PipeChat Digest #5354 - Wednesday, May 18, 2005
 
Re: Organist/choirmasters (longish)
  by "Karl Moyer" <kmoyer@millersville.edu>
Audio story concerning a Capital Campaign to rebuild the Wicks at the Cra
  by "Jerry Richer" <jerry@ChirpingBat.Com>
Re: Organist/choirmasters (longish)
  by "Sand Lawn" <glawn@jam.rr.com>
Re: Sauer Organ - Jahrhunderthalle
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: the organist-choirmaster...
  by "Beau Surratt" <Beau.Surratt@theatreorgans.com>
Electric action - Jahrhunderthalle
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: Electric action - Jahrhunderthalle
  by "N. Russotto" <ravenrockdesigns@gmail.com>
A Pipe Organ Survival Story (Very True!)(X-Posted)
  by <Devon3000@aol.com>
Re: Organist/choirmasters (longish)
  by "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net>
The value of brevity
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Colin
  by "alantaylor1" <alantaylor1@members.v21.co.uk>
Editing Postings - PLEASE READ!
  by "Administrator" <admin@pipechat.org>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Organist/choirmasters (longish) From: "Karl Moyer" <kmoyer@millersville.edu> Date: Wed, 18 May 2005 14:55:32 -0400   Just a bit more on this question of one person directing and accompanying from the organ at the same time:   If you=B9ve ever tried to =B3direct=B2 and accompany that marvelous prologue from Elgar=B9s oratorio The Apostles called =B3The Spirit of the Lord Is Upon Me=B2 or the David McKay Williams =B3In the Year that King Uzziah Died=B2 or =B3How Lovely Is They Dwelling Place=B2 from Brahms _Ein deutsches Requiem_ with all of the orchestral figures present in the organ part or the like, you know the challenges. Far too often two insufficiencies creep in:   1. the musician does not practice the accompaniment well enough to reflect as much of the orchestral original =8Bnot pertinent to the Williams work name= d =8B as possible at the organ. It can be challenging enough to do a good job with such accompaniments, and on occasion I have followed Vernon deTar=B9s example and used a second organist to add contrapuntal lines, chords, etc., that were just not possible with one=B9s own two hands and two feet. =B3The Spirit of the Lord=B2 is a REAL EFFORT!! I=B9ve ended up playing double-pedal= s at one or two places in that piece to make more of it =B3happen.=B2 You are VERY BUSY at the organ.   2. the musician does not then practice playing the accompaniment AND at th= e same time giving whatever direction is needed to the choir, however it gets done =8B sometimes with your head. I=B9ve always ended up =B3conducting=B2 most o= f =B3The Spirit Of the Lord=B2 with my head!! This depends, however, on the choir=B9s ability to SEE your head when you sit at the organ, and that=B9s a very important part of this discussion. It also means that you=B9ve rehearsed the choir, including hopefully a cappella some of the time, in those marvelous long lines that make the choral parts so lovely.   When the choir learns the music so well as to absorb it into their inne= r being, it sticks with them longer, too, and they can sing it not only with the technical prowess the music hopes for but with a certain sort of personal and corporate spirituality that is an important goal of Church music practice for the singers themselves. When the choir is reading music like crazy and needs to watch the conductor for every last thing, there is little spirituality to their experience; it=B9s all worry and effort.   But sometimes it really IS helpful to have a separate director for individual works. I was fortunate to have a predecessor organist/director in the parish who was highly regarded and quite competent as a conductor. Indeed, he=B9d been an outstanding high school choral director for YEARS, and he knew a lot of the repertoire. So on occasion I would work out the accompaniments and train the choir as well as I possibly could and then hav= e Dick come to rehearsal the Thursday night before we=B9d sing the piece. He was always a blessing to the choir and me when he conducted, but, frankly, you can also =B3influence=B2 an awful lot of what the choir senses as leadershi= p simply by the way you play the organ, with your =B3guest director=B2 then functioning to indicate entrances, long phrases, etc. So long as you had rehearsed the choir well for enough week for the piece to =B3sink in,=B2 the extra director became as much as comforter or stabilizer as anything else=8B but VERY valuable to all of us, including my not having to worry about ANY cues when the accomp. is so tough. Given sufficient prior rehearsal of the choir, I think it=B9s far better to bring in an assisting director than an assisting organist.   All this being said, if there is any doubt about the ability to do it, one should conjure up the memory of Vernon deTar doing one after another of great sacred choral works at Ascension Church, 5th Ave & 10th Street, NYC, during his heyday there. It was masterful and SO WELL DONE!! Perhaps someone else did it better; my limited experience focuses on him as the epitome of success in conduct and accompanying at the same time. May he rest in peace. Indeed, in the columbarium right off from the chancel at Ascension Church!   Karl E. Moyer Lancaster PA    
