PipeChat Digest #5348 - Tuesday, May 17, 2005
 
Re: Murray/Woolsey (was Rollschweller and cone valve chests)
  by <Gfc234@aol.com>
Re: Registering Trio Sonatas
  by "Charles & Maria DeVita-Krug" <cdkrug@worldnet.att.net>
Re: Registering Trio Sonatas
  by <Gfc234@aol.com>
Re: Organist/choirmasters (just some thoughts)
  by "Desiree'" <nicemusica@yahoo.com>
Re: Organist/choirmasters (longish)
  by "Shirley" <pnst.shirley@verizon.net>
RE: "Broken glass" at Liverpool
  by "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
RE: 16' in middle movts. (was Registering Trio Sonatas)
  by "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
Re: Phoenix organ in Liverpool Cathedral
  by "John Foss" <harkat@kat.forthnet.gr>
Carillon Questions
  by "Channing Ashbaugh" <channinga@carolina.rr.com>
Re: Organist/Choirmasters
  by <Justinhartz@aol.com>
RE: Phoenix organ in Liverpool Cathedral
  by "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
Re: Organist/Choirmasters
  by "Maurits Lamers" <maurits@weidestraat.nl>
Murray/Woolsey
  by "jlinger@snet.net" <jlinger@aya.yale.edu>
Re: Registering Trio Sonatas
  by "Charles & Maria DeVita-Krug" <cdkrug@worldnet.att.net>
Re: Murray/Woolsey (was Rollschweller and cone valve chests)
  by "M Fox" <ophicleide16@direcway.com>
Re: Organist/Choirmasters
  by "Desiree'" <nicemusica@yahoo.com>
Re: Organist/Choirmasters
  by "Desiree'" <nicemusica@yahoo.com>
Re: Organist/Choirmasters
  by <gfc234@aol.com>
Organist/choirmaster redux
  by "Charles Peery" <cepeery@earthlink.net>
untitled composition question
  by <blueeyedbear@aol.com>
Adoro devote
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Murray/Woolsey (was Rollschweller and cone valve chests) From: <Gfc234@aol.com> Date: Tue, 17 May 2005 14:26:12 EDT     In a message dated 5/17/05 1:23:06 PM, lindr@core.com writes:     > I recently heard a Thomas Murray CD of transcriptions on the Woolsey = Hall > organ at Yale (it contains Nimrod, On Hearing the First Cuckoo in = Spring, > and many more remarkable things), and I encountered the most seamless > crescendi and diminuendi I've ever witnessed. This is sheer genius. How = does > Mr. Murray do it? Does he have registrational help or manage it all by > himself? > > Sorry I can't remember the title of the CD, but it is on the OHS = website, > I'm sure, and is a must-have recording. > > Robert Lind > >   Bob- He played the devil out of Alice Millar about 4 years ago--took two disks worth of pistons to get through the recital. gfc       Gregory F. Ceurvorst 1921 Sherman Ave. #GS Evanston, IL 60201 847.332.2788 home/fax 708.243.2549 mobile gfc234@aol.com gfc234@nextel.blackberry.net    
(back) Subject: Re: Registering Trio Sonatas From: "Charles & Maria DeVita-Krug" <cdkrug@worldnet.att.net> Date: Tue, 17 May 2005 14:44:00 -0400   On Mon, May 16, 2005 at 06:55:37PM -0500, Beau Surratt wrote: > Hello All! > I appreciate Mr. Hicks' remarks about the registration of trio = sonatas. > I have had to use swiss cheese registrations on most of the occasions = when   Swiss Cheese?   What's that mean in this context?   *must-resist-temptation-to-make-Hohlflote-pun*    
(back) Subject: Re: Registering Trio Sonatas From: <Gfc234@aol.com> Date: Tue, 17 May 2005 14:34:03 EDT     In a message dated 5/17/05 1:30:38 PM, cdkrug@worldnet.att.net writes:     > > Swiss Cheese? > > What's that mean in this context? >   it means using registrations that have holes in them--i .e. 8 and 1 etc...       Gregory F. Ceurvorst 1921 Sherman Ave. #GS Evanston, IL 60201 847.332.2788 home/fax 708.243.2549 mobile gfc234@aol.com gfc234@nextel.blackberry.net    
