PipeChat Digest #5376 - Sunday, May 29, 2005
 
Re: Bi-Vocational Organists (for Glenda and those who are)
  by "Karl Moyer" <kmoyer@millersville.edu>
Re: blown rectifier fuse
  by "Paul Smith" <kipsmith@getgoin.net>
Slush
  by <RMB10@aol.com>
Re: Tempo and the Bach B Minor P/F(8' Flute!)
  by <sowerby@comcast.net>
Practicing organ works at the piano
  by "Desiree'" <nicemusica@yahoo.com>
Re: blown rectifier fuse
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net>
Re: Practicing organ works at the piano
  by "Alicia Zeilenga" <azeilenga@theatreorgans.com>
Re: Tempo and the Bach B Minor P/F(8' Flute!)
  by "Alicia Zeilenga" <azeilenga@theatreorgans.com>
RE: Slush
  by "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
RE: Slush
  by "Randy Terry" <randy_terry@hotmail.com>
Re: Tempo and the music of Bach
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
Re: Slush
  by "Andy Lawrence" <lawrenceandy@gmail.com>
Re: Unenclosed celestes (was 5th manuals-Keates-Geissler)
  by "Andy Lawrence" <lawrenceandy@gmail.com>
Organs and Organists online on May 29th
  by "John Foss" <harkat@kat.forthnet.gr>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Bi-Vocational Organists (for Glenda and those who are) From: "Karl Moyer" <kmoyer@millersville.edu> Date: Sat, 28 May 2005 22:22:08 -0400   Interesting to read of Glenda as an attorney serving as an organist. I know a number of persons who combine those two. One is one of the committe= e folks for OHS convention in Indianapolis IN in a few years. Such bi-vocational lives let the music =B3spice=B2 the =B3other=B2 life the person leads= .. I=B9ve known quite a few bankers who are also wonderful Church musicians.   There is another combination which has less spice and sometimes more =B3drag=B2 to it: the music teacher who is also a Church musician. This was m= y life, going from teaching music in a university situation by day to playing and teaching =8Bchoir rehearsal is teaching! -- more of the same by night and on week-ends. For such persons having a church position makes your life almost a seven-day-a-week music life with relatively little break from it all. It was a little more convenient for me, since I taught in higher education and could control my daily schedule at least a LITTLE, usually at least enough to leave a two-hour block of time somewhere most days to go fo= r a long run. But at points it becomes a real drag, in part because time away from teaching is not the same sort of relief that one might have if he were a farmer or a house painter or a bus driver or the like.   Yet, more than not, I enjoyed my professional life and would do it all over again. Teaching is special, given that the disciplines=B9 address =B3Rabbi=B2 to Jesus meant =B3teacher=B2 and therefore that I shared my professiona= l calling with the Lord himself. Not even my pastor could claim that. :-) Thus, the teaching function at church was equally meaningful, though not more than teaching in a state university system where our function was to deal with =B3the populace=B2 who came to college. That was the great American dream getting worked out right in the very lives of so many students I had who were first-generation college students in their respective families.   But at times it does become a real drag, and the older you get, the les= s energy to have to put up to it.   Cordially,   Karl E. Moyer Lancaster PA  
(back) Subject: Re: blown rectifier fuse From: "Paul Smith" <kipsmith@getgoin.net> Date: Sat, 28 May 2005 21:30:34 -0500   I had our almost-new Astron quit completely while still under warranty. I sent it back for repair, and in the meantime an engineer showed me how we could run the organ (the 14 volt "electro-" part of electro-pneumatic) = using jumper cables from the battery borrowed from the church's tractor, hooked = up with an auto-type battery charger. It worked great for several weeks until =   the repaired Astron was returned and reinstalled. I'm sure several city types will hollar and quote codes, but there are good points to living in = a small town! And the story of running the organ off the tractor battery = made a good article in the monthly newsletter. = Kip in Missouri      