(back) Subject: Audio story concerning a Capital Campaign to rebuild the Wicks at the Crane School of Music at Potsdam New York! From: "Jerry Richer" <jerry@ChirpingBat.Com> Date: Wed, 18 May 2005 14:53:21 -0400   This is a 9.5 minute audio clip I happened on this morning concerning = a Capital Campaign to raise $100,000 to renovate Wicks Opus 5635 http://organ.wicks.com/display_page?p=3D200&s=3D5635, at the Helen M. = Hosner concert hall, Crane School of Music, Potsdam New York. I believe it's = Paul Jacobs playing because I think I went to the concert referred to in the interview.   http://www.northcountrypublicradio.org/news/audio/news050325d.ram     Chirp|Chirp|Chirp: It's the Bat, Chirping Bat .Com    
(back) Subject: Re: Organist/choirmasters (longish) From: "Sand Lawn" <glawn@jam.rr.com> Date: Wed, 18 May 2005 15:08:32 -0500   Re: Organist/choirmasters (longish)Dear Pipechat Folk,   The discussion of Organists/Choirmasters has been fascinating. I am = lucky in that there are two of us who both conduct and play the organ. = We switch off depending on who has had the most practice time or is most = familiar the the choral music on a particular Sunday. When one of us is = out there are two choir members with advanced degrees in Choral = Conducting plus two more retired choral directors in the congregation. = I know this is unusual for a church of around two hundred members. =20   We have a choir of 14-18 singers who are constantly being challenged to = do difficult choral music. We rehearse 90 minutes during the week and = have one hour to polish things on Sunday mornings. =20   Good luck to all ....=20   Sand Lawn (apologize for bragging about my fortunate position)
(back) Subject: Re: Sauer Organ - Jahrhunderthalle From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Wed, 18 May 2005 13:43:52 -0700 (PDT)   Hello,   I have it in the back of my mind that the huge 5-manula Sauer organ at Breslau had electro-pneumatic action, but I cannot recall where I may have seen that.   I think electrics were increasingly used as the 20th century began to unfold, but looking through the various Polish web-sites and organs, it would seem that Sauer were certainly using pneumatic actions quite regularly; so it's a bit of a borderline period.   I'll see if I can come up with the answer.   Regards,   Colin MItchell UK     --- Paul Smith <kipsmith@getgoin.net> wrote: > Was this organ built with an electric action, or was > it tubular pneumatic? I > have read that Germans built some very large > romantic instruments using > pneumatics only.       Yahoo! Mail Stay connected, organized, and protected. Take the tour: http://tour.mail.yahoo.com/mailtour.html    
(back) Subject: Re: the organist-choirmaster... From: "Beau Surratt" <Beau.Surratt@theatreorgans.com> Date: Wed, 18 May 2005 15:54:52 -0500   Hi!   Two situations come to mind which are the exception to the typical Choir Director also being the Director of Music idea.   At the Union Church of Hinsdale (UCC) in the western suburbs of Chicago, my cousin Michael Surratt, is the Director of Music which means that he oversees the many ensembles there and I believe plans worship with the Pastors. He also directs one or more of the handbell choirs and serves as principal organists, but he does not direct a vocal choir.   I believe the same or something similar is the case at Glenview Community Church in the north suburbs where Marcia VanOyen is the director of music. I think she might be on this list, so perhaps she could weigh in on this discussion.   At my church, also in the western suburbs of Chicago, we have a 3/4 time Director of Music who directs one adult choir and one children's choir and coordinates everything; an associate director of music who directs an adult choir, and a high school choir and accompanies the choir that the D of M directs. He also often plays piano during worship. I, the organist, play for the choir that the Associate D of M directs and play the prelude/offertory/postlude on Sunday in addition to accompanying the hymns. We also have a paid handbell choir director who directs the 3 (I think) handbell choirs as well as another children's choir director.   Blessings, Beau Surratt Organist First Congregational Church (UCC) Glen Ellyn, IL     -----Original Message----- From: Gfc234@aol.com To: pipechat@pipechat.org Date: Tue, 17 May 2005 22:17:24 EDT Subject: Re: the organist-choirmaster...   > > In a message dated 5/17/05 9:07:01 PM, randy@peacham.homeip.net writes: > > > > > > Generally, if there is a separate choir director, they are usually > the > > director of music, too. > > > > That is very true--and it is a rotten shame---because they do nothing > but > conduct the choir, and pick the CHORAL music--well--maybe service music > at some > places--- its the organist who LEADS all of the congregational > song--AND plays > preludes, etc...AND accompanies choirs, soloists, weddings, funerals > etc....who is the REAL director of music...grrrrr > > > > Gregory F. Ceurvorst > 1921 Sherman Ave. #GS > Evanston, IL 60201 > 847.332.2788 home/fax > 708.243.2549 mobile > gfc234@aol.com > gfc234@nextel.blackberry.net > >      
