PipeChat Digest #5349 - Tuesday, May 17, 2005
 
RE: 16' in middle movts. (was Registering Trio Sonatas)
  by "Beau Surratt" <Beau.Surratt@theatreorgans.com>
Re: untitled composition question
  by "Jan Nijhuis" <nijhuis.jan@gmail.com>
Re: untitled composition question
  by "Tim Bovard" <tmbovard@earthlink.net>
Re: Adoro devote
  by "Robert Lind" <lindr@core.com>
RE: Adoro devote
  by "Michael David" <michaelandmaggy@comcast.net>
Re: 16' in middle movts. (was Registering Trio Sonatas)
  by "Thomas Dressler" <rgtd@ptdprolog.net>
Re: 16' in middle movts. (was Registering Trio Sonatas)
  by "Thomas Dressler" <rgtd@ptdprolog.net>
oops
  by "Thomas Dressler" <rgtd@ptdprolog.net>
Re: Dirtiest organ story - a new thread
  by "Margo Dillard" <dillardm@airmail.net>
RE: 16' in middle movts. (was Registering Trio Sonatas)
  by "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
Adoro te devote
  by "Tania Durova" <tania.durova@skynet.be>
RE: Carillon Questions
  by "Michael David" <michaelandmaggy@comcast.net>
Re: Adoro devote
  by "David Maxwell" <dmaxwel2@maine.rr.com>
the organist-choirmaster...
  by "Randy Terry" <randy@peacham.homeip.net>
Re: the organist-choirmaster...
  by <Gfc234@aol.com>
Re: Murray/Woolsey (was Rollschweller and cone valve chests)
  by "Nathan Smith" <erzahler@sbcglobal.net>
Re: the organist-choirmaster...
  by <Innkawgneeto@cs.com>
Re: Adoro devote
  by <DERREINETOR@aol.com>
 

(back) Subject: RE: 16' in middle movts. (was Registering Trio Sonatas) From: "Beau Surratt" <Beau.Surratt@theatreorgans.com> Date: Tue, 17 May 2005 18:57:22 -0500   Ross wrote:   > For my part, I want to stress to any organist, over and over and over > again, > to listen carefully to any stops or combinations throughout the > compass, and > not make doctrinaire judgments based on what we think "ought" to sound > right, but rather on what our ears tell us.   My point exactly! I prefer the sound of a nice 16' flue in such a piece as the middle movment of the g major trio sonata, but if situation with the 16' was as Mr. Lind suggested, I would certainly not hesitate not to use the 16'.   A lot of what I mentione that I like is simply a matter of prefence. Although I understand the reasons why people register trios in particular ways, I tend to go for an overall "pleasant sonic experience" when registering a piece. If I am pleased by the way a particular registration sounds and it speaks to me, I can only assume that such a situation will lead to the same response from my audience. I may consider such issues as what Mr. Lind mentioned but only if I like the way the thing sounds in the end.   Blessings, Beau Surratt Organist First Congregational Church (UCC) Glen Ellyn, IL      
(back) Subject: Re: untitled composition question From: "Jan Nijhuis" <nijhuis.jan@gmail.com> Date: Tue, 17 May 2005 16:58:16 -0700   Perhaps just what it is...   "Organ Music", Milton S. Hershey, 1900, arr. Forrest Mars and Bruce Murrie   On 5/17/05, blueeyedbear@aol.com <blueeyedbear@aol.com> wrote: >=20 > i have a question for the list. i'm planning to play a piece in church a= nd > i don't know how to program it. it's untitled and has no tempo marking.= =20 > what suggestions do you have for printing it in the sunday bulletin?=20 > =20 > thanks,=20 > =20 > scot=20     --=20 Jan Nijhuis nijhuis.jan@gmail.com  
(back) Subject: Re: untitled composition question From: "Tim Bovard" <tmbovard@earthlink.net> Date: Tue, 17 May 2005 19:08:02 -0500   At 06:25 PM 5/17/2005, you wrote: > what suggestions do you have for printing it in the sunday bulletin?   /me nominates "Untitled" by <author's name> . . . ?   :-) :-) :-)   --Tim      
(back) Subject: Re: Adoro devote From: "Robert Lind" <lindr@core.com> Date: Tue, 17 May 2005 19:33:19 -0500   Thanks for thinking of me, Glenda. I've never written anything on this = tune, although I'd like to. Right now I've got too much to do. Only a commission could wrench it out of me on real short notice.   There's an old Concordia Communion volume that has a setting of Adoro te devote by Healey Willan, which I haven't thought about in some years. It's = a bit pedestrian and vanilla, and not very long, but it might well do.   Bob Lind   ----- Original Message ----- From: Glenda <gksjd85@direcway.com> To: 'PipeChat' <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Tuesday, May 17, 2005 6:44 PM Subject: Adoro devote     > Howdy. As you know, I am playing a gig for the RCs the last Sunday in > May, Corpus Christi Sunday. One of our hymns is 'Adoro devote'. I > could always improvise, but has anyone (hint, hint, Bob Lind) done an > organ solo prelude/rendition of it that I could learn fairly quickly to > use at an appropriate interval? I have an old Gerald Near set of > variations, and some by Dale Wood, I believe, but cannot recall anything > else in the library. My cantor will also be singing the Mozart 'Ave > verum corpus'. I'm learning the service music, and think I'll manage > not to embarrass myself too much. > > Thanks. > > Glenda Sutton    
