PipeChat Digest #5368 - Wednesday, May 25, 2005
 
Sydney Opera House organ
  by "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
Re: Sydney Opera House organ
  by "Hell-Concerts@t-online.de" <Hell-Concerts@t-online.de>
RE: I'm OFF TO SEE THE WIZARD .........
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: Sydney Opera House organ
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
POLAND 3 (VERY LONG)
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
RE: Sydney Opera House organ
  by "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
Genius
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: Speaking of July 3rd...
  by "Karl Moyer" <kmoyer@millersville.edu>
Re: Sydney Opera House organ
  by "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net>
 

(back) Subject: Sydney Opera House organ From: "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Wed, 25 May 2005 22:43:16 +1200   Colin ahs given us the scheme of the Riga organ. Here, by contrast, is the Sydney Opera House specification:   HAUPTWERK (man.2) 16 Prinzipal 16 Gedackt 8 Oktav 8 Gamba 8 Querflote 8 Holzflote 8 Rohrflote 5 1/3 Quint 5 1/3 Grossnasat 4 Oktav 4 Gamba 4 Spitzflote 3 1/5Grossterz 2 2/3 Quint 2 2/3 Nasat 2 Oktav 2 Hohlflote 1 3/5 Terz . Piffaro IV-VI . Terzian II . Kornett Mixture III-VI . Mixture VI . Scharff V . Zimbel IV . Kornett VI 16 Trompete 8 Trompete 4 Trompete 2 Glocken Tremulant   RUCKPOSITIV (man.1) 8 Prinzipal 8 Fiffaro 8 Gedackt 8 Quintadena 4 Oktav 4 Nachthorn 4 Rohrflote 2 2/3 Nasat 2 Oktav 2 Spitzflote 1 3/5 Terz 1 1/3 Quint 1 1/3 Sifflote 1 Oktav 2/3 Quint 1/2 Oktav 1/3 Quint 1/4 Oktav 1/6 Quint 1/8 Oktav . Sesquialtera II 16 Rankett 8 Trompete 8 Dulzian 1 Glocken Tremulant   OBERWERK (man.3) 16 Holzprinzipal 16 Quintaton 8 Prinzipal 8 Salizional 8 Schwebung 8 Spillflote 4 Oktav 4 Salizional 4 Waldflote 2 Querflote . Rauschpfeife II . Terzian II . Mixture V - VII . Scharff IV . Terz Zimbel III . Septimen Kornett C13 V 16 Kopftrompete 8 Trompete 8 Oboe 8 Vox Humana 4 Schalmei Tremulant   BRUSTWERK (man.4) 8 Gemshorn 8 Unda Maris 8 Querflote 4 Prinzipal 4 Quintadena 2 2/3 Nasat 2 Flachflote 1 3/5 Terz 1 1/3 Quint 1 1/3 Septime 1 Schwiegel 8/9 None . Glockleinton II . Schaff II . Zimbel I 16 Musette 8 Krummhorn 8 Regal 4 Trompetenregal 1/2 Glocken Tremulant   KRONWERK (man.5) . Kornett VIII-XII 16 Trompete 8 Feldtrompete 8 Vox Humana 4 Helltrompete 8 Ophecleide (sic) 2 Glocken Tremulant   PEDAL 32 Prinzipal 16 Holzprinzipal 16 Oktav 16 Violonbass 16 Subbass 10 2/3 Rohrquint 8 Oktav 8 Violon 8 Gedackt 6 2/5 Grossterz 5 1/3 Quint 4 Oktav 4 Blockflote 3 1/5 Terz 2 2/3 Quint 2 2/7 Septime 2 Nachthorn 1 Baurernflote . Rauschpfeife III . Mixture V . Scharff VII 32 Posaune 16 Posaune 16 Fagott 8 Trompete 8 Dulzian 4 Trompete 2 Singend Kornett 4 & 2 Glocken Tremulant   I was slightly wrong in saying 200 ranks of pipes. There are in fact 205 ranks.   Now, if that sounds impossible for a tracker, you'd better go and try it. The action is NOT heavy, even when coupled up. Ron Sharp, when I was with him a few years ago, said he comes into town to tune the organ once a = month. well, that morning we found just 19 pipes out of tune, and then only slightly - and they were all reeds. I asked him about the massive Mixtures and he said he hadn't touched a pipe in them for about five years. The building is kept at an exactly even temperature and humidity summer and winter, and the airpressure in the building itself is also controlled so, = as Ron says: get the organ in tune and in the Opera House that's the end of = the matter. Even in the big Mixtures, I could not find a pipe out of tune.   The interior of the instrument is very spacious, with staircases to all parts instead of ladders. The passage boards are in some places up to two feet wide, and all have lips both side of them so tool placed down cannot fall off. All pipes are within pretty easy reach of the tuner, such is the magnificent internal layout.   Ron sharp himself was an engineer by trade, and had read only two or three books on the organ (incl. Wm Sumner) and heard a few records like E.Power Bigg's stuff before he began building organs. His philosophy was not, "How do I imitate the great builders of the past and present", but "If I were = to build an organ, how would I do it?" He said this meant he could design action, chests and pipes from scratch without being bound by anyone else.   