(back) Subject: Electric action - Jahrhunderthalle From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Wed, 18 May 2005 14:36:45 -0700 (PDT)   Hello,   I've just browsed around, and discovered that the Sauer company grew out of the Walcker company, and Walcker had a large input with the Jahrehunderthalle in Breslau.   I'm not sure whether it was specifically invented for this organ, but Walcker patented a new direct electric action, which seems to have been used for the Breslau instrument.   Of course, electric actions were being used elsewhere, and one of the earliest systems was that used by Annessens in Belgium in the last years of the 19th century.   Astonishingly, the huge 5-manual at Breslau was built in just over 10 months!   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK               __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around http://mail.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Re: Electric action - Jahrhunderthalle From: "N. Russotto" <ravenrockdesigns@gmail.com> Date: Wed, 18 May 2005 17:41:01 -0400   You know, Colin, I think that's the shortest email I have ever seen you=20 write! Congratulations on learning the value of words. I figured you for a= =20 'barrister' as you use three words where one is required. :)     NFR   On 5/18/05, Colin Mitchell <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> wrote: >=20 > Hello, >=20 > I've just browsed around, and discovered that the > Sauer company grew out of the Walcker company, and > Walcker had a large input with the Jahrehunderthalle > in Breslau. >=20 > I'm not sure whether it was specifically invented for > this organ, but Walcker patented a new direct electric > action, which seems to have been used for the Breslau > instrument. >=20 > Of course, electric actions were being used elsewhere, > and one of the earliest systems was that used by > Annessens in Belgium in the last years of the 19th > century. >=20 > Astonishingly, the huge 5-manual at Breslau was built > in just over 10 months! >=20 > Regards, >=20 > Colin Mitchell UK >=20 > __________________________________________________ > Do You Yahoo!? > Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around > http://mail.yahoo.com >=20 > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> >=20 >=20     --=20 Nicholas F. Russotto Somers, Connecticut Organist, Holy Cross PNCC Enfield, Connecticut Moderator/Owner: Monarch of Music=20 http://launch.groups.yahoo.com/group/monarch_of_music/  
(back) Subject: A Pipe Organ Survival Story (Very True!)(X-Posted) From: <Devon3000@aol.com> Date: Wed, 18 May 2005 17:55:20 EDT   Hi all,   Shortly after Easter, I got a letter from a dear lady who used to be a member, along with her husband and daughter, of my former church in = Evanston, Illinois. The Hinners Chapel organ needed to go, she informed me, as the = church members have decided to demolishing mansion the Hinners is in, and don't = want to re-install it in the new building.   Back in the early 70's, after we got the first newer tracker action organ = in Chicago (there are some surviving old ones), build by Kurt Roderer, 2/25, electric stop action, Gene and Virginia Perz told me that they would like = to find a small pipe organ someday to put in the small chapel at the church. The chapel is located in what used to be the game room of an old mansion the = church owns next to the Sanctuary.   I was soon able to locate a small one-manual Hinners from a catholic = church in Aurora, Illinois, Gene paid $250 for it, and we moved it in one day to = the church, where I cleaned and re-assembled it, adding a Meidinger blower, = but retaining the pumper lever also. The entire Chapel had been built by the = Perz family in memory of their oldest son, who was tragically killed while = flying a model airplane (the days when they were flown by wire, which came in = contact with a utility wire). The request for the organ came shortly after their = second son was tragically killed riding a motorcycle in California, having just returned from Viet Nam! I had to play for that funeral, and it wasn't = much fun.   