(back) Subject: Re: Organist/choirmasters (just some thoughts) From: "Desiree'" <nicemusica@yahoo.com> Date: Tue, 17 May 2005 12:14:58 -0700 (PDT)   This is a great topic title. I have not followed postings upon it at all, = but just the heading evokes some thoughts. ---Im reminded of the very first job I had. It was an Interim. At my = closing evaluation...they said my organ playing was very good...but I = needed to learn how to conduct a choir. I also recall an interview I had = once with a church in California. They asked me about my organ playing for = 10 minutes. For 35- 45 minutes, we talked about choral music. ---As an aspiring Organist-Choirmaster (hopefully for a full time church), = My long term goal is a situation where I am with an assistant to play = while I conduct. Back home at church, the O-Chm played hymns, and service = music, and the assistant accompanied. Duties were shared at times too. = Choir was split in the Chancel in the traditional Episcopal style. The = console to the A-S was in a pit off to the side. ---I do find it challenging to do both at the same time. That's why I was = very adamant in my school search that I find a place that would allow me = to place heavy emphasis on Choral Conducting, while having Organ as my = primary instrument. I was even more interested in places where there Organ = professor was conductor of a choral ensemble at the school or in the = community. I will have that situation at the chosen school. I feel that = they will have a lot to offer me in this area. I wished more schools had = programs like this. I'll be fine with my choice. TDH   --------------------------------- Do you Yahoo!? Read only the mail you want - Yahoo! Mail SpamGuard.
(back) Subject: Re: Organist/choirmasters (longish) From: "Shirley" <pnst.shirley@verizon.net> Date: Tue, 17 May 2005 15:34:10 -0400       On 17 May 2005 at 9:44, Charles Peery expounded:   > Are there musical limits to the > amount of improvement one can make in a choir, musically, if you have > to both play and conduct?     To some degree, yes, since your hands cannot be both in the air and on the =   keyboard simultaneously. You learn to use body language to communicate.   That, and make sure your choir knows the piece and what you want from it *thoroughly* in rehearsal. See if they can do it w/o you conducting in = front of them.   Also, have them rehearse it - or parts of it - a cappella so you *can* = conduct.   Just some thoughts from a church musician who has spent more time in a combined position than not. :)   --Shirley      
(back) Subject: RE: "Broken glass" at Liverpool From: "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Wed, 18 May 2005 08:19:05 +1200   >"Actually" Ross, the glass was the work of John Piper and Patrick Reyntiens and I seem to recall somewhat dimly, from 40 years ago, that they were at the cutting-edge of glass technology and used epoxy adhesives extensively for the first time, which may explain the falling glass!   Yes, I knew that. I'm not wildly impressed by John Piper, to be honest, as he often has far too much staining on the glass, making the result much dimmer than it should. This is so of the baptistry window at Coventry, far more gloomy than photos show it to be. The Liverpool west window has no staining on it so all the glorious colour is right in your face 100%. Too, piper also used epoxy at a church in London to stick bits of glass onto sheet plain glass, applique fashion, and it all began to fall off the = moment there was a hot spell, as the bits and the backing glass expanded at different rates. When I make my windows using this method I use a silicon stuff that always remains very flexible. My first window using this method was at the church I designed (and helped to build) in Wainuiomata, and = since completion in 1983, there has not been the slightest change to the "glue" and nothing even come loose. I've made windows using this system for four other churches and several houses, and am in the process of being commissioned for about another six square yards at the moment.   >With every colour of the visible spectrum, the lantern is the largest stained-glass window in the world.   I don't believe this is true at all. That honour would have to be at an = art gallery in Australia, where the entire ceiling is of stained glass - a ceiling some 75ft wide and 150ft long, at least. The effect is = mind-blowing - I lay flat on my back on the floor to appreciate it.   >Long live modernity! Talking of which.....look up Tokyo Catheral.   No objection to modernity in itself. A stunning building, and also not in the slightest traditional, is the San Francisco RC Cathedral, where there = is a 4m Ruffatti.   Ross    