Sure, this sounds damnably arrogant. It is just that. Sharp, though, has endlessly claimed himself to be "quite simply, a genius, in = organbuilding." And so he is, but his endless self-praise and damning the work of others meant that he made many enemies and no one wants to work with him and he's had no organ, really, since the big one. He is a bitter, unhappy man with very very few friends and no one really wants to listen to him. When I = rang him, he came in from his outer suburb home especially to tune the organ = for my benefit - someone to talk to.   All this latter stuff is incredibly sad.   When the organ was being built, it wound up costing far far far more than = it was meant to, exactly like the Opera House itself, and Sharp was so slow = in doing it (everything had to be "100% perfect" to his eye, heart and ear") that in the end Beckerath of Hamburg was called in to help get the thing finished. Beckerath did not like working under Sharp, who was even by then becoming embittered and angry.   As I say, all incredibly sad, as it just has to be one of the very = greatest organs ever built.   Ross    
(back) Subject: Re: Sydney Opera House organ From: "Hell-Concerts@t-online.de" <Hell-Concerts@t-online.de> Date: Wed, 25 May 2005 13:34:45 +0200   A picture of the console can be seen in the DIAPASON, May 2005 issue, page 6. It was taken on occasion of Felix Hell's 2002-Australia-tour, performing a private recital for the staff of the Sydney Opera House. Hans-Friedrich Hell       -----Original Message----- Date: Wed, 25 May 2005 12:43:16 +0200 Subject: Sydney Opera House organ From: "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> To: "'PipeChat'" <pipechat@pipechat.org>   Colin ahs given us the scheme of the Riga organ. Here, by contrast, is the Sydney Opera House specification:   HAUPTWERK (man.2) 16 Prinzipal 16 Gedackt 8 Oktav 8 Gamba 8 Querflote 8 Holzflote 8 Rohrflote 5 1/3 Quint 5 1/3 Grossnasat 4 Oktav 4 Gamba 4 Spitzflote 3 1/5Grossterz 2 2/3 Quint 2 2/3 Nasat 2 Oktav 2 Hohlflote 1 3/5 Terz . Piffaro IV-VI . Terzian II . Kornett Mixture III-VI . Mixture VI . Scharff V . Zimbel IV . Kornett VI 16 Trompete 8 Trompete 4 Trompete 2 Glocken Tremulant   RUCKPOSITIV (man.1) 8 Prinzipal 8 Fiffaro 8 Gedackt 8 Quintadena 4 Oktav 4 Nachthorn 4 Rohrflote 2 2/3 Nasat 2 Oktav 2 Spitzflote 1 3/5 Terz 1 1/3 Quint 1 1/3 Sifflote 1 Oktav 2/3 Quint 1/2 Oktav 1/3 Quint 1/4 Oktav 1/6 Quint 1/8 Oktav . Sesquialtera II 16 Rankett 8 Trompete 8 Dulzian 1 Glocken Tremulant   OBERWERK (man.3) 16 Holzprinzipal 16 Quintaton 8 Prinzipal 8 Salizional 8 Schwebung 8 Spillflote 4 Oktav 4 Salizional 4 Waldflote 2 Querflote . Rauschpfeife II . Terzian II . Mixture V - VII . Scharff IV . Terz Zimbel III . Septimen Kornett C13 V 16 Kopftrompete 8 Trompete 8 Oboe 8 Vox Humana 4 Schalmei Tremulant   BRUSTWERK (man.4) 8 Gemshorn 8 Unda Maris 8 Querflote 4 Prinzipal 4 Quintadena 2 2/3 Nasat 2 Flachflote 1 3/5 Terz 1 1/3 Quint 1 1/3 Septime 1 Schwiegel 8/9 None . Glockleinton II . Schaff II . Zimbel I 16 Musette 8 Krummhorn 8 Regal 4 Trompetenregal 1/2 Glocken Tremulant   KRONWERK (man.5) . Kornett VIII-XII 16 Trompete 8 Feldtrompete 8 Vox Humana 4 Helltrompete 8 Ophecleide (sic) 2 Glocken Tremulant   PEDAL 32 Prinzipal 16 Holzprinzipal 16 Oktav 16 Violonbass 16 Subbass 10 2/3 Rohrquint 8 Oktav 8 Violon 8 Gedackt 6 2/5 Grossterz 5 1/3 Quint 4 Oktav 4 Blockflote 3 1/5 Terz 2 2/3 Quint 2 2/7 Septime 2 Nachthorn 1 Baurernflote . Rauschpfeife III . Mixture V . Scharff VII 32 Posaune 16 Posaune 16 Fagott 8 Trompete 8 Dulzian 4 Trompete 2 Singend Kornett 4 & 2 Glocken Tremulant   I was slightly wrong in saying 200 ranks of pipes. There are in fact 205 ranks.   Now, if that sounds impossible for a tracker, you'd better go and try it. The action is NOT heavy, even when coupled up. Ron Sharp, when I was with him a few years ago, said he comes into town to tune the organ once a month. well, that morning we found just 19 pipes out of tune, and then only slightly - and they were all reeds. I asked him about the massive Mixtures and he said he hadn't touched a pipe in them for about five years. The building is kept at an exactly even temperature and humidity summer and winter, and the airpressure in the building itself is also controlled so, as Ron says: get the organ in tune and in the Opera House that's the end of the matter. Even in the big Mixtures, I could not find a pipe out of tune.   The interior of the instrument is very spacious, with staircases to all parts instead of ladders. The passage boards are in some places up to two feet wide, and all have lips both side of them so tool placed down cannot fall off. All pipes are within pretty easy reach of the tuner, such is the magnificent internal layout.   