PipeChat Digest #5351 - Wednesday, May 18, 2005
 
Re: Organist/Choirmaster discussion
  by "Maurits Lamers" <maurits@weidestraat.nl>
Re: reeds - what were they thinking?
  by <Steskinner@aol.com>
Re relative distances
  by "John Foss" <harkat@kat.forthnet.gr>
RE: Re relative distances
  by "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
Casavant Action
  by "Nathan Smith" <erzahler@sbcglobal.net>
Re: Casavant Action
  by "Jim McFarland" <mcfarland6@juno.com>
Re: untitled composition question
  by "Shirley" <pnst.shirley@verizon.net>
Re: Organist/Choirmasters
  by "Stan Yoder" <vze2myh5@verizon.net>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Organist/Choirmaster discussion From: "Maurits Lamers" <maurits@weidestraat.nl> Date: Wed, 18 May 2005 11:01:44 +0200   Hi,   I have seen lots of arguments pro simultaneously playing and directing, but I have seen no arguments at all about the quality issue. We all know that, with all due respect, the congregation is not a good jury when it comes to choir singing.   What I read are mostly practical solutions and from it, I read a little bit "disrespect" for the position of choir conductor.   Organ players can be called the mightiest person during service. Still, with power comes responsibility and one has to know where this responsibility ends. Whether the organ player is a better musician than the choir director is not important at all, because it is out of the scope of responsibility of the organ player when he is playing.   The task of a choir director is basically to get the best musical performance from the choir singers as is possible at that time. He has to keep the choir singers enthousiastic, he has to solve the problems of choir singers making mistakes, he has to keep them focused. He has to entertain and he has to teach, always, whether rehearsing or performing, whether in concert or during service. It is just impossible to do that all when you have to play at the same time.   As an organ player you have the task to help the choir director by really accompany the choir, helping them stay in tune, embed their singing in the sound of your organ in such a way that the complete musical product is as good as possible at that time.   I know there are a lot of positions where you have to combine directing and playing. But read that as directing and playing at the same time is a mistake.   About the political issue: As an organ player you can have your differences with a choir director, of course. But still, taking over directing is the wrong turn. First try to get some influence, try to enlighten the choir director. It works well most of the time.   Repeating from last message: Quality should be top priority: It doesn't matter whether it sounds professional or not, but keep in mind that you should be aiming at the highest level possible. You may never arrive, but "you should die trying". :-)   And there is always one thing to remember: they don't need an organ player. They can always sing without organ. If you get ill just before service and are unable to play, they will do without you.   greetings   Maurits    
(back) Subject: Re: reeds - what were they thinking? From: <Steskinner@aol.com> Date: Wed, 18 May 2005 05:29:20 EDT   In a message dated 5/17/2005 10:05:21 AM Eastern Daylight Time,=20 dhancock@brpae.com writes: To continue, can you tell me what the instances are in which a =E2=80=9Creed= chorus=E2=80=9D=20 are required in organ literature, specifically?=20 My original complaint was about a 27 rank tracker organ going into a church,= =20 having two cornets, but no reed chorus. An acceptable reed chorus could be=20= a=20 16' anything and a 8' trumpet. The requirement for this organ would be to=20 play church services, but to answer the question, a "reed chorus" would be=20 required to play the Widor Toccata from Symphonie V, as well as any of a hun= dred=20 other pieces from the French tradition. Sowerby calls for a reed chorus in=20 "Carillon." Purvis (admitedly on the outskirts of the "organ literature"=20 definition) in "Carol Rhapsody" "Thanksgiving" "In Babilone" etc. Percy Flet= cher=20 "Toccata Festiva", Dubois "Sortie Toccata", Boelmann "Toccata" from Suite Go= thique.=20   I guess my question (rant, really) was about the wisdom of having TWO=20 cornets, at the expense of ONE reed chorus.     Steven Skinner Minister of Music First Presbyterian Church of the Covenant Erie, PA  
(back) Subject: Re relative distances From: "John Foss" <harkat@kat.forthnet.gr> Date: Wed, 18 May 2005 13:01:19 +0300   My geography is quite acceptable, thank you, Ross. In spaces so vast as = the Australian continent a distance of 1,200 miles does not seem so large and there appears to be considerable contact between Australia and New Zealand =   in the pipe organ world. The first site I looked at of organs in Melbourne =   has 2 of the 4 surviving organs by George Fincham, arguably Melbourne's = most significant indigenous builder, restored by the South Island Organ = Company, Timaru, New Zealand. http://avoca.vicnet.net.au/~ohta/famous/vic.html e.g. St Mary Star-of-the-Sea Catholic Church, West Melbourne, 1898-1900 3 manuals, 38 speaking stops, tubular-pneumatic action Restored 1992-1993 South Island Organ Company, Timaru, New Zealand This is the largest indigenously built organ to survive intact Scotch college was another joint venture between the South Island Organ Company and Peter Jewkes. The company seems to do most of its Australian work in association with Peter Jewkes, so it can't be that far in local terms. Australians and New Zealanders think nothing of crossing oceans to Britain =   and Canada to acquire their organs - Hill, Harrison and Harrison, T.C. Lewis, Le Tourneau, for example, so go on Ross - broaden your horizons! I cannot speak for Copemann Hart or Phoenix in New Zealand as I have nothing =   to do with either company other than knowing the owners on a social basis. = I don't know if Bill Glasson has put in any instruments in New Zealand - he has his work cut out at the moment and I don't think he ever advertises, = but if you wanted a good digital instrument he would be the best bet in your part of the world. I appreciate that New Zealand and Australia are = separate countries, but looking at a world Atlas I would group them together with greater ease than say, Brazil and Finland.   