part - approximately 85 registers = - was spent in the Breslauer cathedral. There today still some voices = from the once largest organ of the world are to be heard. The original = klangreichtum of the sour organ is however lost on always and can on = historical photographs from the time before 1946 be only suspected.   =20   =20   Dennis Steckley   For I am possessed of a cat, surpassing in beauty, from whom I take = occasion to bless Almighty God.   =20  
(back) Subject: Re: Registering Trio Sonatas From: "Beau Surratt" <Beau.Surratt@theatreorgans.com> Date: Mon, 16 May 2005 18:55:37 -0500   Hello All! I appreciate Mr. Hicks' remarks about the registration of trio sonatas. I have had to use swiss cheese registrations on most of the occasions when I've played such works. I am reminded of Joan Lippincott's recordings of the Trio Sonatas on the Taylor and Boody at St. Thomas- she doesn't always use such registrations because the single stops on that organ are so beautiful. My favorite way to play the slow movement of the g major trio sonata is with the top voice on a beautiful singing 8' principal and the second voice on flutes 8' and 4'. For this movement I do prefer a 16' in the pedal.   What are the views of various list members regarding 16's in the pedal voice of trios?   Blessings, Beau Surratt Organist First Congregational Church (UCC) Glen Ellyn, IL     -      
(back) Subject: RE: Registering Trio Sonatas From: "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Tue, 17 May 2005 12:01:18 +1200   >What are the views of various list members regarding 16's in the pedal voice of trios?   Depends on the organ, the acoustics, and the movement being played, in my view. I personally find no objection to a pedal 16ft if it sounds right. After all, the pieces are trio sonatas for organ, not meant to be exact copies of chamber groups.   Ross    
(back) Subject: Reger and cone valves From: "jlinger@snet.net" <jlinger@aya.yale.edu> Date: Mon, 16 May 2005 20:04:02 -0400   Colin, thank you for your thoughtful response. Id like to focus on the following paragraph   >>>Obviously, on such a huge instrument as the Newberry Memorial organ at Yale, there is a vastly increased availability of orchestral effect, which moves such an instrument one step closer to the German romantic organs of Walcker or Sauer. Nevertheless, without cone valve chests, it is unlikely that registration changes would be totally "seamless" even if set up that way on a General Crescendo pedal. For a start, the reeds, when brought into operation, would be totally out of balance and would predominate. There would be the previously mentioned problems of wind sag and bounce as ventils open and close.....and this WOULD BE HEARD! >>> end quote<<<   The Newberry is a pitman chest instrument. THERE IS NO PITCH SAG! EVER!! Yes the swell boxes are central to the crescendo effect. The reeds must = be "hidden" by them to produce the smooth and unending orchestral crescendo. However, you suggested that it was the mechanism (cone valves and rollsweller )that made the Reger style crescendo effective in a way that a cresc pedal couldnt, but your more thoughtful argument seems to lie in the tonal disposition of the instruments broad 8 foot chorus and not in its mechanism.   Joe Linger 460 Central Ave New Haven, CT 06515-2208   http://linger.dyndns.org    
(back) Subject: Re: pedal reeds and a 1960 Moeller - what were they thinking? From: "Beau Surratt" <Beau.Surratt@theatreorgans.com> Date: Mon, 16 May 2005 19:08:57 -0500   Hello All! Steve Skinner wrote:   > Wouldn't it be better to put the trumpet in the swell, and the cromorne > on the > great?   One would think, wouldn't one? If you were going to have two cornets, 2 8' reeds, and a 16' reed, I'd do the following:   Sw. 16' Bassoon and 8' trumpet with a flute cornet Gt. 8' Cromorne and a principal cornet   The 16' trombone in the pedal would be no problem, especially if one could borrow the 8' trompette in the swell at 8' and 4'.   I would think this scheme would work well for French Classical, French Romantic, and Bach/the like. If not, it would certainly be better than all those 1/4 length and 1/2 length reeds on the swell! I mean, are those stops REALLY that useful?   I'm reminded of two other organs I've played with odd reed arrangements:   1996 Visser-Rowland at First Baptist in Jackson, TN (3/62): 16'Fagot, 8' Hobo, and 4' Clarion on the Swell; 8' Trompette (en chamade) on the great; 16' Dulziann and 8' Roerschalmei on the Positief.   1989 Berghaus at St. Peter's UCC in Elmhurst, IL (3/43): Swell: 8' Oboe and 4' Clarion; Great: 16' Fagot and 8' Trompet; Positif: 8' Trichterregal   These have both been organs I've played on a rather regular basis. It seems like I've gotten a stream of instruments with odd reed = specifications.   My current instrument (a 1989 Casavant 3/46) has a more regular reed spec: Recit: 16' Bassoon-Hautbois; 8' Hautbois; 8' Trompette Harmonique; 4' Clarion; Grand Orgue: 8' Trompette; Choeur: 8' Clarinet (really a = cromorne)   Blessings, Beau Surratt Organist First Congregational Church (UCC) Glen Ellyn, IL      