(back) Subject: RE: Adoro devote From: "Michael David" <michaelandmaggy@comcast.net> Date: Tue, 17 May 2005 19:40:47 -0500   For some unknown reason, I have the following settings somewhere in the house:   Malcolm Archer Plainsong Preludes for Organ Jacques Berthier Salve Regina Boely Easy Graded Organ Music - Book One Charles Callahan Chant, Vol. 1 Five Improvisations on Communion Hymns Petr Eben Versetti Wilbur Held Hymn Preludes and Free Accompaiments David N. Johnson Deck Thyself, My Soul, With Gladness Hymn Settings for Organ Colin Mawby Gregorian Communion Gerald Near Saint Augustine's Organbook Flor Peeters Ten Chorale Preludes on Gregorian Hymns - Op. 76 Healey Willan Works of Healey Willan   Michael       -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of Glenda Sent: Tuesday, May 17, 2005 6:45 PM To: 'PipeChat' Subject: Adoro devote   Howdy. As you know, I am playing a gig for the RCs the last Sunday in May, Corpus Christi Sunday. One of our hymns is 'Adoro devote'. I could always improvise, but has anyone (hint, hint, Bob Lind) done an organ solo prelude/rendition of it that I could learn fairly quickly to use at an appropriate interval? I have an old Gerald Near set of variations, and some by Dale Wood, I believe, but cannot recall anything else in the library. My cantor will also be singing the Mozart 'Ave verum corpus'. I'm learning the service music, and think I'll manage not to embarrass myself too much.   Thanks.   Glenda Sutton    
(back) Subject: Re: 16' in middle movts. (was Registering Trio Sonatas) From: "Thomas Dressler" <rgtd@ptdprolog.net> Date: Tue, 17 May 2005 20:44:16 -0400   For my part, I want to stress to any organist, over and over and over=20 > again, > to listen carefully to any stops or combinations throughout the = compass,=20 > and > not make doctrinaire judgments based on what we think "ought" to sound > right, but rather on what our ears tell us. For this, it is essential = that > we sometimes sit in the middle of the nave and get someone else to = play a > whole lot of stuff on different registrations. >   I would agree with this somewhat and disagree with it somewhat. There = are=20 some things and types of music that require a more "doctrinaire" = approach,=20 and yet one cannot avoid the fact that reality often misses the ideal. = Then=20 one has to make judgements and compromises. There are different = approaches=20 to registration, one of which I think of as a "color" approach and one I =   think of as a "functional" approach. Later Romantic and 20th century = music=20 often responds well to the color approach and actually needs it. When = making=20 compromises in this type of music, the goal is to come close to the = intended=20 color or effect or balance. When it comes to earlier music, particularly =   Bach, and particularly trios, then a functional approach is necessary, = at=20 least as a starting point, because that is how the music is conceived. = In=20 this music, colors are secondary to function. Organs were built with=20 specific registrational schemes in mind--organists were expected to know =   them (unfortunately the Germans did not document them as thoroughly as = the=20 French) and music was composed with this in mind.   We know that Bach was inventive in his use of registrations. We don't = know=20 in what way or what inventive combinations he used. In attempting to = play=20 his music and be creative with registrations, we need to try to decide = what=20 kinds of limits he would have imposed. As his music is always = functional,=20 with an emphasis on proper voice leading, one could make a fair guess = that=20 an approach to registration that confuses voice leading would be=20 unacceptable, and the compromises would always fall in the area of=20 functionality rather than color. In this sense, it is absolutely of=20 importance to know the "doctrines" inside and out if one wants to do = justice=20 to the intentions of the master. To just sit and play with combinations = is=20 fun, and creative, but needs to be tempered with real knowledge of the = norms=20 of the time.   