(back) Subject: RE: 16' in middle movts. (was Registering Trio Sonatas) From: "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Wed, 18 May 2005 08:39:24 +1200       >Over many decades I've noticed that Pedal 16' Bourdons, Subbasses, etc., appear to be some of the worst-voiced ranks on an organ. Various pipes may be overly fluffy, indeterminate, and/or slow to develop at the bottom; and toward the top (particularly the final half octave) certain notes may be hooty and/or overly loud.   This is certainly true, and a major reason why one cannot state 100% = rules, but must examine each organ carefully for its merits and demerits. On an organ in Wellington here, a rebuilt 2m of about 15 stops from 1916, of = most undistinguished design, there is an extraaordinary Pedal division which = has three 16fts - Open Diapason (metal), Contra Gamba and Bourdon. The Gamba = is open metal, of about 7" scale at CCC, and purrs superbly like a = double-bass all the way to the bottom. Now that is a stop which could be used in some trio movements where the kind of Bourdon you describe would be horrendous. =     Sometimes, coupling a manual down is the only possible thing to do. The = only way to get a clear Pedal line on some instruments is to couple down the Swell 8ft Open Diapason.   For my part, I want to stress to any organist, over and over and over = again, to listen carefully to any stops or combinations throughout the compass, = and not make doctrinaire judgments based on what we think "ought" to sound right, but rather on what our ears tell us. For this, it is essential that we sometimes sit in the middle of the nave and get someone else to play a whole lot of stuff on different registrations.   Ross    
(back) Subject: Re: Phoenix organ in Liverpool Cathedral From: "John Foss" <harkat@kat.forthnet.gr> Date: Tue, 17 May 2005 23:43:28 +0300   Well, the Phoenix organ in this acoustic (Liverpool Cathedral) sounds excellent. It is a pleasure to play, the console being a "real" one, I = think from a retired church organ. It has massive amplifiers and speakers, which =   are situated in both the gallery at the West End and on the bridge across the Nave. The Fanfare Trumpet, in the West Gallery, will certainly wake = any bridge players in the congregation as they may think it's the last trump. Phoenix use the sampling system, Copemann Hart the musicom. In your part = of the world another very successful musicom digital organ builder is Bill Glasson - his organs have been installed in Cathedrals and Churches in Sydney and Melbourne, and other antipodean buildings. The two big ones I played in Australia were Scotch College chapel, Melbourne, which was on a par with any digital instrument I have played, as was the organ = temporarily installed in St Paul's Burwood - it is probably still there - which I practised on for three days. It had previously been used in the RC = Cathedral in Melbourne while the organ there was being rebuilt. Bill Glasson has a full order book and is working on a 4 manual at the moment, AFAIK. He designs and builds them all himself, from the plans through to the console =   and electronics, so each one is hand made. I think this is also true of Copemann Hart, Veritas (Graham Blyth's company) and Phoenix.   John Foss http://www.organsandorganistsonline.com/about.htm http://launch.groups.yahoo.com/group/orgofftop/   > Subject: RE: Phoenix organ in Liverpool Cathedral > From: "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> > Date: Tue, 17 May 2005 21:48:11 +1200 > > JF wrote: The Phoenix organ in Liverpool Cathedral is a large three = manual > digital > instument of excellent quality. Perhaps your use of the word "electroid" =   > was intended to be complimentary? > > "Electroid" is the term I usually use round here as I know it annoys the > parish - well, our 2m Allens are 14 years old and are not good! I meant = n > either good nor bad by the term. From listening to recordings, only, I'd =   > put > Phoenix just below Copeman-Hart and above both Allen and Rodgers in > quality. > Would you, John?      