Ron sharp himself was an engineer by trade, and had read only two or three books on the organ (incl. Wm Sumner) and heard a few records like E.Power Bigg's stuff before he began building organs. His philosophy was not, "How do I imitate the great builders of the past and present", but "If I were to build an organ, how would I do it?" He said this meant he could design action, chests and pipes from scratch without being bound by anyone else.   Sure, this sounds damnably arrogant. It is just that. Sharp, though, has endlessly claimed himself to be "quite simply, a genius, in organbuilding." And so he is, but his endless self-praise and damning the work of others meant that he made many enemies and no one wants to work with him and he's had no organ, really, since the big one. He is a bitter, unhappy man with very very few friends and no one really wants to listen to him. When I rang him, he came in from his outer suburb home especially to tune the organ for my benefit - someone to talk to.   All this latter stuff is incredibly sad.   When the organ was being built, it wound up costing far far far more than it was meant to, exactly like the Opera House itself, and Sharp was so slow in doing it (everything had to be "100% perfect" to his eye, heart and ear") that in the end Beckerath of Hamburg was called in to help get the thing finished. Beckerath did not like working under Sharp, who was even by then becoming embittered and angry.   As I say, all incredibly sad, as it just has to be one of the very greatest organs ever built.   Ross     ****************************************************************** "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" 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(back) Subject: RE: I'm OFF TO SEE THE WIZARD ......... From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Wed, 25 May 2005 04:59:00 -0700 (PDT)   Hello,   Wish I could have been there.   He's rather Goode isn't he?   Ragrds,   Colin Mitchell UK     --- Will Light <will.light@btinternet.com> wrote: > Absolutely brilliant! Best recital I've been to in a > very long while!     __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around http://mail.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Re: Sydney Opera House organ From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Wed, 25 May 2005 05:24:46 -0700 (PDT)   Hello,   Just a small correction Ross (and others). I supplied the specification for the organ of the Dreifaltigkeitskirche, Liepaja 1885 by Barnim Grueneberg, and NOT the organ by Walcker in the Riga Dom.   What a very poingnant post from Ross about Ronald Sharp.....incredibly sad.   I know that Peter Hurford rated his organs quite highly, and didn't he record Bach on the instrument of Knox Grammar School, if I recall correctly?   Of course, all that was back on the late 70's or early 80's....I forget exactly.   Genius has a habit of being socially inept, and because it just "is," it can also seem arrogant, self-obssessed and scathing. The finest exponent of the art was Prokofiev, who refused to even speak to his fellow students and felt nothing but contempt for them.   Prokofiev was, of course, on a different plane to the rest!   Henry Willis was another.....iron-willed, brilliant and utterly determined to do what he thought best. I always think of the song "I did it MY way."   People like Brunel, Cavaille-Coll and Giles Gilbert-Scott.......young, extremely gifted and unable to compromise or worry too much about what lesser mortals thought of them.   Anyway, WE like the organ at Sydney, and it's obviously wasted on those daft rugby and cricket playing Aussies.   Interesting post Sheila!   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK     --- TheShieling <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> wrote:   > Colin ahs given us the scheme of the Riga organ. > Here, by contrast, is the > Sydney Opera House specification:       __________________________________ Yahoo! Mail Mobile Take Yahoo! Mail with you! Check email on your mobile phone. http://mobile.yahoo.com/learn/mail  