(back) Subject: Slush From: <RMB10@aol.com> Date: Sat, 28 May 2005 22:33:28 EDT   Devon wrote: When we added the Italian "Principalino" in the Choir (digital), we also added its celeste, so this set is under expression. 16 ranks of celestes = is a heavenly sound, and I use many different varieties every service, = sometimes altogether (also 3 Voxes!). You can never have too much slush! As Dr. William Barnes used to tell me, "It makes them sit back in the pew and purr!".   Amen! I think it is Fred Swann who has said "celestes and voxes have = saved more souls than all the mixtures in creation". (or something to that = effect) I love a sold principal chorus as much as the next person, but give me some slush and I'm a happy camper! They are especially useful in evangelical = type services where music is played underneath prayers, underneath Scripture = readings, while latecomers are seated, while the children march out to Sunday = School, while people come forward at the Altar Call, etc. If one really knows how = to work them right, you can increase the weekly offering by using them, too! = LOL (just kidding)   Monty Bennett  
(back) Subject: Re: Tempo and the Bach B Minor P/F(8' Flute!) From: <sowerby@comcast.net> Date: Sun, 29 May 2005 02:35:58 +0000   Desiree':   Instead of the Flute 8, try practicing on a 4' flute on each manual and = pedal. You will find the clarity and control amazingly satisfying. Much = wear and tear on the ears can be saved with such practice saving the = "registrations" for when you get more familiarity with the music.   Leo-by-the-Lake   -------------- Original message --------------   Thank you all for your comments. All are very good.   The reason I asked about tempo and the B Minor was to see simply: How fast = (or slow) do you like to hear the work? I do not expect to have the tempo = mastered in a weeks time. I like hearing this pieces at about the same = tempi that Karl Moyer mentioned.   Of course, In learning the piece, I'm going to sit down at an 8' flute = using slow practice,drilling over the spots that are difficult, and even = going to the most dificult section of the work first. When it comes = tolearning pieces, I learned from a masterclass once that one does not = always have to start at the begining. That was one of the most helpful = comments ever. I do like Tim Grenz's idea of a page at a time. I get more = covered learning one page at a time. __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around http://mail.yahoo.com
(back) Subject: Practicing organ works at the piano From: "Desiree'" <nicemusica@yahoo.com> Date: Sat, 28 May 2005 19:40:09 -0700 (PDT)   Anyone else like to learn organ pieces at the piano?     __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around http://mail.yahoo.com
(back) Subject: Re: blown rectifier fuse From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net> Date: Sat, 28 May 2005 21:47:21 -0500   This works every time. If your rectifier quits and you have an important service or recital, just go out to your car and get the battery. If the organ has any solid state be very careful to get the + and - the right way around.   John Speller   ----- Original Message ----- From: "Paul Smith" <kipsmith@getgoin.net> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Saturday, May 28, 2005 9:30 PM Subject: Re: blown rectifier fuse     > I had our almost-new Astron quit completely while still under warranty. = I > sent it back for repair, and in the meantime an engineer showed me how = we > could run the organ (the 14 volt "electro-" part of electro-pneumatic) using > jumper cables from the battery borrowed from the church's tractor, = hooked up > with an auto-type battery charger. It worked great for several weeks = until > the repaired Astron was returned and reinstalled. I'm sure several city > types will hollar and quote codes, but there are good points to living = in a > small town! And the story of running the organ off the tractor battery made > a good article in the monthly newsletter.      