(back) Subject: Carillon Questions From: "Channing Ashbaugh" <channinga@carolina.rr.com> Date: Tue, 17 May 2005 16:51:17 -0400   Hello,   I have some carillon Questions my questions are:     1. What is the difference between the symphonic carillon and the = schulmerich Carillon americana Aren't these both Organ looking keyboards from = listening to the sound samples these Keyboards sound alot alike? 2. I would like to talk to people about electronic carillons and have friends that know about electronic carillons if you would like to talk to =   me etc please e-mail me .   if you know the answers please e-mail me at channing28270@yahoo.com   Channing    
(back) Subject: Re: Organist/Choirmasters From: <Justinhartz@aol.com> Date: Tue, 17 May 2005 16:52:34 EDT   Here's a shortish answer to a longish question.   In a Liturgical situation, as long as the sight lines are OK, it is always better to have the Organist be the Choirmaster. In preparing a choir for a service, all musical details need to be addressed during the rehearsal. Excellent musical results have been = achieved this way for generations. Having a seperate choir director waving his or her arms at the singers = is unnecessary and distracting, particularly in Anglican churches. Concert performances or recording sessions add a dimension which may benefit from having a seperate director.   Justin Hartz  
(back) Subject: RE: Phoenix organ in Liverpool Cathedral From: "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Wed, 18 May 2005 09:07:45 +1200   >In your part of the world another very successful musicom digital organ builder is Bill Glasson - his organs have been installed in Cathedrals and Churches in Sydney and Melbourne, and other antipodean buildings.   John, do a wee bit of geography. Oz is not in NZ's part of the world, = being 1200 miles away at the closest point. It takes hours to fly across the = great ditch called the Tasman Sea.   There are no Phoenix or Copeman-Hart instruments in NZ and it's unlikely there will be.   Ross    
(back) Subject: Re: Organist/Choirmasters From: "Maurits Lamers" <maurits@weidestraat.nl> Date: Tue, 17 May 2005 23:51:23 +0200   Mmm, I beg to differ...   In my opinion one should never play and direct at the same time,=20 because doing one thing good will always diminish the quality of the=20 second. I   In these things I think quality should have priority. If you are=20 playing you need full concentration to play well. The same counts for=20 the directing. If you have to direct and play at the same time, your=20 concentration will have to be divided between directing and playing, so=20=   compromising quality on both of them. If your only role is to give the=20=   choir a sign to begin, ask one of the singers, learn him of her how to=20=   show the choir to begin and let him or her do it.   There are quite a few solutions to this. I think you should avoid=20 directing and playing as much as possible.   greets   Maurits       On 17-mei-05, at 22:52, Justinhartz@aol.com wrote:   > =A0=A0=A0 Here's a shortish answer to a longish question. > =A0 > =A0=A0=A0 In a Liturgical situation, as long as the sight lines are = OK,=A0it=20 > is always better to have the Organist be the Choirmaster. > =A0=A0=A0 > =A0=A0=A0 In preparing a choir for a service, all musical details need = to be=20 > addressed during the rehearsal. Excellent musical results have been=20 > achieved this way for generations. > =A0=A0=A0 Having a seperate choir director waving=A0his or her=A0arms = at the=20 > singers is unnecessary and distracting, particularly in Anglican=20 > churches. > =A0=A0=A0 Concert performances or recording sessions add a dimension = which=20 > may benefit from having a seperate director. > =A0 > Justin Hartz > =A0=  
(back) Subject: Murray/Woolsey From: "jlinger@snet.net" <jlinger@aya.yale.edu> Date: Tue, 17 May 2005 17:56:06 -0400   Woolsey has two complete divisions (solo and swell) both with double sets = of reeds (trumpets and trombas) under expression. By opening one box and adding stops to the other while closed, then opening it, then adding stops to the Great, you have the ticket. This is of course more difficult to do on smaller instruments in dryer acoustics. There are even enough strings = on the instrument to hide the entire Swell reed battery, so a smoothe cresc from strings to reeds is possible!       Joe Linger 460 Central Ave New Haven, CT 06515-2208   http://linger.dyndns.org   Subject: Murray/Woolsey (was Rollschweller and cone valve chests) From: "Robert Lind" <lindr@core.com> Date: Tue, 17 May 2005 13:18:53 -0500   I recently heard a Thomas Murray CD of transcriptions on the Woolsey Hall organ at Yale (it contains Nimrod, On Hearing the First Cuckoo in Spring, and many more remarkable things), and I encountered the most seamless crescendi and diminuendi I've ever witnessed. This is sheer genius. How = does Mr. Murray do it? Does he have registrational help or manage it all by himself?   Sorry I can't remember the title of the CD, but it is on the OHS website, I'm sure, and is a must-have recording.   Robert Lind         ****************************************************************** "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org>    
(back) Subject: Re: Registering Trio Sonatas From: "Charles & Maria DeVita-Krug" <cdkrug@worldnet.att.net> Date: Tue, 17 May 2005 18:46:38 -0400   On Tue, May 17, 2005 at 02:34:03PM -0400, Gfc234@aol.com wrote: > > In a message dated 5/17/05 1:30:38 PM, cdkrug@worldnet.att.net writes: > > > > > > Swiss Cheese? > > > > What's that mean in this context? > > > > it means using registrations that have holes in them--i .e. 8 and 1 > etc... >   Huh . . . I've been doing that for color pretty much forever. I first learn it by listening to Jesse Owens an open harmony TO style. He'd use 16-4 in the RH, with the LH picking up the melody on the solo manual.   I just figure it brought out the melody, but I'm more of a "This sounds right" than made any attempt to be "historic" (not really possible on the organs I play).      