(back) Subject: RE: big bashing From: "jlinger@snet.net" <jlinger@aya.yale.edu> Date: Mon, 16 May 2005 20:21:21 -0400   The Newberry organ is clearly a large waste of money. The Swell Cornet V, the Great Doppelflute, the Orchestral Dulciana Mixture and the Pedal = Octave are rarely, if ever, used.   JL    
(back) Subject: Re: Registering Trio Sonatas From: "Thomas Dressler" <rgtd@ptdprolog.net> Date: Mon, 16 May 2005 20:43:38 -0400     > I have had to use swiss cheese registrations on most of the occasions = when > I've played such works. I am reminded of Joan Lippincott's recordings of > the Trio Sonatas. . .   I studied with Joan Lippincott, and I can't repeat here what she used to call Swiss Cheese registrations. I haven't heard that recording, but I'd be very surprised if she registered that way at all. I can't think of an instance where one would "have to" use swiss cheese registration for trio sonatas.   I always use a 16' in the pedal in all the trio sonata movements, unless the organ has a particularly bad 16'. In that case I wouldn't play trios at all. You need to be careful of producing the effect of bad voicing of chords by registration. You are always safe to use a 16' in the pedal and there is no reason I know of not to.   Thomas Dressler   http://www.thomasdressler.com    
(back) Subject: The Newberry From: "Nathan Smith" <erzahler@sbcglobal.net> Date: Mon, 16 May 2005 21:04:21 -0400   Dear List,   I would encourage those who have not had an encounter with the Newberry to attend this year's alumni tour and demonstration of the instrument. Every year in late May/early June, professor Murray demonstrates the organ, and afterward we give a tour of the instrument and the organ shop. It's a great opportunity to see a top notch organ, with a real combination action (C: and meet one of your fellow pipechatters.   By the way, I can assure you the only popping and hissing at Newberry concerts comes from the trousers planted on the lovely wooden seats in the hall.   - Nate    
(back) Subject: This week's Mp3s (3 of 'em!) From: "Jonathan Orwig" <giwro@adelphia.net> Date: Mon, 16 May 2005 20:19:57 -0700   Hello Friends,   The response to my last posting (Schroeder Veni creator) was quite gratifying - it seems that even though I posted it 3 or 4 years ago, many of you didn't d/l it then (maybe many of you didn't have a high speed connection then.. I'm not sure)   So.... since several of you have encouraged me to re-post the lot AGAIN, I've decided to do so.   This time it's Schroeder's Zweite (2nd) Sonate Mvt1: *http://tinyurl.com/bmk9a Mvt 2: **http://tinyurl.com/8jg6n Mvt 3: **http://tinyurl.com/cq2t3*   *Jonathan's Notes:* These are the 3 movements of Hermann Schr=F6der's 2nd Sonata for organ. Schroeder wrote in a neo-classical style similar to Hindemith, and has several hours of organ music to his credit. Prominent in his style are the elements of quartal harmony (chords based on 4ths intead of 3rds), imitative or fugal writing, and fluent counterpoint. This sonata, while being a bit more dissonant than his first, is a wonderful display of technique for the organist (besides being just plain fun!) with runs, fanfares and occasional pedal solos. I have chosen to interpret a bit more romantically than some might, as the possibilities for interesting registration changes are numerous in this piece.   If there is sufficient interest, I'll repost some other composer's works from past years for those who might have missed them   Enjoy!   -- Jonathan Orwig Evensong Music, Media and Graphics New Organ Music http://www.evensongmusic.net    
(back) Subject: Re: Sauer organ From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Mon, 16 May 2005 20:44:50 -0700 (PDT)   Hello,   Try Polish to English....it beggars belief!   On which note, does ANYONE on the list have a smattering of Polish?   I have run into a real problem concerning an absolutely intriguing Polish organ, which must be utterly unique.   It's only a few lines of the Polish language, but they are absolutely critical to my understanding of what state the organ is in now.   Help!   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK   PS: Still contemplating the "blunder egg".     --- Jim McFarland <mcfarland6@juno.com> wrote: > Dennis: > > Have you tried the translators on Cavaille-Coll > instruments. > > You havn'e lived until you have played "the Bee on > the main thing."         __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Make Yahoo! your home page http://www.yahoo.com/r/hs  