(back) Subject: Re: Practicing organ works at the piano From: "Alicia Zeilenga" <azeilenga@theatreorgans.com> Date: Sat, 28 May 2005 22:37:07 -0500   Depends. If the piece was written by someone who had a good piano background, such as Franck or Dupre, yes. Usually trying Bach on the piano just makes for messy articulation later on.   Alicia Zeilenga "Santa Caecilia, ora pro nobis"     -----Original Message----- From: Desiree'   > Anyone else like to learn organ pieces at the piano? >      
(back) Subject: Re: Tempo and the Bach B Minor P/F(8' Flute!) From: "Alicia Zeilenga" <azeilenga@theatreorgans.com> Date: Sat, 28 May 2005 22:34:21 -0500   Depending on your organ, another good practice registration is an 8' flute and a 4' principal. This is the way that my professor taught me and it works really well for me.   Alicia Zeilenga "Santa Caecilia, ora pro nobis"       > Desiree': > > Instead of the Flute 8, try practicing on a 4' flute on each manual > and pedal. You will find the clarity and control amazingly satisfying. > Much wear and tear on the ears can be saved with such practice saving > the "registrations" for when you get more familiarity with the music. > > Leo-by-the-Lake      
(back) Subject: RE: Slush From: "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Sun, 29 May 2005 15:58:04 +1200     >16 ranks of celestes is a heavenly sound, and I use many different varieties every service, sometimes altogether (also 3 Voxes!). You can never have too much slush! As Dr. William Barnes used to tell me, "It makes them sit back in the pew and purr!". I think it is Fred Swann who has said "celestes and voxes have saved more souls than all the mixtures in creation". [big snip]   That would depend entirely on what you're used to. Quite honestly, that = kind of sound would make we want to vomit and I'd run screaming from the = church, wondering why anyone would waste such an appalling amount of money on something unlistenable.   As I said, likes and dislikes depend on what you're used to be.   I never, ever, play over anyone else's speaking, and there'd be trouble if = I even tried anyway. In our traditional Anglican services I play for here, there's absolutely no kind of situation in which use a heap of Celestes anyway, or even any kind of slush.   Not being critical of you, but do be aware that traditions differ = enormously on what is even acceptable, let alone what is desirable.   Ross    
(back) Subject: RE: Slush From: "Randy Terry" <randy_terry@hotmail.com> Date: Sat, 28 May 2005 21:38:26 -0700   In the US, celestes greatly enhance the warmth of organs, especially in acoustically challenged rooms. In dead rooms, several celestes are imperitive when getting nice accompanimental sounds and effects for soft atmospheric music.   One of the most thrilling Anglican hymn accompaniments I've ever heard was =   at the Advent Cathedral in Birmingham, AL, where the 16-8-4 celeste pairs = in the solo were coupled to the 5 other pairs of celestes with the 32' = Bourdon underneath at an AGO convocation for the opening hymn, number 35 in the Episcopal Hymnal (can't remember the specifics.)   I think one automatically gets the sounds of evangelical organists in = their minds on this subject, but many ranks of celestes can indeed be tasteful = and beautiful and totally in keeping with a ritualistic setting.   Randy Terry   _________________________________________________________________ Express yourself instantly with MSN Messenger! Download today - it's FREE! =   http://messenger.msn.click-url.com/go/onm00200471ave/direct/01/    
(back) Subject: Re: Tempo and the music of Bach From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Sun, 29 May 2005 02:17:18 EDT   Above all, Bach should flow.....or is that "Streaming Bach?"   Regards,   Colin MItchell UK   Colin, no truer words were ever spoken. Bach's music should soar and with great power. I don't mean over all loudness, but the power of bringing out the individual parts creating great beauty and a singing quality. Over articulation can destroy the music, while under = articulation can have an equally devastating effect. Your ear and the room should be the over riding consideration.   Good advice.   Ron Severin    