(back) Subject: Re: Murray/Woolsey (was Rollschweller and cone valve chests) From: "M Fox" <ophicleide16@direcway.com> Date: Tue, 17 May 2005 15:39:03 -0700       >I recently heard a Thomas Murray CD of transcriptions on the Woolsey Hall > organ at Yale (it contains Nimrod, On Hearing the First Cuckoo in = Spring, > and many more remarkable things), and I encountered the most seamless > crescendi and diminuendi I've ever witnessed. This is sheer genius. How > does > Mr. Murray do it? Does he have registrational help or manage it all by > himself?   He does it by himself -- watching him play this kind of repertoire on a = big Skinner is quite amazing: he will use a lot of pistons, covering the = changes with subtle use of swells. It is almost like a second level of performance =   laid on top of the impeccable observation of note values and phrasing. I think that artists like Best and Lemare would be pleased that their tradition lives on.   MAF    
(back) Subject: Re: Organist/Choirmasters From: "Desiree'" <nicemusica@yahoo.com> Date: Tue, 17 May 2005 15:42:16 -0700 (PDT)   What would Uncle Gerre's thoughts be upon Organist Choirmastering? I think that its just better to have an Organist Chm and an Asst. Org-ChM. =         --------------------------------- Yahoo! Mail Mobile Take Yahoo! Mail with you! Check email on your mobile phone.
(back) Subject: Re: Organist/Choirmasters From: "Desiree'" <nicemusica@yahoo.com> Date: Tue, 17 May 2005 15:53:38 -0700 (PDT)   I think Maurits has said it all in just the right manner! Cheers' TDH   Maurits Lamers <maurits@weidestraat.nl> wrote: Mmm, I beg to differ...   In my opinion one should never play and direct at the same time, because doing one thing good will always diminish the quality of the second. I   In these things I think quality should have priority. If you are playing you need full concentration to play well. The same counts for the directing. If you have to direct and play at the same time, your concentration will have to be divided between directing and playing, so compromising quality on both of them. If your only role is to give the choir a sign to begin, ask one of the singers, learn him of her how to show the choir to begin and let him or her do it.   There are quite a few solutions to this. I think you should avoid directing and playing as much as possible.   greets   Maurits       --------------------------------- Discover Yahoo! Have fun online with music videos, cool games, IM & more. Check it out!
(back) Subject: Re: Organist/Choirmasters From: <gfc234@aol.com> Date: Tue, 17 May 2005 19:02:57 -0400   I would have to agree with Justin-in most cases-careful rehearsal will = insure a tight performance-regardless of whether or not there is a sep. = conductor. A well-rehearsed choir, that is accustomed to the OCM, will = respond with just the slightest facial expression or physical gesture. = Another issue with having a sep. conductor is the chance for a power = struggle. 99.999 percent of the organists I know are much better = musicians than people who just conduct choirs and do not play the organ. = It is the accompanist who has the real power. I can't tell you how many = poor conductors I've seen--who can't just beat simple time--and CUE = ENDINGS WELL. greg -----Original Message----- From: Desiree' <nicemusica@yahoo.com> To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Tue, 17 May 2005 15:53:38 -0700 (PDT) Subject: Re: Organist/Choirmasters     I think Maurits has said it all in just the right manner! Cheers' TDH   Maurits Lamers <maurits@weidestraat.nl> wrote: Mmm, I beg to differ...   In my opinion one should never play and direct at the same time, because doing one thing good will always diminish the quality of the second. I   In these things I think quality should have priority. If you are playing you need full concentration to play well. The same counts for the directing. If you have to direct and play at the same time, your concentration will have to be divided between directing and playing, so compromising quality on both of them. If your only role is to give the choir a sign to begin, ask one of the singers, learn him of her how to show the choir to begin and let him or her do it.   There are quite a few solutions to this. I think you should avoid directing and playing as much as possible.   greets   Maurits           Discover Yahoo! Have fun online with music videos, cool games, IM & more. Check it out!  