To me, there are actually some old instruments that are so well = conceived=20 and voiced that swiss cheese registrations could work--IF and it's a big =   IF--the stops blend so completely that the voice leading is not = confused.=20 Most modern instruments, including Baroque style instruments, do not = blend=20 well enough to even consider skipping pitches because you can hear the=20 separate pitches. And the use of this should probably be RARE, even on = the=20 rare instruments that can do it. (We're talking Bach, now.)   In my opinion and experience, a given organ will have only a very few=20 possible trio registrations that do correct justice to the music. If = these=20 are not possible, yes, you can get creative with registrations, of = course,=20 but you have gone into a different realm. One has to make these kinds of =   decisions, and I want to stress that there are different approaches to = this=20 decision making. My ideal trio registration is just that (and I have to = say=20 that I have been able to use it quite often on well built organs in = Baroque=20 style.) Other times I have had to compromise, sometimes with nice = results,=20 as long as the concept of the music is kept intact. *BUT* I would just = not=20 play a trio sonata in public on an instrument that is not capable of = doing=20 it in a way that maintains the integrity of Bach's writing. Others have=20 often decided otherwise and gotten pretty creative with "colors", but in = my=20 opinion, to the detriment of the music.   The point of all this is that some periods of organ writing allow more=20 flexibility in creativity than others. One needs to be familiar with the =   styles of the given period and the limitations that were accepted at the =   time. Yes, it is somewhat doctrinaire, but more for some periods than=20 others. One needs to always start from knowledge of the period, and keep =   creative compromises within the bounds of the specific period. That is, = if=20 one cares about doing justice to the composer.   Thomas Dressler   http://www.thomasdressler.com      
(back) Subject: Re: 16' in middle movts. (was Registering Trio Sonatas) From: "Thomas Dressler" <rgtd@ptdprolog.net> Date: Tue, 17 May 2005 20:47:08 -0400   > For my part, I want to stress to any organist, over and over and over=20 > again, > to listen carefully to any stops or combinations throughout the = compass,=20 > and > not make doctrinaire judgments based on what we think "ought" to sound > right, but rather on what our ears tell us. For this, it is essential = that > we sometimes sit in the middle of the nave and get someone else to = play a > whole lot of stuff on different registrations. >   I would agree with this somewhat and disagree with it somewhat. There = are=20 some things and types of music that require a more "doctrinaire" = approach,=20 and yet one cannot avoid the fact that reality often misses the ideal. = Then=20 one has to make judgements and compromises. There are different = approaches=20 to registration, one of which I think of as a "color" approach and one I =   think of as a "functional" approach. Later Romantic and 20th century = music=20 often responds well to the color approach and actually needs it. When = making=20 compromises in this type of music, the goal is to come close to the = intended=20 color or effect or balance. When it comes to earlier music, particularly =   Bach, and particularly trios, then a functional approach is necessary, = at=20 least as a starting point, because that is how the music is conceived. = In=20 this music, colors are secondary to function. Organs were built with=20 specific registrational schemes in mind--organists were expected to know =   them (unfortunately the Germans did not document them as thoroughly as = the=20 French) and music was composed with this in mind.   We know that Bach was inventive in his use of registrations. We don't = know=20 in what way or what inventive combinations he used. In attempting to = play=20 his music and be creative with registrations, we need to try to decide = what=20 kinds of limits he would have imposed. As his music is always = functional,=20 with an emphasis on proper voice leading, one could make a fair guess = that=20 an approach to registration that confuses voice leading would be=20 unacceptable, and the compromises would always fall in the area of=20 functionality rather than color. In this sense, it is absolutely of=20 importance to know the "doctrines" inside and out if one wants to do = justice=20 to the intentions of the master. To just sit and play with combinations = is=20 fun, and creative, but needs to be tempered with real knowledge of the = norms=20 of the time.   