(back) Subject: Re: Reger and cone valves From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Mon, 16 May 2005 21:05:07 -0700 (PDT)   Hello,   Mmmmmm!   Never come across a Pitman chest, but the thought did occur to me after writing about Reger and German instruments of the period, that a direct electric action, with a solenoid valve to every pipe, would be as good as the cone-chest.   I "think" the Reger style of instrument is a combination of tonality AND the actual mechansim of the Walcker-style instruments. Unfortunately, as I stated, I have never had the privilege of trying a big German romantic instrument of the period, which means that I am relying on paper knowledge rather than actual experience.   I have a major problem offering further comment, for I am not familiar with the way the "setter" combinations operate, and whether they influence the registers affected by the rollschweller pedal.   Can anyone enlighten me/us?   However, I can confirm that the 4-manual Walcker at Doesburg in Holland, is a very meaty swirl of sound with enormously powerful bass pipes and pedal reeds. That took me a little by surprise when I heard it, because the Schulze organs (circa 1860) with which I am familiar and have given recitals upon, are very, very different beasts indeed.....sort of supercharged "baroque" but with added quieter effects.   I think the specification of the Sauer organ at the Breslau "Jahrhundrethalle" says it all.....the number of 8ft stops is phenomenal, even for an organ of that size.   In retrospect, it was a very expensive way of getting a seamless crescendo across a huge dynamic range!   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK           --- "jlinger@snet.net" <jlinger@aya.yale.edu> wrote: > Colin, thank you for your thoughtful response. > .........your more thoughtful > argument seems to lie in the > tonal disposition of the instruments broad 8 foot > chorus and not in its > mechanism.     __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around http://mail.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: RE: big bashing From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Mon, 16 May 2005 21:18:34 -0700 (PDT)   Hello,   I've played the beast at Liverpool Cathedral, and I don't think it is excessive or over-large. Nothing is duplicated and nothing is a waste of space or money. It also happens to be an enormous building....I believe it is the largest enclosed space in the world as a single room.   Passau is really a collection of organs controlled from one console, but it is so incredibly rich and sonorous, I don't see it as a white-elephant of an instrument.   On the other hand, there are a number of instruments around the world which end up being political statements rather than musical ones....I would suggest that Atlantic City is one.   But wouldn't it be a boring world if everything was rational and orderly, minimalist and purely functional?   After all, there are automobiles which go fast, and those that serve a specific purpose, but a Rolls-Royce is gloriously excessive. As for the Bugatti Royale (think 101 dalmations and Cruella de Ville!) it was motoring decadence to the point of vulgarity....yet they were magnificent.   However, there is a MUSICAL point to consider.   Did anyone ever write music for a 7-manual organ, or a 6 or even a 5?   I haven't found ways of using more than 4 manuals at the same time.   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK   --- "jlinger@snet.net" <jlinger@aya.yale.edu> wrote: > The Newberry organ is clearly a large waste of > money. The Swell Cornet V, > the Great Doppelflute, the Orchestral Dulciana > Mixture and the Pedal Octave > are rarely, if ever, used.       Yahoo! Mail Stay connected, organized, and protected. Take the tour: http://tour.mail.yahoo.com/mailtour.html    
(back) Subject: RE: Registering Trio Sonatas From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Mon, 16 May 2005 21:26:09 -0700 (PDT)   Hello,   I don't know about authentic performances of Trio Sonatas, but I was once confronted with an instrument of just two ranks placed on unit chests; a large-ish Diapason and a Gedackt rank.   The other ranks were prepared for.   I seem to recall playing the no.1 Eb TS on the 4ft Gedackt register (RH), the 8ft Gedackt register (LH) and the same 8ft Gedackt on the pedals.....sounded really cute.   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK   --- TheShieling <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> wrote:   > >What are the views of various list members > regarding 16's in the pedal > voice of trios?     __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around http://mail.yahoo.com