Gene was a carpenter, and he often helped me as my apartment organ grew = from 3 to 15 ranks. Shortly after the dedication of the organ, the pastor of = the church decided to remodel the Chapel, which seats only about 30 people. A = big shot architect had his re-decorators paint over our beautiful stripped = down and re-oiled and stained dark walnut finish. The resulting beige color = still looks ugly, and we hope to strip it again, though I fear it was a = stain-paint combination that they used. We'll certainly try to get it back to looking = nice again.   I was organist/choir director for nine years there. A few years after leaving, the then pastor (who I didn't know) called me frantically on the = phone, telling me I had to get that organ out of there in two weeks. He wouldn't =   explain why, only that they needed more space in the room (which was = ridiculous). I couldn't find a new home that quickly, and when I called back two weeks later, I was told that the pastor had left. Why his last attempted act = had to be the removal of that organ, I'll never know. But, it survived one more = time.   Fortunately, I have frequent contact with members and former members of = that church, and I've gone back to play for funerals and weddings on occasion. = I heard shortly after the above incident that the organ got "slid" over one = foot to the left. That meant the blower had to be moved behind, and a long = about 15 foot flexaust hose was connected to the reservoir. Being a = double-rise, I discovered when I recently looked at the organ, that the blower couldn't = keep the wind up for a chord of even the 8 foot flute longer than about three seconds! They had also removed the winker I had added to stabilize the = very shaky wind. The gusset had blown, and they didn't replace it.   The result was that the organ was unplayable, except by assistance from a pumper. They earlier had also removed the pumper handle until this lack = of wind happened, when it was put back on. When I last played it, the kind old gentleman who was showing us around the buildings pumped the bellows while = we played.   Incidentally, after it was originally installed in this new place, Alec = Wyton brought a summer class over to see both the Roderer and Hinners trackers. = He pumped for almost an hour! He said he hadn't had the opportunity to do = that for many years, and thoroughly enjoyed it.   The Hinners is the typical workhorse instrument that dotted the = countryside of Illinois and many other states for many years. Unfortunately, most of = them are probably in landfills, even though they required little maintainance. = This instrument has an independent 16' Bourdon in the pedal (14 notes, I believe), and divided stops of 16' flute TC, 8' flute, 8' dulcianna, 8' = diapason, and 4' flute. The manual has a super octave, and with the gentle 16' on the manual, it is a grand sound! Also quite a lot of literature can be played = on this wonderful instrument.   Well, when I got the letter from Virginia (Gene died several years ago), I =   thought this would be the end of that poor Hinners. Then, I thought of = the First Lutheran Church here in DeKalb. They recently dedicated a beautiful = Atrium addition to their historic building, and are due for a 150th anniversary = soon. I got the word today that the acquisition of the Hinners organ has been approved, and they plan to move it very soon. The work will done with = volunteer labor under my and organist/director Randy Stubbs's supervision.   The purchasing price is $0, and there will be costs of moving and = refinishing of casework and pipes, but how deserving for the Hinners it is that it = will reside one and one half stories up in the air, in a balcony that surrounds = the atrium (yes, they did research weight considerations). This is a church = that will appreciate this organ at last. They have wanted to have weddings in = this room, and have held some services with piano in the past, but now they = will have a pipe organ!   All stories don't turn out this great, I realize, but I thought you all = would like to be encouraged not to give up. I've seen several pipe organs disappear in spite of my begging the congregations to fix them. This is = one that worked out for the better on all counts. Keep playing, preaching about = good music in church, and don't give up!   I'll post dedication notices as soon as we get the thing back together = again. I believe it was built in 1905, which means that next year it will be 100 =   years old!!   Devon Hollingsworth, in DeKalb, Illinois      