To me, there are actually some old instruments that are so well = conceived=20 and voiced that swiss cheese registrations could work--IF and it's a big =   IF--the stops blend so completely that the voice leading is not = confused.=20 Most modern instruments, including Baroque style instruments, do not = blend=20 well enough to even consider skipping pitches because you can hear the=20 separate pitches. And the use of this should probably be RARE, even on = the=20 rare instruments that can do it. (We're talking Bach, now.)   In my opinion and experience, a given organ will have only a very few=20 possible trio registrations that do correct justice to the music. If = these=20 are not possible, yes, you can get creative with registrations, of = course,=20 but you have gone into a different realm. One has to make these kinds of =   decisions, and I want to stress that there are different approaches to = this=20 decision making. My ideal trio registration is just that (and I have to = say=20 that I have been able to use it quite often on well built organs in = Baroque=20 style.) Other times I have had to compromise, sometimes with nice = results,=20 as long as the concept of the music is kept intact. *BUT* I would just = not=20 play a trio sonata in public on an instrument that is not capable of = doing=20 it in a way that maintains the integrity of Bach's writing. Others have=20 often decided otherwise and gotten pretty creative with "colors", but in = my=20 opinion, to the detriment of the music.   The point of all this is that some periods of organ writing allow more=20 flexibility in creativity than others. One needs to be familiar with the =   styles of the given period and the limitations that were accepted at the =   time. Yes, it is somewhat doctrinaire, but more for some periods than=20 others. One needs to always start from knowledge of the period, and keep =   creative compromises within the bounds of the specific period. That is, = if=20 one cares about doing justice to the composer.   Thomas Dressler   http://www.thomasdressler.com=20  
(back) Subject: oops From: "Thomas Dressler" <rgtd@ptdprolog.net> Date: Tue, 17 May 2005 20:56:23 -0400   I meant to say that in Bach's music the compromises would fall in the area =   of COLOR not functionality.   Thomas Dressler   http://www.thomasdressler.com    
(back) Subject: Re: Dirtiest organ story - a new thread From: "Margo Dillard" <dillardm@airmail.net> Date: Tue, 17 May 2005 20:07:19 -0500   Histoplasmosis is very common in the Mississippi delta area through=20 Tennessee, Mississippi, and Louisiana - to the extent that many of the=20=   people who live there have been exposed many times and may already have=20=   some spores residing in their lungs. In which case, they may suffer=20 few symptoms unless they have a major exposure (such as working in the=20=   organ you describe), Some years ago in Dalllas, workmen clearing brush=20=   in the roosting area of a bird sanctuary were unknowingly exposed to a=20=   large amount of Histo spores without proper protection (as in digging=20 in brush where poop had accumulated several inches deep). Those who=20 had other exposures in their lives (from living in areas where it was=20 common) exhibited a variety of serious, chronic symptoms. One man who=20=   had no previous exposure was hospitalized, lost a lung, and had other=20 organ involvements/failures, as well. I'm not sure if he even=20 survived.   In other words - really, really serious stuff. Stay away from large=20 accumulations of old bird poop. If you are around where lots of birds=20=   poop, make sure it is cleaned up regularly so that it can't accumulate.=20=   And if it has accumulated, treat it as a biohazard with proper=20 protection and disposal.   In your case, I'm not sure that I wouldn't recommend that they send=20 some samples of the poop to a lab to see if it contains histo spores =20 (not all bird poop contains them - from what I understand it is both=20 regional and breed-related) - if it does, there may be implications to=20=   the pipes, the wind lines, the ventilation system - not to mention the=20=   choir members....   Margo     On May 13, 2005, at 9:40 AM, BlueeyedBear@aol.com wrote:   > In a message dated 5/13/05 7:11:51 AM Pacific Daylight Time,=20 > mcfarland6@juno.com writes: > > > Histoplasmosis is a respiratory disease that may be fatal. It results > from a fungus growing in dried bird droppings, and is acquired by=20 > simply > inhaling the disturbed "poopdust." > > > my sister had histoplasmosis in the early 60s and had half a lung=20 > removed.=A0 it was due to pigeons roosting in the trees behind our = house=20 > in memphis. > > scot Dr. Margo Dillard Organist, First United Methodist Church, Lewisville, Texas Accompanist, Musical Feast Choral Society Dillard Piano and Organ Studio    