Ross wrote "John, do a wee bit of geography. Oz is not in NZ's part of the world, being1200 miles away at the closest point. It takes hours to fly across = the great ditch called the Tasman Sea."   This depends on what you are flying in. If you are using that magnificent stalwart of the skies, the DC3, maybe your journey will be a long one, but =   modern jets shouldn't take much over 2 and a half hours to cover 1200 = miles. OK you are not there yet, I know - but they are no further apart than the = UK (Mander for example) and the US - St Ignatius Loyola. Or Sydney Grammar School and London - Mander again. The world is not actually a smaller = place, but modern communications make it seem like it.   John Foss http://www.organsandorganistsonline.com/about.htm http://launch.groups.yahoo.com/group/orgofftop/      
(back) Subject: RE: Re relative distances From: "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Wed, 18 May 2005 22:54:09 +1200   >My geography is quite acceptable, thank you, Ross.   I have no doubts about that at all. :-)   >The first site I looked at of organs in Melbourne has 2 of the 4 surviving organs by George Fincham, arguably Melbourne's = most   significant indigenous builder, restored by the South Island Organ = Company, Timaru, New Zealand.[snip]   Yes, I'm very well aware of SIOC's work for Australia. They are a very competent company and certainly NZ's biggest, in fact the only real = company as such since the Croft collapse some years ago. The other firms are just = 1 or 2 workers. I believe the exchange rate works in SIOC's favour for work = in Oz, so that plus their own ability helps them considerably.   >I appreciate that New Zealand and Australia are separate countries, but looking at a world Atlas I would group them together with greater ease than say, Brazil and Finland.   People frequently need reminding that we are not an appendage of OZ, in exactly the same way that people need reminding that the UK is not = England. I get fed up when people ask me, "When you visited England, did you go the Military Tattoo in Edinburgh?" I give a short, snappy, pithy, blunt geography lesson in reply.   It's interesting that there has been little interchange between Oz and NZ = in organs. Hobday came from Fincham's way back over 100 years ago. We had a couple of Dodd organs 100 years ago. We had a very few Ozzie HN&Bs till about 1960, and that's it. Traffic the other way is even smaller, except that in recent years a small handful of restored 2nd-hand organs have been exported to Oz by SIOC.   A big problem we have in NZ is that the organ industry is virtually = defunct. It is very rare now to find a new organ, and even any real kind of rebuild is also rare - one or two a year at most, and not even one new instrument every year. The churches largely don't want pipe organs now and can't = afford the horrendous prices that some builders charge for even minor work.   Ross        
(back) Subject: Casavant Action From: "Nathan Smith" <erzahler@sbcglobal.net> Date: Wed, 18 May 2005 08:03:18 -0400   Dear List,   I took a little time to releather a Casavant pneumatic from my collection last night, it was pretty fun.   I have been told that the pouch material on the unit was not zephyr, but the last remains of a piece of perflex!!! (What was left disintegrated to the touch) There was also a pen mark under where the perflex was glued that indicated that it was rebuilt in 1973. I can't help but think, as I was staring into this little pneumatic's innards (as if performing a post-mortem), that the perflex killed off this Casavant organ, wherever it was, in the 70's. The material probably lasted a few years at best!   One question I did have, since my examples don't have any original material left in them, is whether the pouch was cut as a punching, or formed out of the gasket leather as an entire membrane. I will put some pictures of my unit on the net tonight, and you'll see that in order to maintain a consistent thickness in the pouch side gasket, I punched out the gaskets to fit around the edge of the pouch. I'm sure this would work, but it seems like a silly way to have made these originally...   Best,   Nate    
(back) Subject: Re: Casavant Action From: "Jim McFarland" <mcfarland6@juno.com> Date: Wed, 18 May 2005 08:31:56 -0400     On Wed, 18 May 2005 08:03:18 -0400 Nathan Smith <erzahler@sbcglobal.net> writes:   > One question I did have, since my examples don't have any > original > material left in them, is whether the pouch was cut as a punching, > or > formed out of the gasket leather as an entire membrane.         Nathan:   A single rectangular membrane.   Jim     "Build a man a fire, and he'll be warm for a day. Set a man on fire, and he'll be warm for the rest of his life." - Terry Pratchett.  
(back) Subject: Re: untitled composition question From: "Shirley" <pnst.shirley@verizon.net> Date: Wed, 18 May 2005 09:32:54 -0400       On 17 May 2005 at 19:25, blueeyedbear@aol.com expounded:   > i have a question for the list. i'm planning to play a piece in > church and i don't know how to program it. it's untitled and has no > tempo marking. what suggestions do you have for printing it in the > sunday bulletin?     Perhaps where it is in the service and its key, like Prelude in C. Or a = descriptor, like Meditation (in C), or Marche (in C). Do you have a composer name?   Or perhaps it's on organlive.com. Listen to some of the works of that = composer and see if you can find its title.   --Shirley    
(back) Subject: Re: Organist/Choirmasters From: "Stan Yoder" <vze2myh5@verizon.net> Date: Wed, 18 May 2005 09:55:20 -0400   Someone once observed that two people cannot ride the same horse and both = sit in front. Considering artistic ego, taste, perception, etc., etc., this would seem to favor = one-person O/C positions.   Stan Yoder Pittsburgh