(back) Subject: Re: Slush From: "Andy Lawrence" <lawrenceandy@gmail.com> Date: Sun, 29 May 2005 00:00:48 -0700   I must admit to being philosophically uncomfortable with the idea of liking only what you're used to. If its true, the demise of the organ is certain, as few young people are "used to" it.   I hope... sincerely hope, that most people can appreciate something good, even if its new to them. It is the only hope the organ has.=20 Not that I have my hope set in the organ, not even close. But I like it, and would like to see it continue.   Maybe the slush isn't good,that's ok. Or maybe its good, but you just don't like it. That's cool. But in general, please, be open to good new things that you're not used to. Its what makes life life.   Andy     >That would depend entirely on what you're used to. Quite honestly, that > > kind of sound would make we want to vomit and I'd run screaming from the >church, > wondering why anyone would waste such an appalling amount of money on > something unlistenable. >=20 > As I said, likes and dislikes depend on what you're used to be. >=20 > I never, ever, play over anyone else's speaking, and there'd be trouble i= f I > even tried anyway. In our traditional Anglican services I play for here, > there's absolutely no kind of situation in which use a heap of Celestes > anyway, or even any kind of slush. >=20 > Not being critical of you, but do be aware that traditions differ enormou= sly > on what is even acceptable, let alone what is desirable. >=20 > Ross  
(back) Subject: Re: Unenclosed celestes (was 5th manuals-Keates-Geissler) From: "Andy Lawrence" <lawrenceandy@gmail.com> Date: Sun, 29 May 2005 00:15:47 -0700   Ok, I see. I'm all for that. The implication seemed to be (and often is) "if the literature doesn't specifically call for it, it doesn't belong". Guess that's not what you meant. I would have been more comfortable with "In what creative ways could the unenclosed celeste be utilized" or something like that. One way I often use such a sound is as an echo for the repeat in a choral prelude, since its often very soft. Or I'd use it anywhere where one would traditionally use an undulant, as long as it was a situation where I could live without swell expression, which frankly is almost always. (Dont' get me wrong... I am ALL for having expression available... in my perfect world, all divisions of all organs would be under separate expression) Andy     > Well I'd like to hear what others would do with it. Most likely I'll lea= rn > someother way of doing it instead of just my way all of the time. > Travis   =20 > Why must we always ask "what would necessitate?" Are we so uncreative > as to not be able to imagine a way to use this? I'm not a very good > organist and I'm pretty sure I could make use of it. > Andy   =20 > > Ok, now we've established they do exist elsewhere. What would necessit= ate > an unenclosed celeste? > > Travis  
(back) Subject: Organs and Organists online on May 29th From: "John Foss" <harkat@kat.forthnet.gr> Date: Sun, 29 May 2005 10:48:56 +0300   Today we welcome Belgium organist Johan Hermans to organs and organists online for the first time. http://www.organsandorganistsonline.com/ He = is to be heard playing two renowned organs which have been topics for discussion on the list. Firstly the IV/81 1923 Adema Organ in St. Bavo Cathedral, Haarlem, The Netherlands, on which he plays, appropriately, the =   "Cantabile" by Nicolas Jacques Lemmens - Mr. Hermans holds a Masters = Degree from the Lemmens Institute in Louvain, Belgium. The second organ he plays = is the III/81 Eule Organ in Warsaw Cathedral in Poland, where he has chosen = the Capriccio by Jozef Surzynski. Surzynski was a dynamic character: as well = as being a priest he combined editing with publishing and musicology, and led =   the reform of Catholic church music in Poland during the late 19th = century. Thank you, Johan, for this enjoyable offering.   David Lines is to be heard playing a lively Voluntary in D major by = William Boyce. Born in 1711, his appointments included those of composer to the Chapel Royal and organist at St Michael', Cornhill in the City of London, = a post later held by Dr Harold Darke and currently by Jonathan Rennert. = There is an interesting biography to be found at http://www.rslade.btinternet.co.uk/boyce/ We have also added David's performance of Mendelssohn's Sonata in B flat, Op. 65, No. 4. Both these recordings were made on the III/26 Kilgen Organ in the Holy Rosary = Catholic Church, Edmonds, WA.   Finally we go over to the IV/132 Steinmeyer organ in Nidaros Cathedral (Trondheim) Norway to hear Jon Kristian Fjellestad in two of his improvisations. ".Brilliant indeed! And the organ sounds like it's never been through the not very successful rebuild in the 60's." (Jarle = Fagerheim writing in ooo-members@smartgroups.com ).   The site re-design is still in progress - Tim Grenz is working on the members area and file storage at present - with around 140 recordings this =   takes time! However most of the files are up and running and we have successfully managed the "bandwidth" problem with the introduction of the members area. Don't forget the files can be both downloaded and listened = to in "streaming audio". Right click on the mp3 icon and choose "open link", for streaming, "save target as" for downloads.       John Foss   http://www.organsandorganistsonline.com/ http://launch.groups.yahoo.com/group/orgofftop/   "Oui ou Non" to the European Constitution