(back) Subject: RE: 16' in middle movts. (was Registering Trio Sonatas) From: "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Wed, 18 May 2005 13:14:28 +1200   >I would agree with this somewhat and disagree with it somewhat. [huge snip]   Yes, Thomas, I hear what you are saying. I wasn't intending that people should just make pretty sounds. I would hope that all our playing, = including the registration, is informed by a knowledgeable outlook of the organs and sounds of the times of the composer. Certainly, it is true that classic French and classic English pieces have a more definite sound one should = aim at than do classic German pieces: it would be wrong, for example, to play = a Cornet piece on flutes 8 & 4 for the solo, however rpetty it sounded.   Maybe we're used to different instruments, too. Here, it's rare to find = any organ at all that has the ingredients required for classic stuff. So, for example, a Tierce en Taille will most often have to be played on an Open Diapason 8ft, or a Trio on Dulciana 8 and Flute 4 on the RH, with, say, 8 Sw.Open Diap. on the LH; or maybe 8 7 2 on the Great and 8 & 4 on the = Swell.     I have used unusual registrations at times that have really worked and = suit the music well. I can think of one organ where on the RH I used Clarinet 8 = & Piccolo 2 against a LH of Gamba 8 and Stopt Flute 4. Theoretically, you might say that would be horrible and not in keeping with the music, but = the lines balanced, were musical throughout the compass needed, and were = bright and cheerful.   Even on the electronic beasties, registration often needs to be based on = the sounds achieved, rather than some theory. Here in this parish for example, on the 2m Allen electroid, 14 years old, I often add the Great Krummhorn 8 to the diapason chorus when accompanying hymns, as it gives a greater grit to the sound and blends very well indeed with the Mixture and other stuff. On the Swell of the same instrument, where the nearest thing to Diapasons are the 4ft Spitzprincipal & Mixture, in my Swell chorus reg'n in accompanying some verses of the hymn to give a break from using the Great all the way through, I am often prone to use the 8 Ged, 4 Spitzpr, 2 2/3 Nazard, 1 3/5 Tierce and Mixture IV. The reed clogs the sound, the 2 = Piccolo gives a nasty colour to the sound, and the other reeds are lifeless, = opaque and quite wrong in tone. The only other Swell 8ft flue stop on this thing, = I should add, is a 2rk string Celeste, obviously impossible to use in chorus work.   I'm sure in practice we are much closer in intention and result than you might think, but I will repeat my plea to organists to listen to what they are doing and not rely on an "inner ear" that does not necessarily relate = to what the organ is actually producing.   Ross      
(back) Subject: Adoro te devote From: "Tania Durova" <tania.durova@skynet.be> Date: Wed, 18 May 2005 03:34:54 +0200   Adoro te devote : Did anyone think about the settings of Alexandre = Guilmant ? It's in "The liturgical Organist", opus 65. The German CD-label Motette-Ursina made a recording of it, with Johan = Hermans at a Cavaill=E9-Coll in Belgium.   Tania Durova
(back) Subject: RE: Carillon Questions From: "Michael David" <michaelandmaggy@comcast.net> Date: Tue, 17 May 2005 20:50:58 -0500   You might have better luck with one of the carillon lists found at:   http://www.gcna.org/bellorg.html   Michael       -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of Channing Ashbaugh Sent: Tuesday, May 17, 2005 3:51 PM To: PipeChat Subject: Carillon Questions   Hello,   I have some carillon Questions my questions are:     1. What is the difference between the symphonic carillon and the = schulmerich   Carillon americana Aren't these both Organ looking keyboards from = listening to the sound samples these Keyboards sound alot alike? 2. I would like to talk to people about electronic carillons and have friends that know about electronic carillons if you would like to talk to =   me etc please e-mail me .   if you know the answers please e-mail me at channing28270@yahoo.com   Channing    