(back) Subject: Organist/choirmaster redux From: "Charles Peery" <cepeery@earthlink.net> Date: Tue, 17 May 2005 16:23:38 -0700 (PDT)   Some interesting and thought provoking ideas, I appreciate them! I guess w= hat I'm asking is if could be said that playing and conducting is an optima= l setup or just one we've fallen into by default. A couple people responde= d that it was optimal. One said, as justification, that it somehow provide= d a seamless flow of interpretive concept within the piece. (I'm paraphrasi= ng here.) That might be a little ephemeral for me to grasp. Others claime= d it was optimal, because, after all, look at the Anglican cathedrals or Ge= rre Hancock. My point would be that I think they're working with far more = ideal conditions all-round than most of us do. =20   A couple of people have said "Do more a cappella works." My retort to this= (besides saying I do this quite a bit because the literature is plentiful = and worthy) would be that it's like admitting that the set-up IS faulty in = the first place. Same with "get an assistant to play". If this were a mul= ti-staff program, I'd HAVE an assistant, shoot, I'd have a whole dang organ= ist! Plus a secretary and a music refiler and... I better stop. "Get a v= olunteer"... well.. if I got someone else to play, it would be to play some= thing that was more complex than I could manage myself, which means it woul= d have to be one heck of a good amateur. Same with conducting, I'd want so= meone with real technique, not a figurehead waver.   I think there have been some great recommendations about rehearsing a cappe= lla, or rehearsing without a conductor, or appointing a choirmember to give= entrance signals. I still get to the fact that, despite whatever crafty r= ehearsal techniques I use, when we actually sing in the service, I'm playin= g and looking and nodding. Drawknobs, tenors, swell piston 3, general 7 wi= th my left foot, the usual. My attention on the singers is somewhat divided= , so it's hard to come up with an accurate assessment of how good their sin= ging was. Musicians in the congregation say nice things, but... And when I= think about a hymn concertato, something with choir, congregation, organ, = bells, and a brass quartet, it boggles my mind. I've done this, don't get = me wrong. I was buried at the console, surrounded by brass players, bell c= hoir at my back, choir in front of me. Do you know what the only criticism= was? "You needed to signal the congregation whenever it was time for them= to sing." Signal them? With what, an emergency flare? I was hidden behin= d the bell choir! It starts to get to me after a while.   People have written telling me to sing four-part hymns or spirituals...I gu= ess I failed to make it clear that we are somewhat beyond that level of lit= erature, even though the singers are average. We've done the Javier Busto = "Ave Maria", the Kenneth Leighton "Solus ad Victimam", the Randall Thompson= "Alleluia", the old Thomas Cousins warhorse "Glorious Everlasting". Hande= l, Mendelssohn, Palestrina, yeah, even the Billings "When Jesus Wept". I'm= not hesitant about the literature. But let's say I want to do the Britten= "Rejoice in the Lamb", or even the Rutter "O Clap Your Hands"? I just th= ink it's problematic, they're going to need more help than I can give them = if I play at the same time. And doesn't that really mean the entire set-up= is self-limiting?   Another way to look at it is this: if you could have the ideal job or desig= n the ideal church music program, which would it have? A conductor who als= o plays for the choir while they sing the anthem, or one who does not?   Chuck Peery St. Louis      
(back) Subject: untitled composition question From: <blueeyedbear@aol.com> Date: Tue, 17 May 2005 19:25:37 -0400   i have a question for the list. i'm planning to play a piece in church = and i don't know how to program it. it's untitled and has no tempo = marking. what suggestions do you have for printing it in the sunday = bulletin? thanks, scot  
(back) Subject: Adoro devote From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Tue, 17 May 2005 18:44:42 -0500   Howdy. As you know, I am playing a gig for the RCs the last Sunday in May, Corpus Christi Sunday. One of our hymns is 'Adoro devote'. I could always improvise, but has anyone (hint, hint, Bob Lind) done an organ solo prelude/rendition of it that I could learn fairly quickly to use at an appropriate interval? I have an old Gerald Near set of variations, and some by Dale Wood, I believe, but cannot recall anything else in the library. My cantor will also be singing the Mozart 'Ave verum corpus'. I'm learning the service music, and think I'll manage not to embarrass myself too much.   Thanks.   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com