(back) Subject: POLAND 3 (VERY LONG) From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Wed, 25 May 2005 08:20:06 -0700 (PDT)     POLAND 3   Hello,   Having looked at some of the wonderful historic organs and organ-cases of Poland, and the large, 18th century, 4-manual Wolff organ at Gdansk Cathedral; now re-built as a 5-manual instrument , it should be noted that two very famous organ-building dynasties worked in the area of what is now modern Poland during the 18th century. The first was that of Casparini, and the second that of Engler; the often overlooked Silesian master organ-builder of the period.   Of the former, one notable organ still exists, and now graces the University at Wroclaw (Breslau) .   The following URL will show this beautiful little instrument:-   http://www.organy.art.pl/instrumenty.php?instr_id=3D491   Tragedy was to strike in 1976, when the magnificent organ of St.Elisabeth, Wraclow (Breslau) was destroyed by fire due to an ageing and failing electric blower. Here was one of the most magnificent organ-cases in Europe, and there are just a few recordings still available from the days prior to the disaster. Built by Michael Engler, but worked upon subsequently, this was a famous organ indeed.   There remains an important organ by Michael Engler at Wniebowziecia church, Krzesz=F3w, (1732-39) which although re-built by Schlag & Soehn (1872-73), contains only two registers from the later period; the rest being by Engler. The organ-case is one of the most beautiful to be found anywhere in Poland:-   http://www.organy.art.pl/instrumenty.php?instr_id=3D491   Historic and important organs apart, the Prussian influence was to overwhelm much of Poland between the end of the 18th century and the early decades of the 20th century: so much so, that many Germans fled Poland after the war-years. On something of a cultural roll, the Prussian (German) church-authorities and organists, were ever keen to "improve" many old organs, and whilst the old organ-cases were retained, the contents within would often change dramatically.   A few organs escaped the attention of the 19th & 20th century "improvers" such as the following:-   http://www.organy.art.pl/instrumenty.php?instr_id=3D11   Two organ builders stand out as the most active in the area we now call Poland during the 19th and early 20th centuries. First of these was the mighty Sauer firm, who built the enormous instrument of the Jahrhundrethalle Breslau.....as monumental as the building in which it was installed, and typical of the German cultural and technological dynamic of the day. (Made of concrete, this building had the largest dome in the world when it was built). The huge 5-manual Sauer instrument eventually formed the basis of the present instrument in Wroclaw (Breslau) Cathedral.   http://www.organy.art.pl/instrumenty.php?instr_id=3D12   Sauer re-built a large number of organs in Poland; usually converting them into romantic style instruments with complex pneumatic actions. Some, like the huge Breslau instrument, used the patented electro-pneumatic action designed by Paul Walcker, who had fallen out with the members of his family associated with the Walcker company in Germany. Paul Walcker eventually took over the running of the Sauer concern.   Another firm, who built many fine romantic instruments, was that of Schlag & Soehn.   The organ-consoles of Sauer and those of Schlag & Soehn were very similar, and almost always utilised complex registrational devices and rollschwellers, first introduced by Walcker in Germany.   A late Schlag & Soehn organ console which more resembles an old telephone exchange than an organ, can be found at the following URL.....visually "interesting," to say the least:-   http://www.organy.art.pl/instrumenty.php?instr_id=3D104     For sheer in-elegance, the following organ must have the ugliest organ-console ever made!   http://www.organy.art.pl/instrumenty.php?instr_id=3D422   If organ-building took on a distinctly Prussian quality in the partitioned area of Poland under their rule during the 19th century and the early decades of the 20th century, things were much less agreeable in the Russian owned partition, where there was an aggressive attempt to eradicate all traces of Polish culture; even the language being officially replaced by Russian. Only in the Austrian sector of partitioned Poland, was some degree of Polish national autonomy retained.   Nevertheless, by the 1890's, the former Polish region was in a terrible state, and almost a fifth of the entire population fled to the US before the outbreak of the First World War; such was the scale of the poverty. When war broke out in 1914, it was the former Poland on which the battles were fought between Russia, Austria and Germany. Sadly, many of the people who regarded themselves as "Poles", were forced to fight against their fellow "Poles" as a result of partitioning and wartime conscription.   