(back) Subject: Re: Organist/choirmasters (longish) From: "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net> Date: Wed, 18 May 2005 18:01:45 -0400   Re: Organist/choirmasters (longish)Amen and Amen to Karl's comments = below about Vernon deTar, as perhaps the great examplar of the art of = playing and conducting, and also concerning his wonderful accompaniments = to major works with a second player adding a third and fourth hand at = another keyboard. I suspect Karl must have, at some time, been present = at one of Vernon's amazing annual performances of King David, with John = Upham playing on the Solo Division served by the top keyboard all kinds = of the trumpets and flourishes of this great work. I believe Vernon = presented the first New York performance of the Honegger. This was an = annual sold-out event, full of excitement. The last couple of times I = attended, people in the audience were singing the Alleluias of the final = chorus at full voice. It was simply hair-raising. The choir was = voluntary, but it was often said that they sang like a professional = choir. The old Skinner was amazing for Vernon's services and for the = concerts. I fear the Holtkamp that replaced it just could not measure = up, although the best of the big solo sounds were all kept in the = chamber on the north side of the chancel with their own keyboard. = Sometimes we students were invited to rehearse and sing with the choir, = a great experience.   Cheers,   Malcolm Wechsler www.mander-organs.com =20 ----- Original Message -----=20 From: Karl Moyer=20 To: pipechat=20 Sent: Wednesday, May 18, 2005 2:55 PM Subject: Re: Organist/choirmasters (longish)   <Major Snip>     and on occasion I have followed Vernon deTar's example and used a = second organist to add contrapuntal lines, chords, etc., that were just = not possible with one's own two hands and two feet. "The Spirit of the = Lord" is a REAL EFFORT!! I've ended up playing double-pedals at one or = two places in that piece to make more of it "happen." You are VERY = BUSY at the organ. <Big Snip>     All this being said, if there is any doubt about the ability to = do it, one should conjure up the memory of Vernon deTar doing one after = another of great sacred choral works at Ascension Church, 5th Ave & 10th = Street, NYC, during his heyday there. It was masterful and SO WELL = DONE!! Perhaps someone else did it better; my limited experience = focuses on him as the epitome of success in conduct and accompanying at = the same time. May he rest in peace. Indeed, in the columbarium = right off from the chancel at Ascension Church!   Karl E. Moyer Lancaster PA  
(back) Subject: The value of brevity From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Wed, 18 May 2005 15:50:51 -0700 (PDT)   Hello,   That's the penalty for being taught by a barrister who was the political agent for a former British Prime Minister.   It's always best to set aside a little time when talking to one's "brief" or reading my e-mails.   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK     --- "N. Russotto" <ravenrockdesigns@gmail.com> wrote: > You know, Colin, I think that's the shortest email I > have ever seen you > write! Congratulations on learning the value of > words. I figured you for a > 'barrister' ......   __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around http://mail.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Colin From: "alantaylor1" <alantaylor1@members.v21.co.uk> Date: Wed, 18 May 2005 23:52:44 +0100   Is there anyone else as bad mannered or quite as stupid as NFR on this = list? There are quite a number of members of this list,NFR, that find much of interest in Colin=92s postings. What a pity that you don=92t appear to = have just a little of interest to say. Perhaps silence might prove your best bet, until you can think of something interesting to post.=20   =20   More, much more please Colin.   =20   =20   Alan   London   =20   You know, Colin, I think that's the shortest email I have ever seen you write! Congratulations on learning the value of words. I figured you for = a 'barrister' as you use three words where one is required. :)     NFR     --=20 No virus found in this outgoing message. Checked by AVG Anti-Virus. Version: 7.0.322 / Virus Database: 266.11.12 - Release Date: 17/05/2005 =20  
(back) Subject: Editing Postings - PLEASE READ! From: "Administrator" <admin@pipechat.org> Date: Wed, 18 May 2005 18:07:25 -0500   Folks   As i have been going though today's posting I realize that it is time again to remind everyone that if you are responding to a post PLEASE edit out all the extra previous material except for maybe whatever is pertinent to your response. One post especially stood out but it was not the only one that needed some editing.   The unedited posts are especially bad for your fellow members who receive the list in Digest format since they have to scroll through all the same stuff that has been posted previously. And there is no reason for seeing the PipeChat "footer", which is put onto every post automatically by the list server, repeated over and over and over again in a response posting.   Thanks   David   -- **************************************** David Scribner Owner / Co-Administrator PipeChat   http://www.pipechat.org mailto:admin@pipechat.org