(back) Subject: Re: Adoro devote From: "David Maxwell" <dmaxwel2@maine.rr.com> Date: Tue, 17 May 2005 22:02:20 -0400   Glenda, At the risk of blowing my own horn, let me mention my setting of "Adoro devote" in 'Three Hymns of Meditation,", MorningStar Music, 2005. David Maxwell   ----- Original Message ----- From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> To: "'PipeChat'" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Tuesday, May 17, 2005 7:44 PM Subject: Adoro devote     > Howdy. As you know, I am playing a gig for the RCs the last Sunday in > May, Corpus Christi Sunday. One of our hymns is 'Adoro devote'. I > could always improvise, but has anyone (hint, hint, Bob Lind) done an > organ solo prelude/rendition of it that I could learn fairly quickly to > use at an appropriate interval? I have an old Gerald Near set of > variations, and some by Dale Wood, I believe, but cannot recall anything > else in the library. My cantor will also be singing the Mozart 'Ave > verum corpus'. I'm learning the service music, and think I'll manage > not to embarrass myself too much. > > Thanks. > > Glenda Sutton > gksjd85@direcway.com > > > > > > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> > >      
(back) Subject: the organist-choirmaster... From: "Randy Terry" <randy@peacham.homeip.net> Date: Tue, 17 May 2005 19:06:34 -0700   I initially resisted posting to this thread, but I concur with the lister who mentioned the political issues that often occur between separate organists and choir directors.   Generally, if there is a separate choir director, they are usually the director of music, too. I know of many instances where the choir director was a well-trained and excellent singer, but with no real choral training, and little affinity for the multiple aspects of church music ministry.   This is not to belittle them, but simply a fact of life. I've worked for some of these very people, cordially, and often offered helpful hints when asked.   When I have worked "under" a director who was also a trained keyboard player, almost always have I found that these people are better trained = and equipped for church choir work, then those who are simply "singers."   I enjoy either job when I am working with a good colleague.   +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ Randy Terry Music Minister The Episcopal Church of St. Peter Redwood City, California          
(back) Subject: Re: the organist-choirmaster... From: <Gfc234@aol.com> Date: Tue, 17 May 2005 22:17:24 EDT     In a message dated 5/17/05 9:07:01 PM, randy@peacham.homeip.net writes:     > > Generally, if there is a separate choir director, they are usually the > director of music, too. >   That is very true--and it is a rotten shame---because they do nothing but conduct the choir, and pick the CHORAL music--well--maybe service music at = some places--- its the organist who LEADS all of the congregational song--AND = plays preludes, etc...AND accompanies choirs, soloists, weddings, funerals etc....who is the REAL director of music...grrrrr       Gregory F. Ceurvorst 1921 Sherman Ave. #GS Evanston, IL 60201 847.332.2788 home/fax 708.243.2549 mobile gfc234@aol.com gfc234@nextel.blackberry.net    
(back) Subject: Re: Murray/Woolsey (was Rollschweller and cone valve chests) From: "Nathan Smith" <erzahler@sbcglobal.net> Date: Tue, 17 May 2005 22:24:34 -0400   Dear List,   I believe the Thomas Murray CD you are discussing is entitled: The Transcriber's Art   Professor Murray played Nimrod for last year's tours, and although its impossible for me to describe (let alone remember) all that he did, I do remember him flying through all of the Great local pistons in a matter of seconds for the big crescendo/diminuendo at the end of the piece.   Another delightful Woolsey moment takes place during Freshman assembly, when hundreds of unsuspecting parents on the first balcony near the organ leap out of their seats from fear when the big 25" reeds (over full organ) launch into the processional music (written by Professor Krigbaum).   Best,   Nate    
(back) Subject: Re: the organist-choirmaster... From: <Innkawgneeto@cs.com> Date: Tue, 17 May 2005 22:26:37 EDT   now if only my right hand and feet (the organist) would follow the lead of = my left hand (the choirmaster)...   HAHA   Neil  
(back) Subject: Re: Adoro devote From: <DERREINETOR@aol.com> Date: Tue, 17 May 2005 22:29:47 EDT   Glenda,   Don't forget Everett Titcomb's "improvisation" on "Adoro te devote". If = you can't get it (you can't, I'll bet) I'll send you a copy. Email me = privately. It's nice, and fun to play. My copy has registrations for "His" instrument = at St. John's, via his protege. Guaranteed to cause the pews to be mopped = down after the service.   Pax, BH