After peace was declared, Poland once more had autonomy, but the "new" country was totally devastated by war and the economy was in tatters. As a consequence of this poverty, organ-building more or less ground to a halt; leaving many instruments damaged, destroyed or vandalised. Nevertheless, worse was yet to come.   http://www.organy.art.pl/instrumenty.php?instr_id=3D635   With the invasion of Poland by Adolf Hitler on 17th September, 1939, the 2nd World War effectively began when the British Prime Minister declared, "I have to tell you that no such undertaking has been received, and consequently this country is now at war with Germany."   During the war years, the intelligentsia were executed or sent to labour-camps, 3,000,000 Jews were killed in the Nazi death-camps and they were joined by "political prisoners of war" from other countries; notably Russia.   At the end of the war, a staggering 6,000,000 Poles were dead....about 20% of her pre-war population.   Between 1944 - 1945, the victorious Russians set up a communist regime in Poland, with the approval of the US and Britain after the Yalta Conference. Thus started a oppressive era, in which all aspects of art and music were controlled by the state. The brilliance of former Polish composers such as Chopin and the work of contemporary composers was disregarded by the Soviet masters, and the requirement was now that of "folk based music"......to the glory of the "common people" and the noble communist experiment.   Although it has been thus far impossible to find evidence, there seems every likelihood that the Polish-communist authorities would control organ-building in exactly the same way that other communist regimes did in neighbouring countries such as East Germany, where "official" instrument makers were permitted to work for state-controlled industry. There is certainly evidence of the Sauer company being decimated, and the workshops ransacked by the communists when Breslau was absorbed by the Soviet controlled government of Poland.   Nevertheless, organ-building DID continue; albeit from the workshops of Eastern Germany, Hungary and Czechoslovakia as much as from indigenous Polish organ-builders. During the communist years, not only were church organs built and repaired, there were a number of substantial concert hall organs built.   It must also be said that music flourished in Poland during the communist regime, but of course, the music had to be essentially romantic and based upon the music of the people....ie: folk music. Certainly, music education not only survived, but actually went from strength to strength.   If one thing stands out in post-war organ building in Poland, it is the sheer ugliness of much of the work. Crude rows of pipes seem to be quite common as organ facades: a far cry from the exquisite beauty of the old organ-cases. The organ consoles also appear to be crudely made, with what look like modern laminate materials of dubious quality. But why should we be surprised?   The isolation of Poland (and much of the former Eastern Bloc) was such, that anything obtained from western countries would have been extremely expensive, and in any event, with the totalitarian state control of the communist government, there would almost certainly have been restrictions imposed on almost all things; including the availability and choice of materials.   In the next (and last) review of Poland, we'll take a look at present-day organ-building in Poland, even though the lines of communication are fraught with difficulty and the translations especially difficult.   In the meantime, perhaps we should consider Polish music a little, and for those who think that the young Bach had a unique style of writing Toccatas for the organ, they might like to think again!!   Listen to the following, by the Polish composer Podbielski:-   http://www.bernardyni.ofm.pl/klasztor/lezajsk/PODBIEL.MP3     Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK         __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? 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(back) Subject: RE: Sydney Opera House organ From: "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Thu, 26 May 2005 04:16:12 +1200   >Just a small correction Ross (and others). I supplied the specification for the organ of the Dreifaltigkeitskirche, Liepaja 1885 by Barnim Grueneberg, and NOT the organ by Walcker in the Riga Dom.   Yes, I was aware of that.   >I know that Peter Hurford rated his organs quite highly, and didn't he record Bach on the instrument of Knox Grammar School, if I recall correctly?   Yes. And he made at least one lp at the Opera House. ARGO: ZRDL 1016. My copy is dated 1983. It was a "Digital Recording" and pressed in Holland though the sleeve was printed in England, actually recorded in August = 1982.   >Genius has a habit of being socially inept, and because it just "is," it can also seem arrogant, self-obssessed and scathing.   And yet Haydn, grossly underrated as a composer, was known as Papa as he = was such a friendly and loving man to everyone. How do we describe you, Colin? Would you be flattered if we said you're socially inept (therefore a genius), or if we said you're a wonderful fellow to spend time with (and therefore possibly hopeless in other ways)??? (Das ist ein joke, Haw haw = haw haw).   >Anyway, WE like the organ at Sydney, and it's obviously wasted on those daft rugby and cricket playing Aussies.   Oh I dunno: maybe Abp Jensen's lot will hold rain shelter meetings there......... :-)   Ross    
(back) Subject: Genius From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Wed, 25 May 2005 09:30:58 -0700 (PDT)   Hello,   I don't know whether I ever met a genius or not, because I wouldn't know how to recognise one!   Nevertheless, I think we can safely assume that certain people were or are.....Bach, Beethoven, Brahms, Mozart....maybe Reger also.   I always think that certain organs are works of genius, but I wouldn't place (for example) William Hill in that category, whereas I certainly would the names of Schnitger, Silbermann and Muller, to name but three.   I knew a now deceased genius...Prof.Sir Fred Hoyle...the man who coined the phrase "the big bang."   Unless you knew his reputation or understood maths and astronomy, his genius was not terribly apparent.   One of the brightest people I know is a pioneeering spirit in the world of digital organs and music reproduction. He can stop mid-sentence and mid-meal to ponder a question, and as the egg dribbles down his tie, his wife will draw attention to it. Without further thought, he usually just grinds the egg into the material with his hand and then answers the question!!   I've often wondered if a genius is someone who can do lots of things well, or someone who does only one thing perfectly.....food for thought.   Anyway, the only REAL genius was my mother, who gave birth to me and taught me all she knew!   ;-)     Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK (definitely not a genius!)                     __________________________________ Discover Yahoo! Find restaurants, movies, travel and more fun for the weekend. Check it = out! http://discover.yahoo.com/weekend.html    
(back) Subject: Re: Speaking of July 3rd... From: "Karl Moyer" <kmoyer@millersville.edu> Date: Wed, 25 May 2005 13:02:36 -0400   > I have long felt that the North American continent and its riches are > enormously generous gifts of God. The conquest of this territory and its > acquisition represents a turning point in the history of our sphere. The > founding of the USA represents that point in history where people ceased = being > subjugated and began determining their own destiny.   Two points:   1. The writer speaks of =B3the conquest of this territory...=B2 Yes. That means that native Americans were somehow defeated, killed, removed, whatever. Was this action a generous gift of God?   2. The writer speaks of =B3where people ceased being subjugated and began determining their own destiny.=B2 What about the American Indians? What about the Mormons? Racist policies and practices for YEARS against American black citizens? What about American incarceration of oriental people in W. W. II?   We need to practice a greater level of humility about our tendency toward national error.    
(back) Subject: Re: Sydney Opera House organ From: "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net> Date: Wed, 25 May 2005 13:37:56 -0400   Dear Colin,   Peter actually made a full cassette recording of the Opera House Organ, shortly after it was built. I can't recall now just what was on it, but it =   was a good program for showing the Organ off, and it was sold widely. If = you are keen to know, I know just where to start digging to find the original.   Cheers,   Malcolm Wechsler www.mander-organs.com     ----- Original Message ----- From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Wednesday, May 25, 2005 8:24 AM Subject: Re: Sydney Opera House organ     > Hello, > > > What a very poingnant post from Ross about Ronald > Sharp.....incredibly sad. > > I know that Peter Hurford rated his organs quite > highly, and didn't he record Bach on the instrument of > Knox Grammar School, if I recall correctly? > > > Interesting post Sheila! > > Regards, > > Colin Mitchell UK > > > --- TheShieling <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> wrote: >